About low doc home loans

About low doc home loans

A low doc loan or low-documentation loan is for someone, generally the self-employed, who has difficulty coming up with the necessary documentation required to apply for a traditional home loan. This may include those with a poor credit history or who don’t work full time.

Low doc loans traditionally have higher rates of interest than traditional loans, as they represent greater risk to the lender. As a result borrowers applying for a low doc loan may be required to secure the loan with assets such as vehicles, homes you own or other investments.

These types of loans generally require a larger deposit than most traditional loans do, with loan to value ratios (LVR) typically ranging from 60 to 80 percent. By comparison, at the time of writing most traditional home loans had an LVR of around 95 percent, meaning just 5 percent deposit is required.

How to apply for a low doc loan

If you think a low doc loan would be suitable for you, check out our low doc loans options and start comparing now.

Using the site you can compare low doc loan options, by rate, fees and repayments. Or click on a specific product you may be interested in and you’ll be able to find out even more about the details and features of the product.

Tips to help you compare home loans

  • Do your homework – use a comparison site to make the job simpler
  • Compare at least three products when looking for a home loan
  • Crunch the numbers: compare more than simply the rate – fees and features shouldn’t be overlooked
  • Consider using the “comparison rate” rather than “advertised rate” for a better indication of the real costs of taking out the loan – the comparison rate factors in costs such as some fees
  • Keep an eye on the market and compare again down the track to make sure it is still the best option for you.
  • Use a home loan repayment calculator to estimate your monthly repayments and total interest payable for each home loan you are considering.

Did you find this helpful? Why not share this article?

Advertisement

RateCity

Money Health Newsletter

Subscribe for news, tips and expert opinions to help you make smarter financial decisions

By signing up, you agree to the ratecity.com.au Privacy & Cookies Policy and Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy

Advertisement

Learn more about home loans

How is the flexibility score calculated?

Points are awarded for different features. More important features get more points. The points are then added up and indexed into a score from 0 to 5.

Does Real Time Ratings' work for people who already have a home loan?

Yes. If you already have a mortgage you can use Real Time RatingsTM to compare your loan against the rest of the market. And if your rate changes, you can come back and check whether your loan is still competitive. If it isn’t, you’ll get the ammunition you need to negotiate a rate cut with your lender, or the resources to help you switch to a better lender.

What is appreciation or depreciation of property?

The increase or decrease in the value of a property due to factors including inflation, demand and political stability.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Results

These are the loans that may be suitable, based on your pre-selected criteria. 

What is breach of contract?

A failure to follow all or part of a contract or breaking the conditions of a contract without any legal excuse. A breach of contract can be material, minor, actual or anticipatory, depending on the severity of the breaches and their material impact.

What is a valuation and valuation fee?

A valuation is an assessment of what your home is worth, calculated by a professional valuer. A valuation report is typically required whenever a property is bought, sold or refinanced. The valuation fee is paid to cover the cost of preparing a valuation report.

How much are repayments on a $250K mortgage?

The exact repayment amount for a $250,000 mortgage will be determined by several factors including your deposit size, interest rate and the type of loan. It is best to use a mortgage calculator to determine your actual repayment size.

For example, the monthly repayments on a $250,000 loan with a 5 per cent interest rate over 30 years will be $1342. For a loan of $300,000 on the same rate and loan term, the monthly repayments will be $1610 and for a $500,000 loan, the monthly repayments will be $2684.

What factors does Real Time Ratings consider?

Real Time RatingsTM uses a range of information to provide personalised results:

  • Your loan amount
  • Your borrowing status (whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor)
  • Your loan-to-value ratio (LVR)
  • Your personal preferences (such as whether you want an offset account or to be able to make extra repayments)
  • Product information (such as a loan’s interest rate, fees and LVR requirements)
  • Market changes (such as when new loans come on to the market)

Mortgage Calculator, Interest Rate

The percentage of the loan amount you will be charged by your lender to borrow. 

Mortgage Calculator, Property Value

An estimate of how much your desired property is worth. 

What is a specialist lender?

Specialist lenders, also known as non-conforming lenders, are lenders that offer mortgages to ‘non-vanilla’ borrowers who struggle to get finance at mainstream banks.

That includes people with bad credit, as well as borrowers who are self-employed, in casual employment or are new to Australia.

Specialist lenders take a much more flexible approach to assessing mortgage applications than mainstream banks.

What is the average annual percentage rate?

Also known as the comparison rate, or sometimes the ‘true rate’ of a loan, the average annual percentage rate (AAPR) is used to indicate the overall cost of a loan after considering all the fees, charges and other factors, such as introductory offers and honeymoon rates.

The AAPR is calculated based on a standardised loan amount and loan term, and doesn’t include any extra non-standard charges.

Mortgage Balance

The amount you currently owe your mortgage lender. If you are not sure, enter your best estimate.

What is a redraw fee?

Redraw fees are charged by your lender when you want to take money you have already paid into your mortgage back out. Typically, banks will only allow you to take money out of your loan if you have a redraw facility attached to your loan, and the money you are taking out is part of any additional repayments you’ve made. The average redraw fee is around $19 however there are plenty of lenders who include a number of fee-free redraws a year. Tip: Negative-gearers beware – any money redrawn is often treated as new borrowing for tax purposes, so there may be limits on how you can use it if you want to maximise your tax deduction.