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New vehicle sales for April reach historic level

New vehicle sales for April reach historic level

It would appear that demand for new vehicles is continuing to grow, with last month’s new vehicle sales figures reaching the highest level on record for the month of April.

Data released by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) revealed that the total sales for the month of April 2021 were 92,347, while just 38,926 sales were recorded in the corresponding month in 2020.

These results also make April 2021 the sixth consecutive month of growth, following 31 months of declining figures.

FCAI’s chief executive, Tony Weber, said that confidence in the new vehicle market was high, and could be expected to continue to grow through the remainder of the year.

“New vehicles sales are a direct reflection of the performance of the broader economy in terms of consumer and business confidence,” Mr Weber said.

“This time last year, we were seeing significant impacts from COVID-19, with less customer activity and enquiries to dealerships.

“Historically, the April result is between 70,000 and 80,000 vehicles, so the 2021 result is very significant.”

According to Mr Weber, supply chain constraints – such as a shortage of semiconductors and shipping issues related to delays through the Suez Canal – were impacting the delivery of new vehicles to Australian customers.

“Every vehicle company is focused on solving the issues caused by these impacts, and they are working with customers to keep them fully informed regarding supply issues and delivery dates,” he said.

“It is possible there is pent up market demand which may be reflected in sales figures in the second half of 2021 as solutions are found to these issues.”

Meanwhile, the used car market has also seen a significant increase in demand, with wholesale used-vehicle prices 37 per cent higher in March than a pre-pandemic high set in February 2020.

Constrained new vehicle supply is seen as one of a range of factors influencing this increase.

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This article was reviewed by Head of Content Leigh Stark before it was published as part of RateCity's Fact Check process.

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Learn more about car loans

What is vehicle finance?

Vehicle finance, also known as a car loan, is money that a consumer borrows with the express purpose of buying a vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, van, truck or campervan. Vehicle finance can be used for both new and used vehicles.

What is a car loan?

A car loan, also known as vehicle finance, is money that a consumer borrows with the express purpose of buying a vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, van, truck or campervan. Car loans can be used for both new and used vehicles.

Should I service my own car?

There are also costs associated with vehicle ownership, such as paying for petrol and the obligatory ongoing maintenance. But should you cut down on costs by servicing your own vehicle?

If you’re considering getting out the tool box, spanner, and grease-laden towel, you need to carefully weigh up the risks and benefits. A trained mechanic will need to complete certain tasks, while you may be perfectly capable to handle other aspects yourself.

If you’re short on time, it may be worth paying for the convenience of a full vehicle service. However if you’re trying to slash your expenses, there are some basic maintenance tasks that you can complete yourself.

You should call a mechanic if you’re unsure about a vehicle maintenance task you’re about to take on. However there are a number of maintenance tasks that you may be able to complete with your own two hands including:

  • Replacing your car battery
  • Changing the oil
  • Replacing worn windscreen wipers
  • Replacing blown fuses

Remember to keep your car’s body in good condition, by washing and applying a protective wax on a regular basis, too.

Always check your car warranty agreement as some new car purchases come with an extended car warranty provided your services are conducted at the vehicle service centre where you purchased the car. In these circumstances, you may find the service fee is capped, alleviating some of the maintenance woes.

What is a dealership?

A dealership is a car yard or a place where cars are sold.

How do you get a car loan?

There are four different ways you can get a car loan. You can go straight to a lender. You can get a finance broker to organise a car loan for you. You can get ‘dealer finance’ – which is when the car dealer organises a car loan for you. Or you can organise your own car loan through a comparison website, like RateCity.

Whichever method you choose, you will need to provide proof of identification, proof of income and proof of savings. So you may be asked for any combination of passport, driver’s licence, bank statements, payslips, tax returns and utility bills. You might also be asked to provide proof of insurance.

What is dealer finance?

Dealer finance is a car loan organised through a car dealer – as opposed to car loans organised by a finance broker or directly by the lender.

What is a loan-to-value ratio?

The loan-to-value ratio, or LVR, is a percentage that expresses the amount of money owed on the car compared to the value of the car. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have a loan-to-value ratio of 75 per cent. Loan-to-value ratios change over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, although there would still be a $5,000 difference between the size of the outstanding loan and the value of the car, the loan-to-value ratio would now be 67 per cent.

What is a loan term?

The loan term is the amount of time the lender gives you to repay the car loan. For example, if you take out a $20,000 car loan with a five-year loan term, you would be expected to pay off the entire $20,000 (plus interest) within five years.

Can you refinance a car loan with the same lender?

You may be looking to refinance your car loan to get lower interest rates or reduce the total monthly amount you have to pay. Often, this leads to the question ‘can I refinance a car loan with the same bank?’

While it’s always worth shopping around for a better deal or at least to compare offers from other lenders, you can sometimes refinance to a different loan with the same lender. It may be simpler,  as the lender already has your details and knows your repayment history. 

Having said that, knowing the terms offered by other lenders may help you negotiate a better deal with your current lender.

How to get a chattel mortgage?

Both businesses and individuals may use a chattel mortgage, provided that the car is being used predominantly for business purposes. 

To apply for a chattel mortgage, you need to first consider your options and choose a suitable lender that meets your requirements. Once you have selected a lender, you can apply for the loan online by filling out a form. If the lender doesn’t offer an online application process, you can either call them or visit their nearest branch. 

After you’ve applied, the lender will ask you to supply documents that confirm your identification, income, job profile, etc. If everything is in order, most lenders will arrange the loan’s settlement, so all you need to do is pick up your car!

Can you get a chattel mortgage with bad credit?

Getting approval for a chattel mortgage with bad credit may be possible, given ‘chattel’ (usually a piece of equipment or car) is put up as security for the loan. That means if you fail to repay the loan, the creditor can recover the loaned amount by repossessing and selling the car or piece of equipment. This differs from unsecured car loans, where the asset is not tied to the loan and cannot be taken if you don’t meet the repayments. 

Can an individual apply for a chattel mortgage?

Lenders offer chattel mortgages as a way to finance vehicles used for business purposes. Companies, as well as individuals, are eligible to apply for and receive chattel mortgages. The essential eligibility requirement is that the vehicle is used for business at least 51 per cent of the time. If you’re a tradesman and require a new utility vehicle to move equipment, you can apply for a chattel mortgage to finance the purchase.

A chattel mortgage for individuals is an option if you’re self-employed and have an Australian Business Number (ABN). You’ll also need to be registered for the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and have a clear credit history. Like all other loan types, you’ll have to prove your capability to service the loan to qualify for a chattel mortgage.

You’ll retain the ownership while the lender holds the vehicle as security for the loan in a similar way as they would a property with a home loan. You repay the borrowed amount in predetermined monthly instalments. Once you repay the entire loan amount, the lender will remove the mortgage.

What is equity?

The equity is the share of the car that you own. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have $5,000 of equity in the vehicle, or 25 per cent. (The lender has the other 75 per cent.) Equity changes over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, you would still have $5,000 of equity in the vehicle, but your share would be 33 per cent.

What is stamp duty?

Stamp duty, or motor vehicle duty, is a tax you pay when you transfer a car into your name. Stamp duty applies to both new and used cars. Stamp duty is a state tax, so rates and conditions vary from state to state: New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania, ACT and Northern Territory.