Mortgage House

New Car Loan (Packaged with Advantage Home Loan Special) PAYG

Advertised Rate

4.99

% p.a

Variable

Comparison Rate*

6.28

% p.a

Upfront Fee

$199

Loan amount

$5k to $50k

Real Time Rating™

3.39

/ 5
Repayment

based on $30,000 loan amount for 5 years at 4.99%

Advertised Rate

4.99

% p.a

Variable

Comparison Rate*

6.28

% p.a

Upfront Fee

$199

Loan amount

$5k to $50k

Real Time Rating™

3.39

/ 5
Repayment

based on $30,000 loan amount for 5 years at 4.99%

Calculate your repayments for this loan

I'd like to borrow

$

Loan term

years

Your estimated repayment

$566

based on $30,000 loan amount for 5 years at 4.99%

Quick car loan review

For New Car Loan (Packaged with Advantage Home Loan Special) PAYG

These are the benefts of this car loan.

  • Interest rates ranked in the best 20%
  • No early exit penalty
  • Unlimited extra repayments
  • Flexible repayment options
  • Can apply in branch

These are the drawbacks of this car loan.

  • Service fee charged
  • Higher than average application fee
  • Limited to new cars
  • Cannot apply online

Car loan overview

For New Car Loan (Packaged with Advantage Home Loan Special) PAYG

Details

Total repayments

Interest rate type

Variable

Borrowing range

$5k - $50k

Security type

Secured

Loan term

0 year to 7 years

Secured by

Vehicle

Loan type

Is Fully Drawn Advance

Repayment frequency

Weekly, Fortnightly, Monthly

Age of car

Features

Extra repayments

Yes

Redraw facility

redraw activation fee of $0

Instant approval

Time to funding

N/A

Fees

Upfront Fee

$199

Ongoing Fee

$10 Monthly

Missed Payment Penalty

$0

Early Exit Penalty Fee

$0

Permitted Loan Purposes

New Car

Used Car

Motorcycle

Boat

Application method

Online

Phone

Broker

In branch

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FAQs

Can you get a chattel mortgage with bad credit?

Getting approval for a chattel mortgage with bad credit may be possible, given ‘chattel’ (usually a piece of equipment or car) is put up as security for the loan. That means if you fail to repay the loan, the creditor can recover the loaned amount by repossessing and selling the car or piece of equipment. This differs from unsecured car loans, where the asset is not tied to the loan and cannot be taken if you don’t meet the repayments. 

What is a chattel mortgage?

A chattel mortgage is a mortgage on a movable item. In the case of a car loan, the chattel is the vehicle. The lender maintains a mortgage over the chattel/vehicle until the loan is fully repaid.

What is a chattel mortgage fee?

A chattel mortgage fee is an amount you’ll pay the lender to procure the funds for a chattel mortgage.

You can use a chattel mortgage to finance vehicles used for your business at least 50 per cent of the time. It’s similar to a secured vehicle loan. The lender will give you the funds required to purchase the vehicle whilst you retain the ownership. The finance company then holds a mortgage on the vehicle, using the car as the security, until you repay the loan amount. At the end of the loan term or once you’ve paid it off, the lender will release the mortgage. Alternatively, you can opt to trade-in or refinance the residual value.

What is a chattel mortgage used for?

A chattel mortgage is usually used to buy an asset - such as a car - for your company for business use. Relatively similar to regular mortgages, a chattel mortgage structure is based on a lender providing you with funds to purchase an asset while registering their security interest on the Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR) for the life of the loan. In this case, the asset is known as the chattel. After the loan has been repaid, you will have full ownership of the asset. 

A popular finance option, a chattel mortgage is usually preferred by self-employed or small business owners, due to flexible options available for repayment. In some cases, you may get 100 per cent of the cost of the asset, which means that no upfront deposit needs to be put down.

However, it’s important to note that a chattel mortgage is not regulated under the National Consumer Credit Protection Act. It’s therefore important to seek advice about the product and fully understand the agreement terms before signing.

What do I need to apply for a chattel mortgage?

Chattel mortgages are a form of secured car loan for businesses. The lender will set up a mortgage, while you take the car’s ownership. When the mortgage is paid off, you own the car. The borrowed amount is repaid through regular installments over a fixed period of time.

To qualify, you’ll have to meet the following chattel mortgage requirements:

  • The car should be used for business purposes at least 51 per cent of the time.
  • You must hold a valid Australian Business Number (ABN).
  • You must show you can service the loan on time
  • Identity proof
  • Financial records, such as profit and loss account and balance sheet
  • Details of the vehicle you want to buy
  • Bank statement for your business

Can you terminate your chattel mortgage early?

Some lenders might provide you with an option to terminate your chattel mortgage early by repaying the full amount before the term is over. This way, your overall loan term decreases, therefore reducing the interest you need to pay.

It’s important to note that some lenders might charge a fee for you to pay off your chattel mortgage early. So, if you’re planning to terminate your chattel mortgage early, make sure you check if your lender allows you to do this. You should also determine if there are any additional fees or charges that you would need to pay to do this.

Does my insurance cover other cars I drive?

If you’re driving someone else’s car, say your friend’s, and you’re involved in an accident, whose insurance is responsible, yours or your friend’s? Does car insurance cover driving other people’s cars?

The short answer is yes. A few car insurance providers offer insurance cover for people to drive someone else’s car. It’s always better to double-check this before you get behind the wheel.

If you’re not covered, you can opt for non-owner car insurance which lets you drive someone else’s car and be protected against liability. However, you will not benefit from other coverage such as damage to the vehicle, replacement rental or medical expenses.

Getting comprehensive insurance driving other cars can be done with temporary insurance. It’s recommended that you do this if you plan to drive someone else’s car, even for a short duration. You can choose between policies that cover you for a fortnight, a month or even a pay-as-you-drive option with temporary insurance.

Alternatively, you can ask the car’s owner to check with their insurer if you can be added to the policy. This will ensure that you are covered fully with comprehensive car insurance driving other cars. Do note that adding you could increase the annual premium for the owner.

What is a balloon payment?

Some lenders will offer borrowers reduced monthly repayments in return for a one-off lump sum – or balloon payment – that the borrower has to pay at the end of the loan. Generally, the total repayments on a loan with a balloon structure will be higher than a loan without.

What is trade-in value?

The trade-in value is the price you could realistically charge if you were to sell your car to a dealer while buying a replacement vehicle. Generally, a car’s trade-in value is less than its market value. That’s because the dealer has no interest in buying your car unless it can make a profit – which can only be done if the dealer has room to increase the price.

What is an establishment fee?

Some lenders will charge you an establishment fee, or one-off upfront fee, to cover the cost of setting up your car loan.

What is residual value?

The residual value of a car is how much it will be worth at the end of a lease period. Finance companies need to calculate a car’s residual value before they can know how much to charge during the lease period. For example, if a financier calculates that a $30,000 car will have a residual value of $16,000 at the end of a five-year lease, the financier will know that it must charge $14,000 to break even on the lease – and more to make a profit.

What is a loan-to-value ratio?

The loan-to-value ratio, or LVR, is a percentage that expresses the amount of money owed on the car compared to the value of the car. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have a loan-to-value ratio of 75 per cent. Loan-to-value ratios change over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, although there would still be a $5,000 difference between the size of the outstanding loan and the value of the car, the loan-to-value ratio would now be 67 per cent.

What is a pre-approval?

A pre-approval is a formal document that indicates how much a lender is willing to lend to a consumer – once that person has found the car they want to buy. A lender will assess a borrower’s credit history and financial circumstances before issuing a pre-approval. However, lenders are under no obligation to follow through on pre-approvals, so pre-approvals should be seen as statements of intent rather than rock-solid guarantees.

What is a green slip?

A green slip, also known as compulsory third-party insurance or CTP insurance, is compulsory if you want to register a vehicle in Australia. If you’re responsible for a car accident, your green slip will be used to pay any compensation due to anyone who might be injured or killed. However, a green slip doesn’t cover you for vehicle damage or theft.

What is a car loan?

A car loan, also known as vehicle finance, is money that a consumer borrows with the express purpose of buying a vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, van, truck or campervan. Car loans can be used for both new and used vehicles.

What is a novated lease?

A novated lease is a car lease that is ‘novated’, or transferred from one party to another. Novated leases are often used when companies provide a car as part of a salary package. The employer signs for the lease and makes the lease payments, but the employee assumes the responsibility of looking after the car. While most car leases involve two parties, novated leases involve three – employer, employee and financier.

What is an unsecured car loan?

An unsecured car loan is a loan that is not connected to a form of security, or collateral. Not all lenders provide unsecured car loans – and if they do, they generally charge higher interest rates for their unsecured car loans than their secured car loans.

What is borrowing capacity?

Borrowing capacity is the amount of money that a consumer is able to borrow from a lender. Each consumer’s circumstances are unique, so different people will have different borrowing capacities. Lenders use their own in-house formulas to calculate borrowing capacity, so the same consumer might have different borrowing capacities at different lenders.

What is comprehensive insurance?

Comprehensive insurance protects you in the event you’re responsible for a car accident. Policies vary from provider to provider, but comprehensive insurance generally covers you for damage to your car and property, as well as the other parties’ cars and property. A comprehensive insurance policy may also protect you from theft, vandalism and natural disasters.

What is vehicle finance?

Vehicle finance, also known as a car loan, is money that a consumer borrows with the express purpose of buying a vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, van, truck or campervan. Vehicle finance can be used for both new and used vehicles.