Compare Visa credit cards

Find a credit card that best suits your needs. Compare interest rates, balance transfer rates, annual fees and more from Australia's leading lenders, big and small. - Data last updated on 24 Oct 2018

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Compare Visa credit cards

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Popular credit cards products

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Visa’s catch cry is “everywhere you want to be” and when it comes to credit cards, it certainly delivers. As well as offering all the traditional features, Visa has embraced new technology to help you make purchases quickly and easily, whether in person or online.

Visa is one of three main credit cards issuers in the world, and in Australia they’ve partnered up with a large number of banks and credit unions.

What type of Visa credit card would suit me best?

There are three key things you need to look at when deciding on a credit card:

  • Fees
  • Interest rates
  • Rewards

These key points vary significantly between the different types of Visa credit cards currently available. It’s important to note that banks and credit unions actually issue the cards, not Visa, and so the features and fees depend heavily on the financial institution.

There are ‘standard’ Visa credit cards, which offer zero or low fees, as well as a few perks. Then there are ‘gold’ Visa credit cards, which suit moderate to high spenders as they offer good dollar-for-dollar rewards and features. Then there are ‘platinum’ Visa credit cards, which are popular with big spenders as they offer premium perks and rewards but often require a significant minimum spend.

RateCity has a handy comparison tool to help you see the key differences between credit cards currently on offer.

What perks and services do Visa credit card holders have access to?

Just like Mastercard and American Express, there is an enormous list of rewards and perks including free travel, frequent flyer points, cashback and shopping. However, Visa does offer some exclusive services.

One special feature of Visa credit cards is users can pre-purchase tickets to concerts and gigs before they go on sale to the public.

Visa has also come up some clever new technology that’s made using your credit card even easier.

These include:

  • Visa payWave – This allows you to pay for purchases by tapping your credit card or smartphone or Visa-branded wearable, including newly designed Visa-branded sunglasses
  • Visa Checkout – Visa offers an in-app payment service that reduces the number of steps it takes to make a payment online when you’re using your smartphone or tablet
  • Visa Direct This is a platform that lets you simply transfer funds from your bank account or payment card to another personal or business account using a smartphone, tablet or the internet

How can I apply for a Visa credit card?

Like any credit card, you’ll need to be at least 18 years old, and prove you have employment or a reliable income.

Banks and credit unions usually require the following documents;

  • A copy of your driver’s licence
  • A copy of your passport or Medicare card
  • Proof of income in the form of recent payslips, or an ATO tax statement or a letter of employment
  • Employer or accountant contact details

Wait times vary between providers, but usually if your application is successful, your Visa credit card would arrive within five to 10 days.

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FAQs

The numbers on your credit card actually follow a universal standard which is used to identify specific functions. Each credit card has a different amount of numbers: Visa and Mastercard have 16, American Express has 15 and Diner’s Club has 14. The first number on a credit card always identifies what type of credit card it is. Visa cards start with a 4, whereas Mastercard starts with a 5 and American Express with a 3. The remainder of the digits represent the account number, including the last number which is used to verify that your credit card is actually valid. Credit cards also have additional verification numbers, which are mainly used when the card isn’t present for phone and online purchases. These are the three-digit numbers on the back of Visa and MasterCard or the four-digit numbers on the front of an American Express card.

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^Words such as "top", "best", "cheapest" or "lowest" are not a recommendation or rating of products. This page compares a range of products from selected providers and not all products or providers are included in the comparison. There is no such thing as a 'one- size-fits-all' financial product. The best loan, credit card, superannuation account or bank account for you might not be the best choice for someone else. Before selecting any financial product you should read the fine print carefully, including the product disclosure statement, fact sheet or terms and conditions document and obtain professional financial advice on whether a product is right for you and your finances.

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