Should financial literacy be taught in schools?

Should financial literacy be taught in schools?

RateCity 2018 Business & Finance Scholarship winning essay

The RateCity 2018 Business & Finance Scholarship was a chance to win $3,000 towards learning expenses.   

Larissa Zhang, UNSW Actuarial Studies/Commerce student, submitted the winning essay, answering the question “should financial literacy be taught in schools? Why or why not?” Congratulations Larissa!

When discussing financial literacy, it is essential to first answer the age old question: can millennials really afford to buy a house if they stop eating smashed avocados on toast? While that certainly is an exaggeration, the stereotype that young adults do not make sound financial decisions to maintain their financial wellbeing is definitely an issue that needs to be tackled.

In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the economic and social obstacles youth face in making successful transitions to adulthood. Amidst housing affordability pressures and vulnerability to exploitation, financial education is a key enabler of a young person’s move to economic independence.

Greater financial literacy and awareness is a stepping stone for youth today to take on the booming housing market in Australian cities – a phenomenon where the great Australian dream of home ownership has become largely elusive. A growing divide is created from older generations capturing an increasing share of the nation’s wealth. Home ownership rates among households headed by 25-34-year-olds fell from 60% in 1981 to 45% in 2016. This trend has real consequences for family finances and the capability of youth to uncover their place in the world.

According to property developer Tim Gurner in 2017, “we are coming into a new reality where … a lot of people won’t own a house in their lifetime. That is just the reality.” Introducing financial literacy into the school curriculum can instil that eye-opening reality into student’s expectations of their future. By understanding early-on the challenges they must tackle in order to achieve financial independence, greater industry awareness can prepare them for effective decision-making of financial products in a world of overpowering pressures.

Consumer protection starts with youth taking responsibility of their finances in the face of a dynamic and competitive market. Services such as Afterpay and credit cards that provide immediate funds are tempting in the perspective of a low-income youths, despite the promise of instant purchase and deferring the financial burden into the future promoting irresponsible spending and trivialising the significance of being in debt. As revealed in the Royal Banking Commission, the big banks are not fulfilling their due diligence to ensure borrowers’ repaying capacity – furthermore failing to comply with the best interests of customers in 75% of the advice files that ASIC reviewed. Being accountable for their own finances, youths can avoid being exploited by the major corporations and plan for their future wellbeing.

The government should act to incorporate financial literacy within the curriculum to better educate and protect the next generation before unsustainable debt overcomes the economy. Engaging young people in the financial world instills in them healthy financial behaviours. Through teaching financial literacy in schools, students can benefit by making informed decisions in a dynamic landscape of competitive consumer products to establish greater financial security. Ultimately, better education can provide youth with a clearer orientation towards their future goals and the role they can play in the world.

By Larissa Zhang

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Which bank is best for business accounts?

Unfortunately, there’s no definitive answer to the question of which bank is best for business accounts. That’s because ‘best’ will differ from customer to customer, depending on their unique circumstances. These include not only your company’s financial position, but also its size, its age and the sector in which it operates. Another factor to consider is what features you want in a bank account. Your business may require different features than another business; and your business may require different features tomorrow than it does today.

The best thing to do is to thoroughly research the market before opening a business account. And when you do open an account, you should reassess your options every year or two, because the market moves quickly. A particular bank might offer the best account today, but be surpassed by one or several rivals tomorrow.

Can I have a PayPal account without a bank account?

You don’t need a bank account to send or receive money through PayPal. However, you do need a bank account if you want to withdraw money from your PayPal account.

How do I open a new bank account?

There are a number of ways to open a new bank account – online, over the phone or in the branch. The trick is to decide what type of bank account you want beforehand.

It might sound like a simple enough task, but there are literally hundreds of bank accounts to choose from. And each offer their own banking features and benefits.

A comparison site like RateCity can help you work out what bank account product matches your needs.

Once you’ve made up your mind what you want, it’s advisable to have the following information ready for the application process.

  • A couple of forms of identification (such as driver’s licence, Medicare card, passport)
  • Tax file number
  • Residential address, contact phone number and email (though email is not essential)

Can I find my bank account number online?

Yes, you can find your bank account number by logging into your online banking and clicking on the relevant account.

What do you need to open bank accounts?

Opening a bank account is one of the simplest online tasks you could perform. The hard part is deciding which type of bank account you want to open.

All banking institutions have a website where you hit ‘apply’ on the account of your choice and step through an application in less than 10 minutes.

Here’s a list of information that is generally required for applications.

  • Identification (driver’s licence, passport, proof of age card, proof of citizenship and/or birth certificate)
  • Tax file number (so you don’t get charged the highest tax rate)
  • Address, contact email and phone number

If you decide to open a new account at the branch, make sure you ask beforehand what information you need to take with you, or take all of the above to be safe.

Can I open bank accounts for my children?

A common question for new parents is, ‘Can I open a bank account for my child?’

The short answer is yes – as a parent you can open a bank account for your child.

Once you’ve compared your options and found a bank account that suits your needs, the process is relatively simple.

As the bank account is for your child, you’ll need to provide some documentation such as proof of ID, including your tax file number.

You will also need a copy of your child’s birth certificate, and in some cases you may also need to sign a guarantee of indemnity.

Depending on the bank and whether you’re an existing customer, you may be able to open a bank account for your child online. However, you may still need to go into a branch to prove your identity.

How do I close my bank account online?

You can usually easily open a bank account online, but you often can’t close it online.

Many banks and credit unions will only let you close an account if you go into a branch or call them on the phone.

However, some banks will let you request to close the account via your internet banking. Check your financial provider’s website for details.

Just remember: If you still have funds in the bank account, transfer them to another account, or withdraw the cash. Also, if you have any payments like direct debits going in or out of the bank account, these will also stop when you close your account.

Can I close a bank account with pending transactions?

You can close a bank account with pending transactions. But after the account is closed, any incoming transactions will be declined by your (old) bank.

The best way to ensure this doesn’t occur is to either wait to close your account until all pending transactions are complete, or contact the creditor and supply them with alternate bank details.

If you’re unsure whether you have any scheduled transactions, you can speak to a banking representative over the phone or via online support.

In most cases, your bank withholds the amount owing for pending transactions (such as online purchases).

Because the pending amount is deducted from your bank balance, you can close your bank account and the purchase will be honoured.

How do I open a bank account for a child?

There are few better ways for a child to learn about money management than through savings. And there’s a plethora of bank accounts designed specifically for young people and children.

A bank account for a child can be opened online, over the phone or in a branch in a few easy steps. The minimum age a child can open a bank account for themselves usually ranges between 12 and 14.

If the child is too young to open the account, you can do it for them as their legal parent or guardian. 

To do this, you would need to be over 18, have an Australian residential address and currently reside in Australia (or have proof of residency).

You would also need to provide:

  • Identification for yourself and the child
  • Your tax file number (TFN) or TFN exemption

Depending on the bank account, you might be able to choose what level of access the child has to their bank account (online and via the phone).

Can British expats still open bank accounts?

As a British expat, you can open an Australian bank account, and you can apply for an account the same ways an Aussie would. You can even open an account online from the UK prior to relocating.

If you’re overseas, the bank you choose to open an account with may call you to provide you with our new account details beforehand. You can then have your ID verified within a branch once you’ve arrived.

And if you’re already living down under, the following list outlines the types of information required by most banks when opening an Australian bank account.

  • Australian residential address
  • Tax file number (TFN) or a TFN exemption
  • Identification (this can be your passport)

How can I close an ANZ Bank account from overseas?

There are two ways you can close your ANZ Bank account from overseas:

  • Call +64 4 472 7123 (toll charges apply)
  • Send a bank mail request via ANZ internet banking

Can Centrelink access your bank account?

Yes, Centrelink can access your bank account, but only if you give them a reason to. Centrelink uses data-matching software with other federal government agencies to help it crack down on welfare cheats.

This is why it’s important to give true and matching information to all government agencies.

For example, if you report to Centrelink your annual income is $25,000, but at tax time you report your income as $50,000 with the ATO, it’s likely you’ll be ‘red flagged’.

At this point, Centrelink can legally request that your bank hand over your personal bank account details, to review your finances.

In most cases, Centrelink does not have the authority to take money out of your account. You will usually be given written notice to repay the debt.

However, Centrelink can also reduce your benefits until you’ve paid back what you owe. In extreme cases, Centrelink can garnish your wages and assets (including money in your bank account) until your debt is repaid.

Can you open another account at the same bank?

Yes, you can open another account at the same bank if you already have an account there, but some banks place a limit on how many specific accounts you can open.

Generally, though, it is possible to have more than one everyday account, one personal account and one joint account, or have different types of accounts – such as a transaction account and a savings account.

Keep in mind that some bank accounts come with fees, so you could be charged twice for having two types of the same account at the same bank.

Also, if you have more than one high-interest transaction account at the same bank, only one account will be able to earn the highest rate of interest.

Can you open a bank account at 16?

Yes, you can open a bank account at 16, or even younger. If you’re 13 or under, you will probably need a parent to accompany you to a branch.