Pet spending around the world

Pet spending around the world

America

Pet industry revenue – 2013-18 (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • 4.4% average annual growth

Pet industry revenue by category (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • Food 41.8%
  • Veterinary care 24.6%
  • Supplies/over-the-counter medicine 21.7%
  • Grooming and boarding 8.9%
  • Live animal purchases 3.0%

Pet ownership (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • 68% have pets
  • 48% have dogs
  • 38% have cats
  • 10% have freshwater fish
  • 6% have birds
  • 4% have reptiles
  • 2% have saltwater fish

Average annual spending per pet (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • Dogs US$1,678
  • Cats US$1,116
  • Fish US$750
  • Birds US$1,367
  • Rabbits US$780
  • Mice/rats US$960

Australia

Pet industry revenue – 2013-18 (source: IbisWorld)

  • 7.4% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • 62% have pets
  • 38% have dogs
  • 29% have cats
  • 12% have fish
  • 12% have birds
  • 3% have reptiles
  • 3% have small mammals

Buying cats (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Average cost A$274
  • 52% were free

Buying dogs (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Average cost A$548
  • 30% were free

Average annual spending per pet (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Dogs A$1,475
  • Cats A$1,029
  • Fish A$50
  • Birds A$115
  • Reptiles A$381
  • Small mammals A$224

Pet spending by category (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Food 34.6%
  • Veterinary services 18.4%
  • Pet healthcare products 11.8%
  • Products or accessories 8.9%
  • Clipping/grooming 4.7%
  • Other 21.6%

Don’t have a pet? (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • 59% of petless households want a pet in the near future

Argentina

Dog food revenue – 2012-17 (source: Apertura.com)

  • 9% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 82% have pets
  • 66% have dogs
  • 32% have cats
  • 8% have fish
  • 7% have birds

Brazil

Pet care revenue – 2012-17 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 10% average annual growth

Pet food revenue – 2018-23 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 7.5% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 76% have pets
  • 58% have dogs
  • 28% have cats
  • 11% have birds
  • 7% have fish

Canada

Pet care revenue – 2014-20(source: Research and Markets)

  • 3.7% average annual growth forecast

Vet healthcare revenue – 2018-23(source: Mordor Intelligence)

  • 7.2% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership(source: GFK)

  • 61% have pets
  • 35% have cats
  • 33% have dogs
  • 9% have fish
  • 4% have birds

Cost of a pet in the first 12 months (source: RateSupermarket.ca)

  • Dog C$2,600
  • Cat C$1,921

Cost of annual pet insurance (source: RateSupermarket.ca)

  • Dog C$592
  • Cat C$357

China

Vet care and supplies revenue (source: Euromonitor)

  • 27% annual growth in 2017

Pet industry revenue – 2018-23 (source: Euromonitor)

  • 21.5% average annual growth forecast

Average annual spending per pet (source: Pet Fair Asia White Paper)

  • Dogs 5,508 yuan
  • Cats 4,311 yuan

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 47% have pets
  • 25% have dogs
  • 17% have fish
  • 10% have cats
  • 5% have birds

France

Pet food revenue – 2018-21 (source: Statista)

  • 3.7% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 65% have pets
  • 41% have cats
  • 29% have dogs
  • 12% have fish
  • 5% have birds

Germany

Pet care revenue – 2016 (source: ZZF)

  • 2.5% annual growth for pet accessories
  • 0.9% annual growth for prepared pet food

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 53% have pets
  • 29% have cats
  • 21% have dogs
  • 9% have fish
  • 6% have birds

India

Pet population – 2006-11 (source: Indian Pet and Equine Industry)

  • 7.4% average annual growth

Pet care revenue – 2012-17 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 23% average annual growth

Pet care revenue – FY18-22 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 20% average annual growth forecast

Pet food revenue – 2017-22 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 18% average annual growth forecast

Indonesia

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 2.7% average annual growth

Pet food revenue – 2018-21 (source: Statista)

  • 8.6% average annual growth forecast

Italy

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 3.1% average annual growth

Pet products revenue – 2015 (source: Export.gov)

  • 6.6% annual decline

Households with cats (source: Pets International)

  • 5.8% decline from 2013-17

Households with dogs (source: Pets International)

  • 10.5% growth from 2013-17

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 67% have pets
  • 39% have dogs
  • 34% have cats
  • 11% have fish
  • 8% have birds

Japan

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 5.1% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 37% have pets
  • 17% have dogs
  • 14% have cats
  • 9% have fish
  • 2% have birds

Asia-Pacific pet healthcare market share (source: Research and Markets)

  • 50.4% Japan
  • 49.6% other

Mexico

Pet numbers – 2014-17 (source: GFK)

  • 4% growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 81% have pets
  • 64% have dogs
  • 24% have cats
  • 10% have fish
  • 10% have birds

Average annual spending per pet (source: Statista)

  • 16884 pesos

Pet spending by category (source: Statista)

  • Food 35.9%
  • Veterinary services 23.6%
  • Hygiene 11.9%
  • Travel 6.8%
  • Treats 6.4%
  • Toys 6.3%
  • Daycare/boarding 4.9%
  • Accessories 4.3%

New Zealand

Pet industry revenue – 2011-16 (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • 2.4% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • 64% have pets
  • 44% have cats
  • 28% have dogs
  • 10% have fish
  • 7% have birds
  • 3% have rabbits

Don’t have a pet? (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • 58% of people who don’t have a pet would like one

Desexing (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats 93%
  • Dogs 75%

Microchipping (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats 31%
  • Dogs 71%

Insurance (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats 10%
  • Dogs 19%

Average annual spending per pet (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats NZ$670
  • Dogs NZ$1,200

Russia

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 9.3% average annual growth

Pet food revenue – 2016-22 (source: Mordor Intelligence)

  • 1.7% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 74% have pets
  • 29% have dogs
  • 57% have cats
  • 11% have fish
  • 9% have birds

Saudi Arabia

By the numbers

  • 2008 - the year religious police banned the sale of cats and dogs (source: Arabian Business)
  • 2 dogs per 1,000 people - one of the lowest rates in the world (source: Euromonitor)
  • 6.2% - forecast average annual growth of cat food market in 2018-23 (source: Research and Markets)

South Africa

Pet industry revenue – 2012-17 (source: Pets International)

  • 1.9% average annual growth

Pet population (source: Euromonitor)

  • Cats 2.4 million
  • Dogs 9.1 million

South Korea

Pet industry revenue – 2012-15 (source: Koisra)

  • 29.1% average annual growth

Pet industry revenue – 2015-20 (source: Koisra)

  • 24.6% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 32% have pets
  • 20% have dogs
  • 7% have fish
  • 6% have cats
  • 1% have birds

Turkey

Pet industry revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 5.8% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 50% have pets
  • 20% have birds
  • 16% have fish
  • 15% have cats
  • 12% have dogs

UK

Pet ownership (source: Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association)

  • 45% have pets
  • 26% have dogs
  • 18% have cats
  • 2% have rabbits
  • 1% have indoor birds
  • 1% have guinea pigs
  • 1% have hamsters

Pet obesity rate (source: Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association)

  • 52% dogs
  • 47% cats
  • 32% small mammals
  • 12% birds

Pet food revenue – 2018-23 (source: Mintel)

  • 2.6% average annual growth forecast

Pet care revenue – 2018-23 (source: Mintel)

  • 4.5% average annual growth forecast

Average annual spending per pet (source: More Than)

  • Dogs £2,880
  • Cats £1,200

It’s me or the dog (source: Mintel)

  • 51% of pet owners would rather reduce spending on themselves than their pets

World

Survey of 27,000 people in 22 countries found... (source: GFK)

  • 57% have pets
  • 33% have dogs
  • 23% have cats
  • 12% have fish
  • 6% have birds

Most pets (source: GFK)

  • Argentina 82%
  • Mexico 81%
  • Brazil 76%

Fewest pets (source: GFK)

  • South Korea 32%
  • Hong Kong 36%
  • Japan 37%

Most popular country for... (source: GFK)

  • Dogs - Argentina 66%
  • Cats - Russia 57%
  • Fish - China 17%
  • Birds - Turkey 20%

Pet industry revenue – fastest average annual growth rates, 2012-17 (source: Pets International)

  • India 16.3%
  • China 14.7%
  • Thailand 12.2%
  • Vietnam 12.2%
  • Chile 9.9%
  • South Korea 8.2%
  • Bulgaria 7.7%
  • Egypt 7.5%
  • Philippines 7.4%
  • Saudi Arabia 7.4%

Pet industry revenue – average annual growth rates, 2012-17 (source: Pets International)

  • Asia Pacific 6.9%
  • Eastern Europe 5.4%
  • Middle East & Africa 5.4%
  • Latin America 3.4%
  • North America 1.8%
  • Western Europe 0.8%
  • Australasia 0.6%

Pet industry revenue – market share per region (source: Pets International)

  • North America 44.4%
  • Western Europe 26.0%
  • Asia Pacific 10.5%
  • Latin America 9.9%
  • Eastern Europe 5.2%
  • Australasia 3.0%
  • Middle East & Africa 0.8%

Cats v dogs (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • South Africa 370 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Argentina 307 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Czech Republic 180 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Australia 168 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Japan 164 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Spain 139 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Poland 132 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Hungary 128 dogs for every 100 cats
  • UK 113 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Romania 107 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Italy 95 dogs for every 100 cats
  • America 94 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Russia 70 dogs for every 100 cats
  • France 66 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Germany 65 dogs for every 100 cats
  • China 52 dogs for every 100 cats

Most cats (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • USA 74.1 million
  • China 53.1 million
  • Russia 17.8 million
  • Brazil 12.5 million
  • France 11.5 million
  • Germany 8.2 million
  • UK 8.0 million
  • Italy 7.4 million
  • Ukraine 7.4 million
  • Japan 7.3 million

Most dogs (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • USA 69.9 million
  • Brazil 35.8 million
  • China 27.4 million
  • Russia 12.5 million
  • Japan 12.0 million
  • Philippines 11.6 million
  • India 10.2 million
  • Argentina 9.2 million
  • UK 9.0 million
  • France 7.6 million

Most birds (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • Brazil 19.1 million
  • Italy 13.0 million
  • USA 8.3 million
  • Australia 7.8 million
  • France 6.2 million
  • Netherlands 4.5 million
  • Spain 3.7 million
  • Germany 3.5 million
  • Russia 2.8 million
  • Belgium 2.7 million

Most fish (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • USA 57.8 million
  • France 37.3 million
  • Brazil 26.5 million
  • Australia 20.5 million
  • UK 20.0 million
  • Germany 2.0 million
  • New Zealand 1.7 million
  • Italy 1.5 million
  • Russia 0.8 million
  • Netherlands 0.7 million

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Learn more about bank accounts

How do you open a bank account in Australia?

Opening a bank account in Australia is usually a straightforward process. Some banks give you the option of opening an account online, while others require you to visit a branch.

Different bank accounts offer different features, so it’s best to compare your options to find one that suits you.

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Common ID types include a driver’s licence, passport, Australian visa in a foreign passport, and Australian Medicare card. You’ll find out what types of ID are accepted when you go through the sign-up process online or at a branch.

Once your account is open, you’ll be given or sent a debit card that you can use to make purchases and withdraw money from your account.

Can I open a bank account in another country?

Despite having a bad rap for facilitating tax evasion, it is possible and legal to open a bank account in another country, also known as an ‘offshore account’.

Some people choose to open a bank account in another country to invest overseas, for higher interest-earning potential or to access foreign banking services.

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Typically, you will need to provide identification such as a passport, a local bank statement and a signed declaration proving the source of the money being used to open your account. Usually, deposits into offshore accounts can be made by international money transfer.

Can foreigners open bank account in Australia?

If you’re migrating, studying or working in Australia, you’ll be pleased to know that you can open an Australian bank account. For the most part, opening a bank account in Australia is a simple process which starts by comparing the types of bank accounts foreigners can open in Australia.

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When you apply for the account, you’ll need to provide proof of ID which may include your passport, overseas ID or credit card. You may also need to provide a copy of your visa and proof of address in Australia.

Depending on the bank and the type of account you choose, you may be able to apply for the account online or over the phone before you arrive in Australia.

Can foreigners open bank accounts in Australia?

Many Australian lenders allow foreigners to open bank accounts in Australia. Often, this can be done before you arrive in the country – with no Australian address required. When you get to Australia, you can pick up your debit card, using your passport as identification.

What do I need to open a company bank account?

To open a company bank account, you will probably have to provide 100 points of ID, an ABN and an ACN. You will probably have to provide the details of all signatories as well.

How do I overdraw my Commonwealth Bank account?

Overdrawing a bank account can happen by accident. It’s often hard to know what your balance is, particularly with direct debits, scheduled repayments and pending transactions competing for cash.

To avoid being stuck with a bank fee every time your account is overdrawn, you can apply for a personal overdraft. This will enable you to overdraw your account up to an approved amount.

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Can you open a bank account at 16?

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Can I start a bank account online?

Yes, most lenders that operate in Australia will let you set up a bank account online. The process is usually simple and takes five to 10 minutes. You will probably need to provide a passport or birth certificate, as well as a driver’s licence, Medicare card or another form of secondary identification. Requirements differ from lender to lender, so some institutions might ask for more or different forms of ID.

How to transfer money to another bank account

Transferring money to another bank is often called a bank transfer, and it can be done a few different ways.

Customers generally need three pieces of information to transfer money to another bank account. Customers need the account name, BSB and account number of the account they wish to transfer money to.

One way of transferring money to another bank account is in a branch with the help of a staff member; they will often give you a receipt as well as confirmation of the transfer.

Transfers can be also made via internet banking and phone banking.

Some banks also allow customers to make transfers via partnered ATMs, especially if the account is with the same bank.

How do you deposit change into your bank account?

One way to deposit change into your bank account is to visit a branch. Many lenders will also allow you to deposit your change through one of their ATMs.

How do you change your account name on NAB banking?

Changing the name on your NAB bank account is straightforward, as long as you have the right documents.

If you’ve just got married, divorced or legally changed your name, here’s what you need:

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You can take either the original document, or a certified copy, into a NAB branch, where it needs to be sighted by a bank employee and a copy taken.

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If you haven’t legally changed your name, but just want to change your account nicknames, you can log onto NAB and do it through the Settings/Mailbox menu.

How do you open a bank account under 18?

If you’re under 18 and you want to open an Australian bank account, you will need your passport or birth certificate. (Some lenders might require just a Medicare card or driver’s licence.) You can apply online or at a branch. If you’re 13 or under, you will probably need a parent to accompany you to a branch.

How do I transfer money from Paypal to my bank account?

Transferring cash from Paypal into your bank account is simple…if you have a Paypal account that is.

Once you’re logged into your Paypal account, the account balance will appear on your home page. Below your balance are two options:

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How can you cash a cheque without a bank account?

You can cash a cheque without a bank account if you visit the bank that issued the cheque. For example, if somebody sends you a cheque from Bank X (as written on the cheque) and you visit Bank X, it’s likely that Bank X will let you cash the cheque – provided the person who wrote the cheque has enough money in their account. Bank X would probably charge you a fee for the service.