What are unique superannuation identifiers?

What are unique superannuation identifiers?

In Australia, most employers are required by law to make contributions to their employees’ super funds. Employees can also choose to contribute to their super fund to add to their retirement balance.

To contribute, the employer or individual will need a unique superannuation identifier (USI). SuperStream - the admin system used for processing super contributions - uses the USI to distinguish between funds.  Additionally, super fund trustees need to set up at least one electronic service address (ESA) which helps locate the super fund while safeguarding the fund’s digital privacy. By mentioning the ESA and the unique superannuation identifier, Australian super fund trustees can contribute directly to the specific super fund product, which reduces the chances of contributions getting lost or misdirected. USIs also make it easy to roll over super fund contributions from one super fund to another.

How do I find my unique superannuation identifier?

You may be able to find your USI through the Australian government’s Super Fund Lookup page, which hosts a list of super funds. This list, which is updated every day, contains the Australian Business Number (ABN) and the name of the super fund product in addition to the USI.

Another option is to access the Australian Taxation Office’s Fund USI and SPIN lookup table, which includes the Superannuation Product Identifier Number (SPIN) as well as all of the information hosted on the Super Fund Lookup portal. You can also check if the bank where you’ve opened a savings account maintains a list of popular super funds and their USIs.

Before the Australian government mandated USIs, super contributions were usually referenced using either the SPIN or the ABN, apart from the super fund product’s name. Since all this information is included in the USI database, you can search for the USI if you know any one of the other identifiers. In some cases, the super fund trustees may have chosen to use the SPIN itself as the USI. Also, as USIs were mandated for super funds monitored by the APRA, some SMSFs may still be using their ABNs rather than USIs.

What is a superannuation SPIN code?

The Superannuation Product Identifier Number (SPIN) was the preferred identifier for super fund products until the adoption of the USI in 2014. These numbers were issued only for large-sized APRA-regulated super funds and, as a result, small-sized funds regulated by the APRA and SMSFs may not have a SPIN at all. However, they will probably have an ABN listed against the super fund product name. After the USI system was adopted, the SPINs and ABNs of existing super funds were mapped to USIs using the ATO’s Fund Validation Service (FVS). However, the SPIN may be the same as the USI for some super fund products.

It’s worth remembering that USIs may not have completely replaced SPINs and you may sometimes need to quote both when conducting transactions involving super funds. Also, whether or not you use the SPIN as the USI, you’ll need to create an electronic service address (ESA) for SuperStream which acts as a layer of electronic privacy protecting your super fund data.

You can also access super funds that don’t qualify for a USI, such as SMSFs, using SuperStream if you create an ESA for these funds. The super fund’s trustees can create separate ESAs for different transactions, such as one for super fund contributions and another for super fund rollovers

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Learn more about superannuation

How do you open a superannuation account?

Opening a superannuation account is simple. When you start a job, your employer will give you what’s called a ‘superannuation standard choice form’. Here’s what you need to complete the form:

  • The name of your preferred superannuation fund
  • The fund’s address
  • The fund’s Australian business number (ABN)
  • The fund’s superannuation product identification number (SPIN)
  • The fund’s phone number
  • A letter from the fund trustee confirming that the fund is a complying fund; or written evidence from the fund stating it will accept contributions from your new employer; or details about how your employer can make contributions to the fund

You might want to provide your tax file number as well – while it’s not a legal obligation, it will ensure your contributions will be taxed at the (lower) superannuation rate.

How do you set up superannuation?

Before you set up a superannuation account, you’ll need to check if you’re allowed to choose your own fund. Most Australians can, but this option doesn’t apply to some workers who are covered by industrial agreements or who are members of defined benefits funds.

Assuming you are able to choose your own fund, the next step should be research, because there are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia.

Once you’ve decided on your preferred superannuation fund, head to that provider’s website, where you should be able to fill in an online application or download the appropriate forms. You’ll need your tax file number (assuming you don’t want to be charged a higher tax rate), your contact details and your employer’s details (if you’re employed).

How do you access superannuation?

Accessing your superannuation is a simple administrative procedure – you just ask your fund to pay it. You can access your superannuation in three different ways:

  • Lump sum
  • Account-based pension
  • Part lump sum and part account-based pension

However, please note that your superannuation fund will only be able to make a payout if you meet the ‘conditions of release’. The conditions of release say you can claim your super when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

The preservation age has six different categories:

Date of birth Preservation age
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964 59
From 1 July 1964 60

There are also seven special circumstances under which you can claim your superannuation:

  • Compassionate grounds
  • Severe financial hardship
  • Temporary incapacity
  • Permanent incapacity
  • Superannuation inheritance
  • Superannuation balance under $200
  • Temporary resident departing Australia

Can I take money out of my superannuation fund?

Superannuation is designed to provide Australians with money in their retirement. The government has strict rules around when people can take that money out of their fund because it wants to prevent people eroding their savings before they reach retirement.

As a general rule, you can only take money out of your superannuation fund when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

That said, you can take money out of your superannuation fund early based on one of these seven special conditions:

  • Compassionate grounds
  • Severe financial hardship
  • Temporary incapacity
  • Permanent incapacity
  • Superannuation inheritance
  • Superannuation balance under $200
  • Temporary resident departing Australia

What are ethical investment superannuation funds?

Ethical investment funds limit themselves to making ‘ethical’ investments (which each fund defines according to its own principles). For example, ethical funds might avoid investing in companies or industries that are linked to human suffering or environmental damage.

What happens to my insurance cover if I change superannuation funds?

Some superannuation funds will allow you to transfer your insurance cover, without interruption, if you switch. However, others won’t. So it’s important you check before changing funds.

Am I entitled to superannuation if I'm a part-time employee?

As a part-time employee, you’re entitled to superannuation if:

  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

Can I buy a house with my superannuation?

First home buyers are the only people who can use their superannuation to buy a property. The federal government has created the First Home Super Saver Scheme to help first home buyers save for a deposit. First home buyers can make voluntary contributions of up to $15,000 per year, and $30,000 in total, to their superannuation account. These contributions are taxed at 15 per cent, along with deemed earnings. Withdrawals are taxed at marginal tax rates minus a tax offset of 30 percentage points.

Voluntary contributions to the First Home Super Saver Scheme are not exempt from the $25,000 annual limit on concessional contributions. So if you pay $15,000 per year into the First Home Super Saver Scheme, you have to make sure that you don’t receive more than $10,000 in superannuation payments from your employer and any salary sacrificing.

What is the superannuation rate?

The superannuation rate, or guarantee rate, is the percentage of your salary that your employer must pay into your superannuation fund. The superannuation guarantee has been set at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Is superannuation taxed?

Superannuation is taxed. It is generally taxed at 15 per cent. However, if you earn less than $37,000, you will be automatically reimbursed up to $500 of the tax you paid. Also, if your income plus concessional superannuation contributions exceed $250,000, you will also be charged Division 293 tax. This is an extra 15 per cent tax on your concessional contributions or the amount above $250,000 – whichever is lesser.

How many superannuation funds are there?

There are more than 200 different superannuation funds.

What is the difference between accumulation and defined benefit funds?

A majority of Australians are in accumulation funds. These funds grow according to the amount of money invested and the return on that money.

A minority of Australians are in defined benefit funds – many of which are now closed to new members. These funds give payouts according to specific rules, such as how long the worker has been with their employer and their final salary before they retired.

Can I choose a superannuation fund or does my employer choose one for me?

Most people can choose their own superannuation fund. However, you might not have this option if you are a member of certain defined benefit funds or covered by certain industrial agreements. If you don’t choose a superannuation fund, your employer will choose one for you.

What should I know before getting an SMSF?

Four questions to ask yourself before taking out an SMSF include:

  1. Do I have enough superannuation to justify the higher set-up and running costs?
  2. Am I able to handle complicated compliance obligations?
  3. Am I willing to spend lots of time researching investment options?
  4. Do I have the skill to make big financial decisions?

It’s also worth remembering that ordinary superannuation funds usually offer discounted life insurance and disability insurance. These discounts would no longer be available if you decided to manage your own super.