The real cost of a repayment pause, and how to minimise the fallout

The real cost of a repayment pause, and how to minimise the fallout

CBA’s announcement today that customers who take a six-month repayment pause will be refunded interest-on-interest charges during this time will help families struggling to make ends meet.

This measure, and the major banks’ offer of a repayment pause for people in severe financial hardship will help thousands of Australians at a time when they need it most.

But clearing the debt on the other side of a repayment pause will be an uphill battle for many families and comes at a cost.

RateCity.com.au research shows that a mortgage holder could end up paying over $17,000 extra over the remainder of their loan as the result of a six-month pause if they don’t make extra repayments on the other side. This assumes the person is five years into a 30-year loan with a balance of $400,000.

RateCity.com.au research director Sally Tindall said the banks were to be congratulated for helping people who can’t meet their mortgage repayments, but that it was important for customers to understand the long-term implications of a repayment pause and think about how they can minimise the fallout.

“A lot of people will have to resort to putting their mortgage on hold during this crisis. That’s the cold hard reality for many families,” she said.

“If that’s you, try to come up with a plan to pay the money back as quickly as possible after the pause to get your mortgage back on track.

“Repayment pauses should only be used when other avenues have been exhausted. Talk to your bank about what other options you might have, including a rate reduction or reduced repayments for a limited time.

"When it comes to paying off your mortgage, every dollar makes a difference,” she said.

What each bank does for a mortgage repayment pause:

  • CBA – home loan repayments remain the same as before the pause, but the loan term is extended. CBA will also make a one-time payment intended to offset the interest-on-interest charged to customers receiving a home loan deferral for six months.
  • Westpac – home loan repayments increase after the pause, but the loan term remains the same. Westpac is currently offering a 3-month pause with the option for a further 3 months after review.
  • NAB – home loan repayments increase after the pause, but the loan term remains the same.
  • ANZ – gives customers the option of keeping the loan term the same or extending it by six months (with a review at three months). Either option is likely to see mortgage repayments increase after the pause.

Note: customers may be able to talk to their bank about a different repayment structure.

The cost of a six month pause on a $400,000 loan balance with 25 years remaining:

  LOAN TERM REMAINS SAME LOAN TERM EXTENDED
Extra paid over life of loan $6051.69 $17,377.61
Increase in monthly repayment after pause $61.63 $0
Increase in loan term 0 15 months

Notes: Based on an owner occupier paying principal and interest on the average rate of 3.54%. Excludes interest-on-interest charges during the pause, however some banks will charge this. People who are further into their loan will pay less.

Tips for reducing the impact of a repayment pause

  • Try and pay off some of your loan during the pause.
  • When the pause finishes, see if you can make extra repayments to catch up.
  • Negotiate a lower interest rate with your bank and if possible, try and put any savings from the rate reduction back into your mortgage.
  • Call an independent financial advisor or a financial counsellor for advice. The National Debt Hotline is: 1800 007 007.

Potential alternatives to pausing mortgage repayments:

  • Switch to minimum repayments: customers making higher repayments on their loan can ask their bank to adjust their repayments to the minimum to free up cash.
  • Use your redraw facility: if you are ahead on your repayments you can access them via redraw (fees may be charged).
  • Request a rate cut: variable rate customers can ask their bank to lower their home loan rate. While banks typically don’t allow rate changes for fixed rate customers if you are in financial stress, it’s still worth asking.
  • Switch to interest-only repayments: many lenders will let you only pay the interest on your loan for a period of time. While it will reduce your monthly repayments in the short term, your interest rate is likely to increase and by not paying down your debt, you will pay more in interest charges the longer term.
  • Reduce repayments temporarily: instead of going on a full repayment pause, see if you can reduce your repayments. While this can potentially add thousands to your mortgage, it’s likely to be better than going on a full repayment holiday.

 

Did you find this helpful? Why not share this news?

Advertisement

RateCity

Money Health Newsletter

Subscribe for news, tips and expert opinions to help you make smarter financial decisions

By signing up, you agree to the ratecity.com.au Privacy & Cookies Policy and Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy

Advertisement

Learn more about home loans

What is a fixed home loan?

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

How does a redraw facility work?

A redraw facility attached to your loan allows you to borrow back any additional repayments that you have already paid on your loan. This can be a beneficial feature because, by paying down the principal with additional repayments, you will be charged less interest. However you will still be able to access the extra money when needed.

How much are repayments on a $250K mortgage?

The exact repayment amount for a $250,000 mortgage will be determined by several factors including your deposit size, interest rate and the type of loan. It is best to use a mortgage calculator to determine your actual repayment size.

For example, the monthly repayments on a $250,000 loan with a 5 per cent interest rate over 30 years will be $1342. For a loan of $300,000 on the same rate and loan term, the monthly repayments will be $1610 and for a $500,000 loan, the monthly repayments will be $2684.

Remaining loan term

The length of time it will take to pay off your current home loan, based on the currently-entered mortgage balance, monthly repayment and interest rate.

Mortgage Calculator, Property Value

An estimate of how much your desired property is worth. 

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Purpose

This is what you will use the loan for – i.e. investment. 

Mortgage Calculator, Repayment Type

Will you pay off the amount you borrowed + interest or just the interest for a period?

Why should you trust Real Time Ratings?

Real Time Ratings™ was conceived by a team of data experts who have been analysing trends and behaviour in the home loan market for more than a decade. It was designed purely to meet the evolving needs of home loan customers who wish to merge low cost with flexible features quickly. We believe it fills a glaring gap in the market by frequently re-rating loan products based on the changes lenders make daily.

Real Time Ratings™ is a new idea and will change over time to match the frequently-evolving demands of the market. Some things won’t change though – it will always rate all relevent products in our database and will not be influenced by advertising.

If you have any feedback about Real Time Ratings™, please get in touch.

What happens to your mortgage when you die?

There is no hard and fast answer to what will happen to your mortgage when you die as it is largely dependent on what you have set out in your mortgage agreement, your will (if you have one), other assets you may have and if you have insurance. If you have co-signed the mortgage with another person that person will become responsible for the remaining debt when you die.

If the mortgage is in your name only the house will be sold by the bank to cover the remaining debt and your nominated air will receive the remaining sum if there is a difference. If there is a turn in the market and the sale of your house won’t cover the remaining debt the case may go to court and the difference may have to be covered by the sale of other assets.  

If you have a life insurance policy your family may be able to use some of the lump sum payment from this to pay down the remaining mortgage debt. Alternatively, your lender may provide some form of mortgage protection that could assist your family in making repayments following your passing.

Mortgage Calculator, Deposit

The proportion you have already saved to go towards your home. 

How will Real Time Ratings help me find a new home loan?

The home loan market is complex. With almost 4,000 different loans on offer, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to work out which loans work for you.

That’s where Real Time RatingsTM can help. Our system automatically filters out loans that don’t fit your requirements and ranks the remaining loans based on your individual loan requirements and preferences.

Best of all, the ratings are calculated in real time so you know you’re getting the most current information.

What is a building in course of erection loan?

Also known as a construction home loan, a building in course of erection (BICOE) loan loan allows you to draw down funds as a building project advances in order to pay the builders. This option is available on selected variable rate loans.

What factors does Real Time Ratings consider?

Real Time RatingsTM uses a range of information to provide personalised results:

  • Your loan amount
  • Your borrowing status (whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor)
  • Your loan-to-value ratio (LVR)
  • Your personal preferences (such as whether you want an offset account or to be able to make extra repayments)
  • Product information (such as a loan’s interest rate, fees and LVR requirements)
  • Market changes (such as when new loans come on to the market)

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Amount

How much you intend to borrow.