Confident consumers prefer personal loans

Confident consumers prefer personal loans

By Jack Han
February 8, 2010

Personal loans are on the rise, as Australia’s economy steadies toward a full recovery. However, major banks are the ones enjoying the fruits of consumer confidence, while the rest are left with more to desire.

Recent lending statistics show that fixed term borrowing for the purchase of cars, boats and travel has increased by 38 percent since November 2008 to November 2009, where it reached its lowest point during the financial crisis.

However, the majority of the growth has been seized by the banks, who recorded an increase in personal lending of 57 percent for the same period, while non-banks saw personal lending take a dive of 13 percent.

In particular, new car personal loans rose 8 percent, boat loans 19 percent, and unsecured personal loans for the purchase of land jumped 50 percent.

This is evidence of improving employment conditions and stable lending interest rates, which are giving Australians the confidence to borrow more for major purchases. Earlier this month, the Reserve Bank decided to stall the cash rate at its current level of 3.75 percent, leaving many to believe that interest rates will rise at a much lower pace than anticipated this year.

Despite the large interest rate disparity, personal loans have the advantage of convenience over home loans, making them a very flexible lending option for those who want easier access to funds.

Lenders have caught on to the shifting tides of personal loans, and have already began competing to offer the lowest rates in a bid to attract new customers. Currently, the cheapest secured personal loans offered at RateCity are below 10 percent, while unsecured loans feature rates around 14 percent.

A difference of 4 percent on a $20,000 loan over five years translates to about $40 a month or almost $500 per year, which means that comparing personal loans is crucial for any borrower wishing to save potentially thousands of dollars on their loan.

Personal loans are best suited for borrowers who plan to repay the loan within a few years, so make sure your repayment schedule minimises the interest you owe, which could build quickly over time. The lending game is changing, but banks shouldn’t have all the fun. Take your time to compare the best offers in the market, and lock in a deal that turns the tide in your favour.

 

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Learn more about personal loans

Do student personal loans require security?

While some personal loans can be secured by the value of an asset, such as a car or equity in a property, student personal loans are often unsecured, which typically have higher interest rates.

Some lenders also offer guarantor personal loans to students. These loans have lower interest rates, as a guarantor (usually a relative of the borrower with good credit) will fully or partially guarantee the loan, taking on the financial responsibility if the borrower defaults.

Can you refinance a $5000 personal loan?

Much like home loans, many personal loans can be refinanced. This is where you replace your current personal loan with another personal loan, often from another lender and at a lower interest rate. Switching personal loans may let you enjoy more affordable repayments, or useful features and benefits.

If you have a $5000 personal loan as well as other debts, you may be able to use a debt consolidations personal loan to combine these debts into one, potentially saving you money and simplifying your repayments.

What are the pros and cons of personal loans?

The advantages of personal loans are that they’re easier to obtain than mortgages and usually have lower interest rates than credit cards.

One disadvantage with personal loans is that you have to go through a formal application process, unlike when you borrow money on your credit card. Another disadvantage is that you’ll be charged a higher interest rate than if you borrowed the money as part of a mortgage.

Can I get a no credit check personal loan?

Personal loans with no credit checks are available and called ‘payday loans’. These are sometimes used as short-term solutions for cash-strapped Australians. They often carry higher interest rates and fees than regular personal loans, and individuals risk putting themselves into a worsened cycle of debt.

How much can you borrow with a bad credit personal loan?

Borrowers who take out bad credit personal loans don’t just pay higher interest rates than on regular personal loans, they also get loaned less money. Each lender has its own policies and loan limits, but you’ll find it hard to get approved for a bad credit personal loan above $50,000.

What is a bad credit personal loan?

A bad credit personal loan is a personal loan designed for somebody with a bad credit history. This type of personal loan has higher interest rates than regular personal loans as well as higher fees.

Should I get a fixed or variable personal loan?

Fixed personal loans keep your interest rate the same for the full loan term, while interest rates on variable personal loans may be raised or lowered during your loan term.

A fixed rate personal loan keeps your repayments consistent, which can help keep your budgeting consistent. You won't have to worry about higher repayments if your rates were to rise. However, on a fixed loan you’ll also potentially miss out on more affordable repayments if variable rates were to fall.

What is the average interest rate on personal loans for single parents?

Like other types of personal loans, the average interest rate for personal loans for single parents changes regularly, as lenders add, remove, and vary their loan offers. The interest rate you’ll receive may depend on a range of different factors, including your loan amount, loan term, security, income, and credit score.

What is an unsecured bad credit personal loan?

A bad credit personal loan is ‘unsecured’ when the borrower doesn’t offer up an asset, such as a car or jewellery, as collateral or security. Lenders generally charge higher interest rates on unsecured loans than secured loans.

What are the pros and cons of bad credit personal loans?

In some instances, bad credit personal loans can help people with bad credit history to consolidate their debts, which can help make it easier for them to clear those debts. This is because the borrower might be able to consolidate several debts with higher interest rates (such as credit card loans) into one single debt with a lower interest rate and potentially fewer fees.

However, this strategy can backfire if the borrower spends the loaned funds instead of using it to repay the new loan. Another disadvantage of bad credit personal loans is that they have higher interest rates than regular personal loans.

Can single mothers get personal loans online?

Many lenders offer online applications for personal loans, which can be convenient for borrowers who have busy lives. If you’re not confident your personal loan application will be approved, you may want to consider contacting the lender by email, live chat, phone, or by visiting a branch, to discuss your situation before applying.

Are there low doc personal loans?

Self-employed borrowers may be eligible for low doc personal loans, which require less documentation in their application process than many other personal loan options.

It’s important to remember that though low doc personal loans may require less paperwork, you may need to provide additional security, or pay a higher interest rate.

What do single parents need for a personal loan application?

Much like applying for other personal loans, applying for personal loans for single parents will likely require the following:

  • Proof of identity
  • Proof of residence
  • Proof of income
  • Details of assets (e.g. car, home)
  • Details of liabilities (e.g. credit cards, other loans)
  • Loan amount
  • Loan term

How long are $3000 loans?

Medium amount loans can be repaid between 16 days and 2 years. Many personal loans have terms between 1 year and 5 years, though some are as short as 6 months while others last for 10 years.

Generally, the shorter a loan’s term, the more expensive your regular repayments may be, but the less total interest you’ll pay. Loans with longer terms mean more affordable repayments, but more interest charges over the full term.