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Product

AMP SignatureSuper

Past 5-year return
New

% p.a

FYTD return

-0.06

% p.a

Company
Calc fees on 50k

$738

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
SuperRatings Platinum 2022 MyChoice Super
Go to site
Product

LGIAsuper - Accumulation Account (Retained Benefits)

Past 5-year return
7.57

% p.a

FYTD return

0.73

% p.a

Company
Calc fees on 50k

$530

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
SuperRatings Platinum 2022 MyChoice Super
Go to site

Diversified Growth

Product

MLC MasterKey Business Super

Past 5-year return
7.78

% p.a

FYTD return

1.26

% p.a

Company
Calc fees on 50k

$928

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
SuperRatings Platinum 2022 MyChoice Super
Go to site

Horizon 4 - Balanced Portfolio

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Superannuation funds we compare at RateCity

Does superannuation come with health insurance?

Yes, it’s possible to get superannuation with a side of health insurance but you’ll need to find a super fund that includes it in its offering. 

A lot of super funds in Australia offer health insurance as a fringe benefit to members, among other discounted products and services. As a prospective member, this means you have the opportunity to get extra benefits from your super fund.

What other types of insurance can you get through your super fund?

Superannuation funds generally offer three insurance options to eligible members:

  • Death cover (life insurance); this type of cover pays a lump sum or income stream to your nominated beneficiaries after your passing. If you don’t nominate anyone, a trustee or your estate will decide where the money goes.
  • Total and permanent disability (TPD) cover; this provides you with a lump sum payment if you can’t work again due to becoming totally and permanently disabled. The definition of ‘total and permanent disability’ differs slightly between funds, so it pays to check how a policy defines disability, as this will affect your TPD cover.
  • Income protection (IP) cover; income protection cover provides you with a regular income for a certain period of time if you’re unable to work due to temporary illness or injury, giving you peace of mind over your financial situation.
    Additional insurance policies are offered at the fund’s discretion.

What’s the benefit of buying health insurance through a super fund?

The convenience of having all your insurance policies under the one roof is the major benefit of taking out health insurance through your super. Not only can you more easily keep tabs on your cover but the recurring payments for premiums will come out of the one place—your super account balance, keeping repayments simple and out of pocket expenses low.

If you want to consolidate all your insurances in your super, you’ll have to find an Australian super fund with health cover. It’s important to shop around and compare your existing fund with competitors before you sign on the dotted line, to ensure you’re getting a fund that suits your personal circumstances.

Another benefit of taking out super insurance with health cover is the potential to receive a discount. Most Australian super funds offer discounted health insurance to their members, which can help you keep more money in your retirement nest egg.

If you decide to take out superannuation health insurance, the transfer from your current health insurer could potentially be done for you and the waiting periods could be waived, making the conversion process easier.

Should you get health insurance through your super fund or another provider?

The decision on whether to get health insurance through your super fund or a standalone provider rests on where the best value lies for you. So, take the time to compare policies to ensure you find one that has the inclusions and level of cover you’re after.

It’s also important to take into consideration that some super funds require a medical examination for health insurance policies. This is particularly important if you or a family member has any pre-existing health conditions, as this may affect your cover.

How do you find a super fund that offers health insurance?

There are a limited number of Australian super insurers that offer health insurance, so it can be a challenge to find one. 

GMHBA, an Australian not-for-profit health fund, is one of the main insurers partnering with superannuation funds to offer health insurance policies.

When searching around for superannuation insurance, it’s important to know the difference between life and health insurance, as they’re very different policies; health insurance protects against the risk of hospitalisation and medical expenses while life insurance protects against the risk of death.

Be sure to read the product disclosure statement of any superannuation fund you’re considering, to ensure you understand exactly what it covers.

 How can you check what types of insurance you hold through your super fund?

Considering that super fund insurance premiums are taken out of your retirement savings, it’s important to know where that money is going.

To find out what types of insurance you have in your super, you can:

  • Check the information on your annual statement
  • Read the relevant product disclosure statement (pds)
  • Visit the super fund’s website or online portal
  • Reach out to your fund directly for confirmation.


From this, you’ll also be able to see how much cover you have and how much you’re paying in premiums.

What are the pros and cons of holding insurance through super?

There are both advantages and disadvantages when it comes to taking out super insurance cover.

Pros of super insurance:

  • Easy to pay: insurance premiums are automatically deducted from your super balance, meaning your repayments are on autopilot and you’re not out of pocket in terms of cash flow.
  • Tax-effective payments: your employer’s super or salary sacrifice contributions are taxed by 15 per cent, which is lower than the marginal tax rate for most people. This can make paying for health insurance through super more tax-effective than a standalone health insurance provider.
  • Convenient: housing all your insurance policies in the one place can make things easier and potentially relieve pressure, as the premiums are not being taken out of your bank account that funds other financial commitments.
  • Could be less than standalone insurance: oftentimes if you take out health insurance with your super fund you can access discounts, so you may be able to secure a better deal.

Cons of super insurance:

  • Reduces your retirement savings: insurance premiums are deducted from your super balance, which means there’ll be less funds to pull from when you retire.
  • Limited cover: the amount of cover you get through super insurance may be lower than a standalone insurance policy, with certain exclusions, meaning it may not be sufficient for your insurance needs.
  • Cover could end: if you swap super funds, your contributions stop or your super account becomes inactive, your cover could possibly end, leaving you with no level of insurance.

Frequently asked questions

What is the age pension's assets test?

The value of your assets affects whether you can qualify for the age pension – and, if so, how much.

The following assets are exempt from the assets test:

  • your principal home and up to two hectares of used land on the same title
  • all Australian superannuation investments from which a pension is not being paid – this exemption is valid until you reach age pension age
  • any property or money left to you in an estate, which you can’t get for up to 12 months
  • a cemetery plot and a prepaid funeral, or up to two funeral bonds, that cost no more than the allowable limit
  • aids for people with disability
  • money from the National Disability Insurance Scheme for people with disability
  • principal home sale proceeds you’ll use to buy another home within 12 months
  • accommodation bonds paid on entry to residential aged care
  • any interest not created by you or your partner
  • a Special Disability Trust if it meets certain requirements
  • your principal home, if you vacate it for up to 12 months
  • granny flat rights where you pay more than the extra allowable amount

For full pensions, reductions apply when your assessable assets exceed these thresholds:

Category

Home owners

Non-home owners

Singles

$253,750

$456,750

Couples living together

$380,500

$583,500

Couples living apart due to ill health

$380,500

$583,500

Couples with only one partner eligible

$380,500

$583,500

For part pensions, reductions apply when your assessable assets exceed these thresholds:

Category

Home owners

Non-home owners

Singles

$550,000

$753,000

Couples living together

$827,000

$1,030,000

Couples living apart due to ill health

$973,000

$1,176,000

Couples with only one partner eligible

$827,000

$1,030,000

For transitional rate pensions, reductions apply when your assessable assets exceed these thresholds:

Category

Home owners

Non-home owners

Singles

$503,250

$706,250

Couples living together

$783,000

$986,000

Couples living apart due to ill health

$879,500

$1,082,500

Couples with only one partner eligible

$783,000

$986,000

How does the age pension work?

Most Australians who are of retirement age can qualify for the age pension. However, depending on the size of your assets and post-retirement income, you might be entitled to only a reduced pension. In some instances, you might not be entitled to any pension payments.

What are the age pension's age rules?

Australians must be aged at least 65 years and 6 months to access the age pension. This eligibility age is scheduled to increase according to the following schedule:

Date Eligibility age
1 July 2019 66 years
1 July 2021 66 years and 6 months
1 July 2023 67 years

What are the age pension's residence rules?

On the day you claim the age pension, you must be in Australia and you must have been an Australian resident for at least 10 years (with no break in your stay for at least five of those years). The following exceptions apply:

  • You’re exempt from the 10-year rule if you’re a refugee or former refugee
  • You’re exempt from the 10-year rule if you’re getting Partner Allowance, Widow Allowance or Widow B pension
  • You can claim the age pension with only two years of residency if you’re a woman whose partner died while you were both Australian residents
  • You might be able to claim the age pension if you’ve lived or worked in a country that has a social security agreement with Australia

How much money do you get on the age pension?

Pension payments can be reduced due to the income test and asset test (see ‘What is the age pension’s income test?’ and ‘What is the age pension’s assets test?’).

Here are the maximum fortnightly payments:

Category

Single

Couple each

Couple combined

Couple apart due to ill health

Maximum basic rate

$808.30

$609.30

$1,218.60

$808.30

Maximum pension supplement

$65.90

$49.70

$99.40

$65.90

Energy supplement

$14.10

$10.60

$21.20

$14.10

TOTAL

$888.30

$669.60

$1,339.20

$888.30

What is the age pension's income test?

These are the rules for most people who want to claim the standard pension:

Single people

  • If your income per fortnight is up to $168, you’re entitled to a full pension
  • If your income per fortnight is over $168, your pension will reduce by 50 cents for each dollar over $168

Couples

  • If your income per fortnight is up to $300, you’re entitled to a full pension
  • If your income per fortnight is over $300, your pension will reduce by 50 cents for each dollar over $300

These are the rules for most people who want to claim the transitional pension:

Single people

  • If your income per fortnight is up to $168, you’re entitled to a full pension
  • If your income per fortnight is over $168, your pension will reduce by 40 cents for each dollar over $168

Couples

  • If your income per fortnight is up to $300, you’re entitled to a full pension
  • If your income per fortnight is over $300, your pension will reduce by 40 cents for each dollar over $300

For most people, the age pension cuts off if your fortnightly income exceeds these thresholds:

Category Fortnightly income
Standard pension for singles $1,944.60
Standard pension for couples living together $2,978.40
Standard pension for couples living apart due to ill health $3,853.20
Transitional pension for singles $2,038.00
Transitional pension for couples living together $3,317.00
Transitional pension for couples living apart due to ill health $4,040.00

What happens to my insurance cover if I change superannuation funds?

Some superannuation funds will allow you to transfer your insurance cover, without interruption, if you switch. However, others won’t. So it’s important you check before changing funds.

When can I access my superannuation?

You can withdraw your superannuation when you meet the ‘conditions of release’. The conditions of release say you can claim your super when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

The preservation age – which is different to the pension age – is based on date of birth. Here are the six different categories:

Date of birth Preservation age
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964 59
From 1 July 1964 60

A transition to retirement allows you to continue working while accessing up to 10 per cent of the money in your superannuation account at the start of each financial year.

There are also seven special circumstances under which you can claim your superannuation:

  • Compassionate grounds
  • Severe financial hardship
  • Temporary incapacity
  • Permanent incapacity
  • Superannuation inheritance
  • Superannuation balance under $200
  • Temporary resident departing Australia

 

How do you open a superannuation account?

Opening a superannuation account is simple. When you start a job, your employer will give you what’s called a ‘superannuation standard choice form’. Here’s what you need to complete the form:

  • The name of your preferred superannuation fund
  • The fund’s address
  • The fund’s Australian business number (ABN)
  • The fund’s superannuation product identification number (SPIN)
  • The fund’s phone number
  • A letter from the fund trustee confirming that the fund is a complying fund; or written evidence from the fund stating it will accept contributions from your new employer; or details about how your employer can make contributions to the fund

You might want to provide your tax file number as well – while it’s not a legal obligation, it will ensure your contributions will be taxed at the (lower) superannuation rate.

What is the superannuation rate?

The superannuation rate, or guarantee rate, is the percentage of your salary that your employer must pay into your superannuation fund. The superannuation guarantee has been set at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How does superannuation affect the age pension?

Most Australians who are of retirement age can qualify for the age pension. However, depending on the size of your assets and post-retirement income, you might be entitled to only a reduced pension. In some instances, you might not be entitled to any pension payments.

Am I entitled to superannuation if I'm a contractor?

As a contractor, you’re entitled to superannuation if:

  • The contract is mainly for your labour
  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

Please note that you’re entitled to superannuation even if you have an Australian business number (ABN).

What is a superannuation fund?

A superannuation fund is an institution that is legally allowed to hold and invest your superannuation. There are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia. They come in five different types:

  • Retail funds
  • Industry funds
  • Public sector funds
  • Corporate funds
  • Self-managed super funds

Retail funds are usually run by banks or investment companies.

Industry funds were originally designed for workers from a particular industry, but are now open to anyone.

Public sector funds were originally designed for people working for federal or state government departments. Most are still reserved for government employees.

Corporate funds are arranged by employers for their employees.

Self-managed super funds are private superannuation funds that allow people to directly invest their money.

How can I withdraw my superannuation?

There are three different ways you can withdraw your superannuation:

  • Lump sum
  • Account-based pension
  • Part lump sum and part account-based pension

Two rules apply if you choose to receive an account-based pension (also known as an income stream):

  • You must receive payments at least once per year
  • You must withdraw a minimum amount per year
    • Age 55-64 = 4%
    • Age 65-74 = 5%
    • Age 75-79 = 6%
    • Age 80-84 = 7%
    • Age 85-89 = 9%
    • Age 90-94 = 11%
    • Age 95+ = 14%

If you want to work out how long your account-based pension might last, click here to access ASIC’s account-based pension calculator.

How much is superannuation in Australia?

Superannuation in Australia is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How much is superannuation?

Superannuation is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

What happens if my employer falls behind on my superannuation payments?

The Australian Taxation Office will investigate if your employer falls behind on your superannuation payments or doesn’t pay at all. You can report your employer with this online tool.

How do you access superannuation?

Accessing your superannuation is a simple administrative procedure – you just ask your fund to pay it. You can access your superannuation in three different ways:

  • Lump sum
  • Account-based pension
  • Part lump sum and part account-based pension

However, please note that your superannuation fund will only be able to make a payout if you meet the ‘conditions of release’. The conditions of release say you can claim your super when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

The preservation age has six different categories:

Date of birth Preservation age
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964 59
From 1 July 1964 60

There are also seven special circumstances under which you can claim your superannuation:

  • Compassionate grounds
  • Severe financial hardship
  • Temporary incapacity
  • Permanent incapacity
  • Superannuation inheritance
  • Superannuation balance under $200
  • Temporary resident departing Australia

How many superannuation funds are there?

There are more than 200 different superannuation funds.

What happens to my superannuation when I change jobs?

You can keep your superannuation fund for as long as you like, so nothing happens when you change jobs. Please note that some superannuation funds have special features for people who work with certain employers, so these features may no longer be available if you change jobs.