What you should know about hobby farm home loans

What you should know about hobby farm home loans

As a country, Australia is about the outdoors, and many Aussies would prefer to live somewhere quieter and greener. Purchasing a hobby farm is one way of achieving this dream, and allows you to enjoy the peace of the countryside and even raise a crop or a few cattle. Getting a hobby farm home loan can be a difficult task, though, as you’ll need to convince the lender you’re not planning on farming commercially in addition to negotiating for the preferred loan terms. Your best bet may be finding a lender specialising in loans for rural properties.

What are hobby farm home loans?

If you’d like to try the rural life without actually becoming a farmer, a hobby farm may suit you just right. Depending on your budget, you can buy a few hectares of land, build a residence and take up some farming or animal husbandry as a recreation. While all this may sound easy and restful, trying to find hobby farm loans can be quite tricky. For instance, the size of your rural property is critical to the amount of money you can borrow without being considered a commercial borrower.

Most lenders do not consider property exceeding a 100 hectares in size as hobby farms, and will ask you to apply for a commercial farm loan. Even for farms of size less than 100 hectares, the deposit you have to put down increases with the land area. Note that lenders use the term loan-to-value ratio (LVR), meaning the ratio of the home loan amount to the value of your farm, to indicate how much you can borrow. Your may be able to borrow a certain LVR based on the size of your hobby farm.

Some lenders may offer you a 100 per cent LVR hobby farm home loan if you can find someone to guarantee the loan. You may, however, need to check several boxes before any such loan is approved. Remember that if you are planning to buy a large hobby farm, you need to save up a greater percentage of the farm’s value to pay the deposit on the hobby farm home loan.

Things to remember when applying for hobby farm home loans

You probably won’t qualify for a hobby farm home loan if you’re planning to farm for profit or use money earned from the farm to pay back the loan. Again, the loan will only cover the value of the rural land and any fixed structures previously constructed on it. A hobby farm home loan will not cover farm equipment, livestock, or agricultural implements and products.

Also, lenders offering hobby farm home loans may only approve loans for rural properties that meet certain criteria, including:

  • Location and zoning criteria: Many lenders may offer loans only for hobby farms located in some postcodes and zones. Zoning can vary from state to state but, in general, the land must be classified as either rural, residential, rural residential, or flexible. As the terms suggest, the use of the land matters as much as its size.
  • Accessibility: You may be thinking of your rural home as a retreat, mostly cut off from the rest of the world. But lenders will require some basic access infrastructure such as a dirt road, and utility connections for power, water, and sewage.  

Also, you may need to check with lenders about the kind of improvements you can make on the farm. Any development that’s considered commercial, or violating zoning regulations, can be considered a breach of the loan agreement.

How do I apply for a hobby farm home loan?

Before you start meeting lenders or putting together a home loan application, you may want to confirm the zoning, land use, and proposed developments in the area you’re planning to buy a hobby farm. You may be able to get this information from the local council office, along with suggestions on the lenders you can approach. Having this information may help you confirm your choice of rural property and also ease your conversation with lenders. You should also know fairly certainly your plans for the land - are you planning to raise animals, or grow a crop or two?

You’ll then need to find a lender offering a suitable home loan based on the size of your hobby farm and the planned use. You can reach out to a mortgage broker in case your research doesn’t help you find the right lender. A broker’s experience can save you time and effort and even speed up the application process. You should remember that some lenders may insist on assessing your hobby farm, in addition to verifying your income and credit score, before finalising the terms of your home loan. You may need to negotiate on the deposit or find a guarantor if you aren’t able to put down the necessary deposit. 

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Can I take a personal loan after a home loan?

Are you struggling to pay the deposit for your dream home? A personal loan can help you pay the deposit. The question that may arise in your mind is can I take a home loan after a personal loan, or can you take a personal loan at the same time as a home loan, as it is. The answer is that, yes, provided you can meet the general eligibility criteria for both a personal loan and a home loan, your application should be approved. Those eligibility criteria may include:

  • Higher-income to show repayment capability for both the loans
  • Clear credit history with no delays in bill payments or defaults on debts
  • Zero or minimal current outstanding debt
  • Some amount of savings
  • Proven rent history will be positively perceived by the lenders

A personal loan after or during a home loan may impact serviceability, however, as the numbers can seriously add up. Every loan you avail of increases your monthly installments and the amount you use to repay the personal loan will be considered to lower the money available for the repayment of your home loan.

As to whether you can get a personal loan after your home loan, the answer is a very likely "yes", though it does come with a caveat: as long as you can show sufficient income to repay both the loans on time, you should be able to get that personal loan approved. A personal loan can also help to improve your credit score showing financial discipline and responsibility, which may benefit you with more favorable terms for your home loan.

How much deposit do I need for a home loan from ANZ?

Like other mortgage lenders, ANZ often prefers a home loan deposit of 20 per cent or more of the property value when you’re applying for a home loan. It may be possible to get a home loan with a smaller deposit of 10 per cent or even 5 per cent, but there are a few reasons to consider saving a larger deposit if possible:

  • A larger deposit tells a lender that you’re a great saver, which could help increase the chances of your home loan application getting approved.
  • The more money you pay as a deposit, the less you’ll have to borrow in your home loan. This could mean paying off your loan sooner, and being charged less total interest.
  • If your deposit is less than 20 per cent of the property value, you might incur additional costs, such as Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI).

How to apply for ANZ home loan during maternity leave?

Qualifying for an ANZ home loan while you’re on maternity leave may require some research.

Much like other home loan applications, you'll need to be able to show the lenders that you’ll be able to pay the mortgage instalments on time, even during maternity leave, which can improve  chances of your home loan being approved. Your chances improve if you have savings, home equity, or if you receive any government-related benefits.

You’ll likely need  to provide no less than three payslips you received before the start of your maternity leave and a letter from your employer, with the letter stating the maternity leave terms such as the date on which you’ll return to work and the kind of employment (full-time, part-time, or casual) when you resume.

Your lender will likely consider the tenure of your maternity leave while assessing your loan application. Lenders also prefer if you are paid while on maternity leave; however, you may receive only half your salary, so the lender may not consider your regular income to determine the loan amount.

How to apply for a pre-approval home loan from Bendigo Bank?

Applying for pre-approval on your home loan gives you confidence in your ability to secure finance while looking at potential new homes. You can get a free and personalised pre-approval home loan from Bendigo Bank in just a few minutes, without any credit checks or paperwork. 

Bendigo Bank offers pre-approval for home loans that allow you to understand the home loan size you may be able to get before looking for a new home. 

With the pre-approval, Bendigo Bank provides an estimate of your borrowing power. This figure incorporates stamp duty, lenders mortgage insurance (LMI) and any first home buyer incentives you may be eligible for. You may also qualify for the First Home Loan Deposit Scheme initiative, depending on your circumstances. 

To apply for a pre-approval on your home loan from Bendigo Bank, all you need to do is fill in a smart form. You could also contact the bank directly on 1300 236 344.

How to apply for a home loan pre-approval from St. George?

By applying for a home loan pre-approval, you can establish how much you can afford to borrow and look for houses within that pre-approved budget. Getting home loan pre-approval from St. George is a fairly simple process that can be completed within 15 minutes. 

The first step in this process is completing a home loan application. Once that application is submitted, a home loan expert from St. George will contact you to understand your requirements and your current financial position. You could also directly contact a home loan expert at the bank by calling 13 33 30 or by visiting your nearest branch. 

Once the application has been processed, the home loan expert will ask for some basic documentation to confirm your borrowing capacity. After this, you should be issued a home loan pre-approval, subject to certain conditions. 

Based on your home loan pre-approval from St. George, you can then find a property and make an offer. Your home loan expert will arrange to have the property valued and may request for more documentation, taking your home loan application to the next step. 

 

 

How much deposit do I need for a home loan from NAB?

The right deposit size to get a home loan with an Australian lender will depend on the lender’s eligibility criteria and the value of your property.

Generally, lenders look favourably on applicants who save up a 20 per cent deposit for their property This also means applicants do not have to pay Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI). However, you may still be able to obtain a mortgage with a 10 - 15 per cent deposit.  

Keep in mind that NAB is one of the participating lenders for the First Home Loan Deposit Scheme, which allows eligible borrowers to buy a property with as low as a 5 per cent deposit without paying the LMI. The Federal Government guarantees up to 15 per cent of the deposit to help first-timers to become homeowners.

Can I change jobs while I am applying for a home loan?

Whether you’re a new borrower or you’re refinancing your home loan, many lenders require you to be in a permanent job with the same employer for at least 6 months before applying for a home loan. Different lenders have different requirements. 

If your work situation changes for any reason while you’re applying for a mortgage, this could reduce your chances of successfully completing the process. Contacting the lender as soon as you know your employment situation is changing may allow you to work something out. 

Is a home equity loan secured or unsecured?

Home equity is the difference between its current market price and the outstanding balance on the mortgage loan. The amount you can borrow against the equity in your property is known as a home equity loan.

A home equity loan is secured against your property. It means the lender can recoup your property if you default on the repayments. A secured home equity loan is available at a competitive rate of interest and may be repaid over the long-term. Although a home equity loan is secured, lenders will assess your income, expenses, and other liabilities before approving your application. You’ll also want  a good credit score to qualify for a home equity loan. 

Can I apply for an ANZ non-resident home loan? 

You may be eligible to apply for an ANZ non-resident home loan only if you meet the following two conditions:

  1. You hold a Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa or its predecessor, the Temporary Skilled Work (subclass 457) visa.
  2. Your job is included in the Australian government’s Medium and Long Term Strategic Skills List. 

However, non-resident home loan applications may need Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB) approval in addition to meeting ANZ’s Mortgage Credit Requirements. Also, they may not be eligible for loans that require paying for Lender’s Mortgage Insurance (LMI). As a result, you may not be able to borrow more than 80 per cent of your home’s value. However, you can apply as a co-borrower with your spouse if they are a citizen of either Australia or New Zealand, or are a permanent resident.

Can I refinance if I have other products bundled with my home loan?

If your home loan was part of a package deal that included access to credit cards, transaction accounts or term deposits from the same lender, switching all of these over to a new lender can seem daunting. However, some lenders offer to manage part of this process for you as an incentive to refinance with them – contact your lender to learn more about what they offer.

Can I salary sacrifice my home loan?

You can pay for your home loan straight from your pre-tax salary by salary sacrificing. Of course, this will depend on your employer’s policy. 

Salary sacrifice for home loans is offered exclusively for owner-occupied properties, so it cannot be used for investments.

Your employer may need to pay Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT), but non-profit organisations are exempt from this tax up to a certain limit. Some organisations may charge you an administrative fee to set this up. 

Keep in mind not all lenders accept salary sacrifice payments on your mortgage. Some lenders, like NAB, accept salary sacrificing for home loans.

Salary sacrificing won’t work for everyone, but in certain circumstances there are benefits to paying your home loan from your pre-tax income. These include reduced tax liability and potentially paying off your home loan quicker.

What happens when you default on your mortgage?

A mortgage default occurs when you are 90 days or more behind on your mortgage repayments. Late repayments will often incur a late fee on top of the amount owed which will continue to gather interest along with the remaining principal amount.

If you do default on a mortgage repayment you should try and catch up in next month’s payment. If this isn’t possible, and missing payments is going to become a regular issue, you need to contact your lender as soon as possible to organise an alternative payment schedule and discuss further options.

You may also want to talk to a financial counsellor. 

What happens to your mortgage when you die?

There is no hard and fast answer to what will happen to your mortgage when you die as it is largely dependent on what you have set out in your mortgage agreement, your will (if you have one), other assets you may have and if you have insurance. If you have co-signed the mortgage with another person that person will become responsible for the remaining debt when you die.

If the mortgage is in your name only the house will be sold by the bank to cover the remaining debt and your nominated air will receive the remaining sum if there is a difference. If there is a turn in the market and the sale of your house won’t cover the remaining debt the case may go to court and the difference may have to be covered by the sale of other assets.  

If you have a life insurance policy your family may be able to use some of the lump sum payment from this to pay down the remaining mortgage debt. Alternatively, your lender may provide some form of mortgage protection that could assist your family in making repayments following your passing.

Who offers 40 year mortgages?

Home loans spanning 40 years are offered by select lenders, though the loan period is much longer than a standard 30-year home loan. You're more likely to find a maximum of 35 years, such as is the case with Teacher’s Mutual Bank

Currently, 40 year home loan lenders in Australia include AlphaBeta Money, BCU, G&C Mutual Bank, Pepper, and Sydney Mutual Bank.

Even though these lengthier loans 35 to 40 year loans do exist on the market, they are not overwhelmingly popular, as the extra interest you pay compared to a 30-year loan can be over $100,000 or more.