Pet spending around the world

Pet spending around the world

America

Pet industry revenue – 2013-18 (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • 4.4% average annual growth

Pet industry revenue by category (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • Food 41.8%
  • Veterinary care 24.6%
  • Supplies/over-the-counter medicine 21.7%
  • Grooming and boarding 8.9%
  • Live animal purchases 3.0%

Pet ownership (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • 68% have pets
  • 48% have dogs
  • 38% have cats
  • 10% have freshwater fish
  • 6% have birds
  • 4% have reptiles
  • 2% have saltwater fish

Average annual spending per pet (source: American Pet Products Association)

  • Dogs US$1,678
  • Cats US$1,116
  • Fish US$750
  • Birds US$1,367
  • Rabbits US$780
  • Mice/rats US$960

Australia

Pet industry revenue – 2013-18 (source: IbisWorld)

  • 7.4% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • 62% have pets
  • 38% have dogs
  • 29% have cats
  • 12% have fish
  • 12% have birds
  • 3% have reptiles
  • 3% have small mammals

Buying cats (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Average cost A$274
  • 52% were free

Buying dogs (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Average cost A$548
  • 30% were free

Average annual spending per pet (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Dogs A$1,475
  • Cats A$1,029
  • Fish A$50
  • Birds A$115
  • Reptiles A$381
  • Small mammals A$224

Pet spending by category (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • Food 34.6%
  • Veterinary services 18.4%
  • Pet healthcare products 11.8%
  • Products or accessories 8.9%
  • Clipping/grooming 4.7%
  • Other 21.6%

Don’t have a pet? (source: Animal Medicines Australia)

  • 59% of petless households want a pet in the near future

Argentina

Dog food revenue – 2012-17 (source: Apertura.com)

  • 9% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 82% have pets
  • 66% have dogs
  • 32% have cats
  • 8% have fish
  • 7% have birds

Brazil

Pet care revenue – 2012-17 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 10% average annual growth

Pet food revenue – 2018-23 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 7.5% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 76% have pets
  • 58% have dogs
  • 28% have cats
  • 11% have birds
  • 7% have fish

Canada

Pet care revenue – 2014-20(source: Research and Markets)

  • 3.7% average annual growth forecast

Vet healthcare revenue – 2018-23(source: Mordor Intelligence)

  • 7.2% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership(source: GFK)

  • 61% have pets
  • 35% have cats
  • 33% have dogs
  • 9% have fish
  • 4% have birds

Cost of a pet in the first 12 months (source: RateSupermarket.ca)

  • Dog C$2,600
  • Cat C$1,921

Cost of annual pet insurance (source: RateSupermarket.ca)

  • Dog C$592
  • Cat C$357

China

Vet care and supplies revenue (source: Euromonitor)

  • 27% annual growth in 2017

Pet industry revenue – 2018-23 (source: Euromonitor)

  • 21.5% average annual growth forecast

Average annual spending per pet (source: Pet Fair Asia White Paper)

  • Dogs 5,508 yuan
  • Cats 4,311 yuan

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 47% have pets
  • 25% have dogs
  • 17% have fish
  • 10% have cats
  • 5% have birds

France

Pet food revenue – 2018-21 (source: Statista)

  • 3.7% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 65% have pets
  • 41% have cats
  • 29% have dogs
  • 12% have fish
  • 5% have birds

Germany

Pet care revenue – 2016 (source: ZZF)

  • 2.5% annual growth for pet accessories
  • 0.9% annual growth for prepared pet food

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 53% have pets
  • 29% have cats
  • 21% have dogs
  • 9% have fish
  • 6% have birds

India

Pet population – 2006-11 (source: Indian Pet and Equine Industry)

  • 7.4% average annual growth

Pet care revenue – 2012-17 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 23% average annual growth

Pet care revenue – FY18-22 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 20% average annual growth forecast

Pet food revenue – 2017-22 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 18% average annual growth forecast

Indonesia

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 2.7% average annual growth

Pet food revenue – 2018-21 (source: Statista)

  • 8.6% average annual growth forecast

Italy

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 3.1% average annual growth

Pet products revenue – 2015 (source: Export.gov)

  • 6.6% annual decline

Households with cats (source: Pets International)

  • 5.8% decline from 2013-17

Households with dogs (source: Pets International)

  • 10.5% growth from 2013-17

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 67% have pets
  • 39% have dogs
  • 34% have cats
  • 11% have fish
  • 8% have birds

Japan

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 5.1% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 37% have pets
  • 17% have dogs
  • 14% have cats
  • 9% have fish
  • 2% have birds

Asia-Pacific pet healthcare market share (source: Research and Markets)

  • 50.4% Japan
  • 49.6% other

Mexico

Pet numbers – 2014-17 (source: GFK)

  • 4% growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 81% have pets
  • 64% have dogs
  • 24% have cats
  • 10% have fish
  • 10% have birds

Average annual spending per pet (source: Statista)

  • 16884 pesos

Pet spending by category (source: Statista)

  • Food 35.9%
  • Veterinary services 23.6%
  • Hygiene 11.9%
  • Travel 6.8%
  • Treats 6.4%
  • Toys 6.3%
  • Daycare/boarding 4.9%
  • Accessories 4.3%

New Zealand

Pet industry revenue – 2011-16 (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • 2.4% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • 64% have pets
  • 44% have cats
  • 28% have dogs
  • 10% have fish
  • 7% have birds
  • 3% have rabbits

Don’t have a pet? (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • 58% of people who don’t have a pet would like one

Desexing (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats 93%
  • Dogs 75%

Microchipping (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats 31%
  • Dogs 71%

Insurance (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats 10%
  • Dogs 19%

Average annual spending per pet (source: Companion Animal Council)

  • Cats NZ$670
  • Dogs NZ$1,200

Russia

Pet healthcare revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 9.3% average annual growth

Pet food revenue – 2016-22 (source: Mordor Intelligence)

  • 1.7% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 74% have pets
  • 29% have dogs
  • 57% have cats
  • 11% have fish
  • 9% have birds

Saudi Arabia

By the numbers

  • 2008 - the year religious police banned the sale of cats and dogs (source: Arabian Business)
  • 2 dogs per 1,000 people - one of the lowest rates in the world (source: Euromonitor)
  • 6.2% - forecast average annual growth of cat food market in 2018-23 (source: Research and Markets)

South Africa

Pet industry revenue – 2012-17 (source: Pets International)

  • 1.9% average annual growth

Pet population (source: Euromonitor)

  • Cats 2.4 million
  • Dogs 9.1 million

South Korea

Pet industry revenue – 2012-15 (source: Koisra)

  • 29.1% average annual growth

Pet industry revenue – 2015-20 (source: Koisra)

  • 24.6% average annual growth forecast

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 32% have pets
  • 20% have dogs
  • 7% have fish
  • 6% have cats
  • 1% have birds

Turkey

Pet industry revenue – 2012-16 (source: Research and Markets)

  • 5.8% average annual growth

Pet ownership (source: GFK)

  • 50% have pets
  • 20% have birds
  • 16% have fish
  • 15% have cats
  • 12% have dogs

UK

Pet ownership (source: Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association)

  • 45% have pets
  • 26% have dogs
  • 18% have cats
  • 2% have rabbits
  • 1% have indoor birds
  • 1% have guinea pigs
  • 1% have hamsters

Pet obesity rate (source: Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association)

  • 52% dogs
  • 47% cats
  • 32% small mammals
  • 12% birds

Pet food revenue – 2018-23 (source: Mintel)

  • 2.6% average annual growth forecast

Pet care revenue – 2018-23 (source: Mintel)

  • 4.5% average annual growth forecast

Average annual spending per pet (source: More Than)

  • Dogs £2,880
  • Cats £1,200

It’s me or the dog (source: Mintel)

  • 51% of pet owners would rather reduce spending on themselves than their pets

World

Survey of 27,000 people in 22 countries found... (source: GFK)

  • 57% have pets
  • 33% have dogs
  • 23% have cats
  • 12% have fish
  • 6% have birds

Most pets (source: GFK)

  • Argentina 82%
  • Mexico 81%
  • Brazil 76%

Fewest pets (source: GFK)

  • South Korea 32%
  • Hong Kong 36%
  • Japan 37%

Most popular country for... (source: GFK)

  • Dogs - Argentina 66%
  • Cats - Russia 57%
  • Fish - China 17%
  • Birds - Turkey 20%

Pet industry revenue – fastest average annual growth rates, 2012-17 (source: Pets International)

  • India 16.3%
  • China 14.7%
  • Thailand 12.2%
  • Vietnam 12.2%
  • Chile 9.9%
  • South Korea 8.2%
  • Bulgaria 7.7%
  • Egypt 7.5%
  • Philippines 7.4%
  • Saudi Arabia 7.4%

Pet industry revenue – average annual growth rates, 2012-17 (source: Pets International)

  • Asia Pacific 6.9%
  • Eastern Europe 5.4%
  • Middle East & Africa 5.4%
  • Latin America 3.4%
  • North America 1.8%
  • Western Europe 0.8%
  • Australasia 0.6%

Pet industry revenue – market share per region (source: Pets International)

  • North America 44.4%
  • Western Europe 26.0%
  • Asia Pacific 10.5%
  • Latin America 9.9%
  • Eastern Europe 5.2%
  • Australasia 3.0%
  • Middle East & Africa 0.8%

Cats v dogs (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • South Africa 370 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Argentina 307 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Czech Republic 180 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Australia 168 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Japan 164 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Spain 139 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Poland 132 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Hungary 128 dogs for every 100 cats
  • UK 113 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Romania 107 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Italy 95 dogs for every 100 cats
  • America 94 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Russia 70 dogs for every 100 cats
  • France 66 dogs for every 100 cats
  • Germany 65 dogs for every 100 cats
  • China 52 dogs for every 100 cats

Most cats (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • USA 74.1 million
  • China 53.1 million
  • Russia 17.8 million
  • Brazil 12.5 million
  • France 11.5 million
  • Germany 8.2 million
  • UK 8.0 million
  • Italy 7.4 million
  • Ukraine 7.4 million
  • Japan 7.3 million

Most dogs (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • USA 69.9 million
  • Brazil 35.8 million
  • China 27.4 million
  • Russia 12.5 million
  • Japan 12.0 million
  • Philippines 11.6 million
  • India 10.2 million
  • Argentina 9.2 million
  • UK 9.0 million
  • France 7.6 million

Most birds (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • Brazil 19.1 million
  • Italy 13.0 million
  • USA 8.3 million
  • Australia 7.8 million
  • France 6.2 million
  • Netherlands 4.5 million
  • Spain 3.7 million
  • Germany 3.5 million
  • Russia 2.8 million
  • Belgium 2.7 million

Most fish (source: MapsOfWorld.com)

  • USA 57.8 million
  • France 37.3 million
  • Brazil 26.5 million
  • Australia 20.5 million
  • UK 20.0 million
  • Germany 2.0 million
  • New Zealand 1.7 million
  • Italy 1.5 million
  • Russia 0.8 million
  • Netherlands 0.7 million

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