QSuper

QSuper Lifetime

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No. of members: 599028
Fund size: $97.1b
Public offer:
Product type: Government-MySuper
Target market: All Industries
Year started: 2013

RateCity Says: Enjoy the benefits of an investment strategy based on your age and account balance.

Past 5-year return
6.43%
Admin fee

$0

Calc fees on 50k

$370

SuperRatings awards
MySuper Platinum7 Year Platinum PerformanceFund of the YearNet Benefit Finalist Smooth RideMySuper of the Year Finalist
Past 5-year return
6.43%
Admin fee

$0

Calc fees on 50k

$370

SuperRatings awards
MySuper Platinum7 Year Platinum PerformanceFund of the YearNet Benefit Finalist Smooth RideMySuper of the Year Finalist
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Pros and Cons

Pros and Cons

  • Access to subsidised financial planning and an award-winning contact centre.
  • Flexible insurance options with coverage to age 70.
  • Extensive seminars program (over 550 free seminars per annum) including metropolitan and regional offerings.

Summary

Winner of the 2021 Fund of the Year award, QSuper is one of Australia's largest and oldest superannuation funds and was originally established to provide for the retirement needs of Queensland Government employees. The fund is now a public offer fund and allows members from all industries to apply for membership. QSuper was the winner of the 2021 Smooth Ride award and was also nominated as a finalist for the 2021 MySuper of the Year and the 2021 Net Benefit awards.QSuper Lifetime, the fund's MySuper compliant investment strategy, offers a lifecycle investment approach to provide a tailored investment strategy that considers a member's age and their QSuper Lifetime balance. Choice members may also select from 5 Diversified and 4 Single Sector options, as well as, Self Invest, which provides access to Direct Shares listed on the S&P/ASX 300, a range of Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) and Term Deposits. The QSuper Lifetime Outlook option outperformed the relevant SuperRatings Index over the 3- and 5-year periods to 30 June 2020.Fees are lower than the industry average across all account balances assessed. Administration fees paid in excess of $900 are refunded to the member in July of the following financial year. The fund does not charge an investment switching fee or a buy sell spread.QSuper's insurance offering allows eligible members to apply for up to $3 million of Death cover and up to $3 million of Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) cover. Income Protection with a benefit period of 2 years, 5 years or to age 65, covering up to 87.75% of salary, is available following a 30-, 60- or 90-day waiting period.The fund offers high quality educational material, interactive tools and calculators, as well as seminars at no additional cost. Further, members are able to view and update account details, as well as perform transactions through the secure Member Online portal.

Features and Fees

QSuper Fees and Features

Features

Variety of options

Binding nominations

Account size discount

Online Access

Home loans

Financial planning service

Non-lapsing binding nominations

Employer size discount

Anti-detriment payments

Credit cards

Insurance Cover

Health insurance

Insurance life event increases

Total and permanent disability cover

Long term income protection

Fees

Admin fee

$0

Administration fee (%)

0.16%

Switching fee

$0

Investment fee

0.45%

Indirect cost ratio (%)

0.13%

Exit fee

$0

Pros and Cons

  • Access to subsidised financial planning and an award-winning contact centre.
  • Flexible insurance options with coverage to age 70.
  • Extensive seminars program (over 550 free seminars per annum) including metropolitan and regional offerings.

Winner of the 2021 Fund of the Year award, QSuper is one of Australia's largest and oldest superannuation funds and was originally established to provide for the retirement needs of Queensland Government employees. The fund is now a public offer fund and allows members from all industries to apply for membership. QSuper was the winner of the 2021 Smooth Ride award and was also nominated as a finalist for the 2021 MySuper of the Year and the 2021 Net Benefit awards.QSuper Lifetime, the fund's MySuper compliant investment strategy, offers a lifecycle investment approach to provide a tailored investment strategy that considers a member's age and their QSuper Lifetime balance. Choice members may also select from 5 Diversified and 4 Single Sector options, as well as, Self Invest, which provides access to Direct Shares listed on the S&P/ASX 300, a range of Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) and Term Deposits. The QSuper Lifetime Outlook option outperformed the relevant SuperRatings Index over the 3- and 5-year periods to 30 June 2020.Fees are lower than the industry average across all account balances assessed. Administration fees paid in excess of $900 are refunded to the member in July of the following financial year. The fund does not charge an investment switching fee or a buy sell spread.QSuper's insurance offering allows eligible members to apply for up to $3 million of Death cover and up to $3 million of Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) cover. Income Protection with a benefit period of 2 years, 5 years or to age 65, covering up to 87.75% of salary, is available following a 30-, 60- or 90-day waiting period.The fund offers high quality educational material, interactive tools and calculators, as well as seminars at no additional cost. Further, members are able to view and update account details, as well as perform transactions through the secure Member Online portal.

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QSuper Fees and Features

Features

Variety of options

Binding nominations

Account size discount

Online Access

Home loans

Financial planning service

Non-lapsing binding nominations

Employer size discount

Anti-detriment payments

Credit cards

Insurance Cover

Health insurance

Insurance life event increases

Total and permanent disability cover

Long term income protection

Fees

Admin fee

$0

Administration fee (%)

0.16%

Switching fee

$0

Investment fee

0.45%

Indirect cost ratio (%)

0.13%

Exit fee

$0
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Fund fees vs. Industry average
THIS FUND
INDUSTRY AVERAGE
Fund past-5-year return vs. Industry average
THIS FUND
INDUSTRY AVERAGE
Investment allocation
INTERNATIONAL SHARES
AUSTRALIAN SHARES
PROPERTY
ALTERNATIVES
FIXED INTEREST
CASH
OTHER
Investment option performance
BALANCED
CONSERVATIVE BALANCE
SECURE
CAPITAL STABLE
+ View additional option performance information
Past 5-year return
6.13%
Admin fee

$0

Company
QSuper
Calc fees on 50k

$320

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Platinum15 Year Platinum PerformanceFund of the YearNet Benefit Finalist Smooth RideChoice Super of the Year Finalist
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More details

FAQs

What contributions can SMSFs accept?

SMSFs can accept mandated employer contributions from an employer at any time (Funds need an electronic service address to receive the contributions).

However, SMSFs can’t accept contributions from members who don’t have tax file numbers.

Also, they generally can’t accept assets as contributions from members and they generally can’t accept non-mandated contributions for members who are 75 or older.

How much is superannuation?

Superannuation is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How do I combine several superannuation accounts into one account?

The process used to consolidate several superannuation accounts into one is the same process used to change superannuation funds. This can be done through your MyGov account or by filling out a rollover form and sending it to your chosen fund.

How do you find lost superannuation funds?

Lost superannuation refers to savings in an account that you’ve forgotten about. This can happen if you’ve opened several different accounts over the years while moving from job to job.

You can use your MyGov account to see details of all your superannuation accounts, including any you might have forgotten. Alternatively, you can fill in a ‘Searching for lost super’ form and send it to the Australian Taxation Office, which will then search on your behalf.

What fees do superannuation funds charge?

Superannuation funds can charge a range of fees, including:

  • Activity-based fees – for specific, irregular services, such as splitting an account after a divorce
  • Administration fees – to cover the cost of managing your account
  • Advice fees – for personal investment advice
  • Buy/sell spread fees – when you make contributions, switches and withdrawals
  • Exit fees – when you close your account
  • Investment fees – to cover the cost of managing your investments
  • Switching fees – when you choose a new investment option within the same fund

What is MySuper?

MySuper accounts are basic, low-fee accounts. If you don’t nominate a superannuation fund, your employer must choose one for you that offers a MySuper account.

MySuper accounts offer two investment options:

  1. Single diversified investment strategy

Your fund assigns you a risk strategy and investment profile, which remain unchanged throughout your working life.

  1. Lifecycle investment strategy

Your fund assigns you an investment strategy based on your age, and then changes it as you get older. Younger workers are given strategies that emphasise growth assets

What is superannuation?

Superannuation is money set aside for your retirement. This money is automatically paid into your superannuation fund by your employer.

How can I increase my superannuation?

You can increase your superannuation through a ‘salary sacrifice’. This is where your employer takes part of your pre-tax salary and pays it directly into your superannuation account. Like regular superannuation contributions, salary sacrifices are taxed at 15 per cent when they are paid into the fund.

What age can I withdraw my superannuation?

You can withdraw your superannuation (or at least some of it) when you reach ‘preservation age’. The preservation age is based on date of birth. Here are the six different categories:

Date of birth Preservation age
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964 59
From 1 July 1964 60

When you reach preservation age, you can withdraw all your superannuation if you’re retired. If you’re still working, you can begin a ‘transition to retirement’, which allows you to withdraw 10 per cent of their superannuation each financial year.

You can also withdraw all your superannuation once you reach 65 years.

What superannuation details do I give to my employer?

When you start a job, your employer will give you what’s called a ‘superannuation standard choice form’. Here’s what you need to complete the form:

  • The name of your preferred superannuation fund
  • The fund’s address
  • The fund’s Australian business number (ABN)
  • The fund’s superannuation product identification number (SPIN)
  • The fund’s phone number
  • A letter from the fund trustee confirming that the fund is a complying fund; or written evidence from the fund stating it will accept contributions from your new employer; or details about how your employer can make contributions to the fund

You should also provide your tax file number – while it’s not a legal obligation, it will ensure your contributions will be taxed at the (lower) superannuation rate.

How does superannuation work?

Superannuation is paid by employers to employees, at least once every three months. The ‘superannuation guarantee’ is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary. The guarantee is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Superannuation is generally taxed at 15 per cent. However, if you earn less than $37,000, you will be automatically reimbursed up to $500 of the tax you paid. Also, if your income plus concessional superannuation contributions exceed $250,000, you will also be charged Division 293 tax. This is an extra 15 per cent tax on your concessional contributions or the amount above $250,000 – whichever is lesser.

You can withdraw your superannuation when you meet the ‘conditions of release’. The conditions of release say you can claim your super when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

 

How much extra superannuation can I add to my fund?

There is an annual limit of $25,000 for concessional contributions – that is, money paid by your employer and extra money you pay into your account through salary sacrificing. There is also a limit on non-concessional contributions. Australians aged between 65 and 74 have a limit of $100,000 per year. Australians aged under 65 have a limit of $300,000 every three years.

How much is superannuation in Australia?

Superannuation in Australia is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

What are the age pension's age rules?

Australians must be aged at least 65 years and 6 months to access the age pension. This eligibility age is scheduled to increase according to the following schedule:

Date Eligibility age
1 July 2019 66 years
1 July 2021 66 years and 6 months
1 July 2023 67 years

Am I entitled to superannuation if I'm a casual employee?

As a casual employee, you’re entitled to superannuation if:

  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

Do I have to pay myself superannuation if I'm self-employed?

No, self-employed workers don’t have to pay themselves superannuation. However, if you do pay yourself superannuation, you will probably be able to claim a tax deduction.

Is superannuation paid on overtime?

As the Australian Taxation Office explains, there are times when superannuation is paid on overtime and times when it isn’t.

Here is the ATO’s summary:

Payment type Is superannuation paid?
Overtime hours – award stipulates ordinary hours to be worked and employee works additional hours for which they are paid overtime rates No
Overtime hours – agreement prevails over award No
Agreement supplanting award removes distinction between ordinary hours and other hours Yes – all hours worked
No ordinary hours of work stipulated Yes – all hours worked
Casual employee: shift loadings Yes
Casual employee: overtime payments No
Casual employee whose hours are paid at overtime rates due to a ‘bandwidth’ clause No
Piece-rates – no ordinary hours of work stipulated Yes
Overtime component of earnings based on hourly-driving-rate method stipulated in award No

When did superannuation start in Australia?

Australia’s modern superannuation system – in which employers make compulsory contributions to their employees – started in 1992. However, before that, there were various restricted superannuation schemes applying to certain employees in certain industries. The very first superannuation scheme was introduced in the 19th century.

How do I choose the right superannuation fund?

Different superannuation funds charge different fees, offer different insurances, offer different investment options and have different performance histories.

So you need to ask yourself these four questions when comparing superannuation funds:

  • How many fees would I have to pay and what would they cost?
  • What insurances are available and how much would they cost?
  • What investment options does it offer? How would they match my risk profile and financial needs?
  • How have these investment options performed historically?

How do you claim superannuation?

There are three different ways you can claim your superannuation:

  • Lump sum
  • Account-based pension
  • Part lump sum and part account-based pension

Two rules apply if you choose to receive an account-based pension, or income stream:

  • You must receive payments at least once per year
  • You must withdraw a minimum amount per year
    • Age 55-64 = 4%
    • Age 65-74 = 5%
    • Age 75-79 = 6%
    • Age 80-84 = 7%
    • Age 85-89 = 9%
    • Age 90-94 = 11%
    • Age 95+ = 14%

If you want to work out how long your account-based pension might last, click here to access ASIC’s account-based pension calculator.