Beyond Bank Australia

Total Home Loan Package Variable Home Loan (First Home Buyers) (New Customer)

Real Time Rating™

1.99

/ 5
Advertised Rate

3.24%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

3.65%

Maximum LVR
95%
Real Time Rating™

1.99

/ 5
Monthly Repayment

$1,704

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years

Highlighted

2.49%

Variable

2.49%

UBank

$1,184

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.47

/ 5
View Now

RateCity Says: With a discounted variable interest rate and no upfront or ongoing fees, you may be able to minimise the cost of your owner-occupied home loan.

Calculate repayment for Beyond Bank product

Advertised Rate

3.24%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

3.65%

Maximum LVR
95%
Real Time Rating™

1.99

/ 5

I'd like to borrow

$

Loan term

years

Your estimated repayment

$1,704

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years

Pros and Cons

Pros and Cons

  • No upfront fees
  • 100% full offset account
  • Suitable for low deposits
  • Extra repayments and redraw facility
  • Ongoing fee
  • Discharge fee at end of loan
  • No repayment holidays

Beyond Bank Features and Fees

Beyond Bank Features and Fees

Details

Maximum LVR
95%
Total Repayments
Next LVR
Interest rate type
Variable
Borrowing range
Suitable for
Owner Occupiers
Loan term range
5 - 30 years
Principal & interest
Interest only
Applicable states
ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC, WA
Make repayments
Fortnightly, Monthly, Weekly

Features

Extra repayments
Yes - unlimited extra repayments
Redraw facility

Redraw fee: $0

Split interest facility
Loan portable

Repayment holiday available

Allow guarantors

Available for first home buyers

Fees

Total estimated upfront fees
$0
Application fee
$0
Valuation fee
At Cost
Settlement fee
$0
Other upfront fee
$0
Ongoing fee
$395 annually
Discharge fee
$295

Application method

Online
Phone

In branch

Pros and Cons

  • No upfront fees
  • 100% full offset account
  • Suitable for low deposits
  • Extra repayments and redraw facility
  • Ongoing fee
  • Discharge fee at end of loan
  • No repayment holidays

Beyond Bank Features and Fees

Details

Maximum LVR
95%
Total Repayments
Next LVR
Interest rate type
Variable
Borrowing range
Suitable for
Owner Occupiers
Loan term range
5 - 30 years
Principal & interest
Interest only
Applicable states
ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC, WA
Make repayments
Fortnightly, Monthly, Weekly

Features

Extra repayments
Yes - unlimited extra repayments
Redraw facility

Redraw fee: $0

Split interest facility
Loan portable

Repayment holiday available

Allow guarantors

Available for first home buyers

Fees

Total estimated upfront fees
$0
Application fee
$0
Valuation fee
At Cost
Settlement fee
$0
Other upfront fee
$0
Ongoing fee
$395 annually
Discharge fee
$295

Application method

Online
Phone

In branch

Beyond Bank is available through brokers

Liz Zaki
5.0
65 Reviews
Liz is an experienced and independent Mortgage Broker with 17 years experience. She is the Founder and Managing Director of OneSite Finance in Sydney. Liz is all about the customer experience. She delivers independent, high-quality advice, implementation and continuous support. Liz prides herself on building long term client relationships in order to achieve long term successful outcomes. This is reflected in the 143 real 5-star reviews OneSite has amassed on Google over the last 5 years. Additionally, Liz has one of the highest customer retention rates of all the brokers who operate under the PLAN Australia* umbrella. Liz specialises in residential home loans, construction loans, business & SMSF finance. She particularly enjoys guiding First Home Buyers, helping them make their property ownership dreams come true. Throughout her time in the Mortgage Industry, she has received a number of high profile awards. Liz has been named in the Top 40 Australia Elite Business Writers 2009. She has featured heavily in PLAN Australia's Excellence in Finance Awards since 2007 culminating in being inducted into PLAN Australia's Hall of Fame in 2019. Liz is a Justice of the Peace which comes in handy when you need mortgage documents witnessed. She holds a Diploma in Finance and Mortgage Broking, as well as a Bachelor of Bioprocess Engineering from UNSW. * PLAN Australia is one of Australia's largest mortgage aggregators, representing in excess of 3,000 brokers around Australia.
NSW2010
CRN: 398963

FAQs

How do I refinance my home loan?

Refinancing your home loan can involve a bit of paperwork but if you are moving on to a lower rate, it can save you thousands of dollars in the long-run. The first step is finding another loan on the market that you think will save you money over time or offer features that your current loan does not have. Once you have selected a couple of loans you are interested in, compare them with your current loan to see if you will save money in the long term on interest rates and fees. Remember to factor in any break fees and set up fees when assessing the cost of switching.

Once you have decided on a new loan it is simply a matter of contacting your existing and future lender to get the new loan set up. Beware that some lenders will revert your loan back to a 25 or 30 year term when you refinance which may mean initial lower repayments but may cost you more in the long run.

Can I change jobs while I am applying for a home loan?

Whether you’re a new borrower or you’re refinancing your home loan, many lenders require you to be in a permanent job with the same employer for at least 6 months before applying for a home loan. Different lenders have different requirements. 

If your work situation changes for any reason while you’re applying for a mortgage, this could reduce your chances of successfully completing the process. Contacting the lender as soon as you know your employment situation is changing may allow you to work something out. 

What is a variable home loan?

A variable rate home loan is one where the interest rate can and will change over the course of your loan. The rate is determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, so while the cash rate might go down, your bank may decide not to follow suit, although they do broadly follow market conditions. One of the upsides of variable rates is that they are typically more flexible than their fixed rate counterparts which means that a lot of these products will let you make extra repayments and offer features such as offset accounts.

What is a debt service ratio?

A method of gauging a borrower’s home loan serviceability (ability to afford home loan repayments), the debt service ratio (DSR) is the fraction of an applicant’s income that will need to go towards paying back a loan. The DSR is typically expressed as a percentage, and lenders may decline loans to borrowers with too high a DSR (often over 30 per cent).

Who has the best home loan?

Determining who has the ‘best’ home loan really does depend on your own personal circumstances and requirements. It may be tempting to judge a loan merely on the interest rate but there can be added value in the extras on offer, such as offset and redraw facilities, that aren’t available with all low rate loans.

To determine which loan is the best for you, think about whether you would prefer the consistency of a fixed loan or the flexibility and potential benefits of a variable loan. Then determine which features will be necessary throughout the life of your loan. Thirdly, consider how much you are willing to pay in fees for the loan you want. Once you find the perfect combination of these three elements you are on your way to determining the best loan for you. 

What if I can't pay off my guaranteed home loan?

If you can’t pay off your guaranteed home loan, your lender might chase your guarantor for the money.

A guaranteed home loan is a legally binding agreement in which the guarantor assumes overall responsibility for the mortgage. So if the borrower falls behind on their mortgage, the lender might insist that the guarantor cover the repayments. If the guarantor fails to do so, the lender might seize the guarantor’s security (which is often the family home) so it can recoup its money.

How do I take out a low-deposit home loan?

If you want to take out a low-deposit home loan, it might be a good idea to consult a mortgage broker who can give you professional financial advice and organise the mortgage for you.

Another way to take out a low-deposit home loan is to do your own research with a comparison website like RateCity. Once you’ve identified your preferred mortgage, you can apply through RateCity or go direct to the lender.

What are extra repayments?

Additional payments to your home loan above the minimum monthly instalments, which can help to reduce the loan’s term and remaining payable interest.

How can I get a home loan with bad credit?

If you want to get a home loan with bad credit, you need to convince a lender that your problems are behind you and that you will, indeed, be able to repay a mortgage.

One step you might want to take is to visit a mortgage broker who specialises in bad credit home loans (also known as ‘non-conforming home loans’ or ‘sub-prime home loans’). An experienced broker will know which lenders to approach, and how to plead your case with each of them.

Two points to bear in mind are:

  • Many home loan lenders don’t provide bad credit mortgages
  • Each lender has its own policies, and therefore favours different things

If you’d prefer to directly approach the lender yourself, you’re more likely to find success with smaller non-bank lenders that specialise in bad credit home loans (as opposed to bigger banks that prefer ‘vanilla’ mortgages). That’s because these smaller lenders are more likely to treat you as a unique individual rather than judge you according to a one-size-fits-all policy.

Lenders try to minimise their risk, so if you want to get a home loan with bad credit, you need to do everything you can to convince lenders that you’re safer than your credit history might suggest. If possible, provide paperwork that shows:

  • You have a secure job
  • You have a steady income
  • You’ve been reducing your debts
  • You’ve been increasing your savings

Who offers 40 year mortgages?

Home loans spanning 40 years are offered by select lenders, though the loan period is much longer than a standard 30-year home loan. You're more likely to find a maximum of 35 years, such as is the case with Teacher’s Mutual Bank

Currently, 40 year home loan lenders in Australia include AlphaBeta Money, BCU, G&C Mutual Bank, Pepper, and Sydney Mutual Bank.

Even though these lengthier loans 35 to 40 year loans do exist on the market, they are not overwhelmingly popular, as the extra interest you pay compared to a 30-year loan can be over $100,000 or more.

What is a credit limit?

The maximum amount that can be borrowed from a lender, as per the home loan contract.

What is equity? How can I use equity in my home loan?

Equity refers to the difference between what your property is worth and how much you owe on it. Essentially, it is the amount you have repaid on your home loan to date, although if your property has gone up in value it can sometimes be a lot more.

You can use the equity in your home loan to finance renovations on your existing property or as a deposit on an investment property. It can also be accessed for other investment opportunities or smaller purchases, such as a car or holiday, using a redraw facility.

Once you are over 65 you can even use the equity in your home loan as a source of income by taking out a reverse mortgage. This will let you access the equity in your loan in the form of regular payments which will be paid back to the bank following your death by selling your property. But like all financial products, it’s best to seek professional advice before you sign on the dotted line.

How do I know if I have to pay LMI?

Each lender has its own policies, but as a general rule you will have to pay lender’s mortgage insurance (LMI) if your loan-to-value ratio (LVR) exceeds 80 per cent. This applies whether you’re taking out a new home loan or you’re refinancing.

If you’re looking to buy a property, you can use this LMI calculator to work out how much you’re likely to be charged in LMI.

What happens to my home loan when interest rates rise?

If you are on a variable rate home loan, every so often your rate will be subject to increases and decreases. Rate changes are determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, however often when the RBA changes the cash rate, a number of banks will follow suit, at least to some extent. You can use RateCity cash rate to check how the latest interest rate change affected your mortgage interest rate.

When your rate rises, you will be required to pay your bank more each month in mortgage repayments. Similarly, if your interest rate is cut, then your monthly repayments will decrease. Your lender will notify you of what your new repayments will be, although you can do the calculations yourself, and compare other home loan rates using our mortgage calculator.

There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.

What happens when you default on your mortgage?

A mortgage default occurs when you are 90 days or more behind on your mortgage repayments. Late repayments will often incur a late fee on top of the amount owed which will continue to gather interest along with the remaining principal amount.

If you do default on a mortgage repayment you should try and catch up in next month’s payment. If this isn’t possible, and missing payments is going to become a regular issue, you need to contact your lender as soon as possible to organise an alternative payment schedule and discuss further options.

You may also want to talk to a financial counsellor. 

How personalised is my rating?

Real Time Ratings produces instant scores for loan products and updates them based what you tell us about what you’re looking for in a loan. In that sense, we believe the ratings are as close as you get to personalised; the more you tell us, the more we customise to ratings to your needs. Some borrowers value flexibility, while others want the lowest cost loan. Your preferences will be reflected in the rating. 

We also take a shorter term, more realistic view of how long borrowers hold onto their loan, which gives you a better idea about the true borrowing costs. We take your loan details and calculate how much each of the relevent loans would cost you on average each month over the next five years. We assess the overall flexibility of each loan and give you an easy indication of which ones are likely to adjust to your needs over time. 

How often is your data updated?

We work closely with lenders to get updates as quick as possible, with updates made the same day wherever possible.

How can I get a home loan with no deposit?

Following the Global Financial Crisis, no-deposit loans, as they once used to be known, have largely been removed from the market. Now, if you wish to enter the market with no deposit, you will require a property of your own to secure a loan against or the assistance of a guarantor.

How much of the RBA rate cut do lenders pass on to borrowers?

When the Reserve Bank of Australia cuts its official cash rate, there is no guarantee lenders will then pass that cut on to lenders by way of lower interest rates. 

Sometimes lenders pass on the cut in full, sometimes they partially pass on the cut, sometimes they don’t at all. When they don’t, they often defend the decision by saying they need to balance the needs of their shareholders with the needs of their borrowers. 

As the attached graph shows, more recent cuts have seen less lenders passing on the full RBA interest rate cut; the average lender was more likely to pass on about two-thirds of the 25 basis points cut to its borrowers.  image002

What is 'principal and interest'?

‘Principal and interest’ loans are the most common type of home loans on the market. The principal part of the loan is the initial sum lent to the customer and the interest is the money paid on top of this, at the agreed interest rate, until the end of the loan.

By reducing the principal amount, the total of interest charged will also become smaller until eventually the debt is paid off in full.