ASIC shifts strategy from financial literacy to capability

The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) is proposing updates to its National Financial Literacy Strategy, including shifting the focus to financial capability and outcomes rather than financial literacy alone.

ASIC’s National Financial Literacy Strategy, described as “a framework to guide policies, programs and activities that aim to strengthen Australians’ financial literacy and capability” was initially introduced in 2011, and last updated in 2014.

While previous versions of the strategies have had 3-year timeframes, the proposed 2018 strategy could have a 10 year timeline, to better guide and support sustained action over time.

One significant update proposed for 2018 is one of language; going from referring to ‘financial literacy’ to referring to ‘financial capability’. This proposed change is in recognition of a renewed focus on supporting behavioural change in Australians to actively achieve financial outcomes.

According to the consultation document:

  • 42% of Australians say they don’t feel confident managing their money day-to-day
  • 36% find dealing with money stressful and overwhelming
  • 21% have difficulty understanding financial matters

These figures, combined with the high degree of mortgage stress and household debt recorded around the nation, make it clear that Australians require “a combination of financial knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours necessary to make sound financial decisions, based on personal circumstances, to improve financial wellbeing” – the current ASIC definition of Financial Literacy.  

The push for greater financial capability, and not just literacy, draws inspiration from similar strategies in the United Kingdom and New Zealand:

“The United Kingdom identifies ‘financially capable behaviours’ such as: keeping track of finances, saving regularly, managing credit use, and working towards longer-term goals.”

“New Zealand’s approach is to frame financial capability activity around five streams of work: talk, learn, plan, debt-smart, save/invest.”

Core behaviours to be encouraged by the proposed strategy include:  

  • Managing money day-to-day: Keeping track of money in and out; controlling spending; effectively managing debt and credit; protecting assets with insurance; and building a savings buffer to weather financial shocks.
  • Planning for the future: Setting and working towards savings goals; understanding and engaging with superannuation; planning and investing for retirement and lifestyle choices.
  • Making informed decisions: Having confidence to make money decisions and interact with financial products and services; knowing how to access impartial information and financial education, and get guidance or help when necessary; being comfortable talking about money with family and friends.

Priority audiences for the current strategy include Indigenous Australians, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, pre-retirees and seniors, and women. The 2018 update is set to expand this audience to include:

  • People with disabilities (and their families or carers) who are navigating choices and options under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)
  • People in newly-arrived communities who are attempting to understand and access financial services
  • Sole parents who may be experiencing long periods of financial hardship or difficulty 

ASIC deputy chair, Peter Kell, said:

“Building financial capabilities requires a long-term commitment to lay the foundations for behavioural change over time.  We all confront significant financial decisions at key points in our lives, such as leaving school, having children, or reaching retirement.  To help people develop healthy financial habits and make better decisions about money we’re seeking feedback on the National Strategy.”

Feedback on the consultation paper is due by Friday 17 November 2017.

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Learn more about bank accounts

Do I need to open a business bank account?

Just because you’re in business doesn’t necessarily mean you need a business bank account. You could be a sole trader not registered for GST, and use your personal bank account for business.

If you do want a business account, there are plenty of benefits attached to business transaction and savings accounts, as well as business term deposits.

There are business bank accounts designed for businesses with a high volume of transactions, and those for start-ups with a small amount of trade. You could also include an EFTPOS service with your account.

Some business bank accounts charge for the number of transactions per month, while others offer a pay-as-you-go fee structure, where you only pay fees for transactions you make.

It’s up to you whether your priority is mainly transactions, or earning the maximum amount of interest on your principal. There’s a business banking solution for you if you need one.

Can a debt collector garnish my bank account?

A debt collector can garnish your bank account, but only with a court order. This drastic action is usually taken only if you’ve ignored several notices asking you to pay the debt.

If this happens, there is nothing you can do to stop it other than immediately pay back your what you owe in full or make arrangements to pay it off in installments.

Once a garnishee order is issued, your bank will put a freeze on your account as it processes the order. This usually takes two to three days and you won’t be able to access any of your money during this time.

If you have Centrelink payments, they may be protected, depending on what the court order says.

Are bank accounts frozen when someone dies?

Yes, Australian bank accounts are frozen when someone dies. If you want to close the account of somebody who has died, you might have to provide proof of death and a copy of the will. You might also have to prove your relationship to the deceased person.

If you have a joint bank account with somebody who has died, you will generally be entitled to all the money in the account. Again, you might have to provide proof of death if you want to change the bank account from a joint account to a one-person account.

Can I start a bank account online?

Yes, most lenders that operate in Australia will let you set up a bank account online. The process is usually simple and takes five to 10 minutes. You will probably need to provide a passport or birth certificate, as well as a driver’s licence, Medicare card or another form of secondary identification. Requirements differ from lender to lender, so some institutions might ask for more or different forms of ID.

Can you deposit money into somebody else's bank account?

One of the easiest banking tasks in the world is depositing money. You can even deposit money into someone else’s bank account if you wish.

The basic information you need to deposit money into a third-party bank account is:

  • Payee’s name
  • Bank, building society or credit union (though this isn’t necessary)
  • BSB (or bank code, which is the branch identifier)
  • Account number

Including the name of the financial institution isn’t necessary – particularly with online banking – because the BSB will identify this for you.

A handy tip is to record yourself (or add a personal message) in the transaction description or reference. This will show up on the recipients account, letting them know who’s paid them the money.

How do I close my bank account online?

You can usually easily open a bank account online, but you often can’t close it online.

Many banks and credit unions will only let you close an account if you go into a branch or call them on the phone.

However, some banks will let you request to close the account via your internet banking. Check your financial provider’s website for details.

Just remember: If you still have funds in the bank account, transfer them to another account, or withdraw the cash. Also, if you have any payments like direct debits going in or out of the bank account, these will also stop when you close your account.

What do I need to open bank accounts online?

Opening a bank account online is a simple process and only takes between five to 10 minutes to complete. To get started you will need a computer or smartphone with internet access.

Information to have available when you’re ready to apply is:

  • Identification (such as driver’s licence, birth certificate, passport, proof-of-age card)
  • Tax file number
  • Residential address, email and a contact number

In some cases, you might be asked to provide employment details. If you’re not able to verify your identity online, most financial institutions let you provide this in the branch at a later date.

There are some types of bank account that you can apply for only in a branch. However, most bank accounts can be applied for conveniently online.

How do I overdraw my Commonwealth Bank account?

Overdrawing a bank account can happen by accident. It’s often hard to know what your balance is, particularly with direct debits, scheduled repayments and pending transactions competing for cash.

To avoid being stuck with a bank fee every time your account is overdrawn, you can apply for a personal overdraft. This will enable you to overdraw your account up to an approved amount.

A personal overdraft is connected to your CommBank Everyday Account, so you can enjoy easy access to extra funds once approved – anywhere from $100 up to $20,000.

Your overdraft funds can be accessed via your CommBank keycard or Debit MasterCard, or online through NetBank and the CommBank app.

To apply you can either call the Commonwealth Bank directly or visit your local branch.

How do you deposit change into your bank account?

One way to deposit change into your bank account is to visit a branch. Many lenders will also allow you to deposit your change through one of their ATMs.

Can you open a bank account at 16?

Yes, you can open a bank account at 16, or even younger. If you’re 13 or under, you will probably need a parent to accompany you to a branch.

How do you find a bank account number by name?

For privacy reasons, Australian banks won’t hand out account numbers or other details about their customers. However, if you provide a bank with a BSB and account number, they should be able to confirm if those numbers belong to one of their customers.

How do you change your account name on NAB banking?

Changing the name on your NAB bank account is straightforward, as long as you have the right documents.

If you’ve just got married, divorced or legally changed your name, here’s what you need:

  • Married – a marriage certificate
  • Divorced –your ‘decree nisi’
  • Legal name change –your legal name change certificate

You can take either the original document, or a certified copy, into a NAB branch, where it needs to be sighted by a bank employee and a copy taken.

Your NAB bank account name will be updated immediately. New debit, ATM and credit cards with your updated name will also need to be issued. These usually take between five to 10 working days to be posted out to you. Your existing cards will keep working until you activate your new ones.

If you haven’t legally changed your name, but just want to change your account nicknames, you can log onto NAB and do it through the Settings/Mailbox menu.

Can I close a bank account with pending transactions?

You can close a bank account with pending transactions. But after the account is closed, any incoming transactions will be declined by your (old) bank.

The best way to ensure this doesn’t occur is to either wait to close your account until all pending transactions are complete, or contact the creditor and supply them with alternate bank details.

If you’re unsure whether you have any scheduled transactions, you can speak to a banking representative over the phone or via online support.

In most cases, your bank withholds the amount owing for pending transactions (such as online purchases).

Because the pending amount is deducted from your bank balance, you can close your bank account and the purchase will be honoured.

Which bank is best for business accounts?

Unfortunately, there’s no definitive answer to the question of which bank is best for business accounts. That’s because ‘best’ will differ from customer to customer, depending on their unique circumstances. These include not only your company’s financial position, but also its size, its age and the sector in which it operates. Another factor to consider is what features you want in a bank account. Your business may require different features than another business; and your business may require different features tomorrow than it does today.

The best thing to do is to thoroughly research the market before opening a business account. And when you do open an account, you should reassess your options every year or two, because the market moves quickly. A particular bank might offer the best account today, but be surpassed by one or several rivals tomorrow.