First Option Bank

Fixed Term Deposit

Max rate

0.60

% p.a

for 3 months

Min. deposit

$25,000

Next rate increased

0.60

% p.a

for 3 months

Interest rate

0.55

% p.a

for 6 months

Balance Amount

$501,375

based on a $500,000 deposit for a duration of 6 months

Real Time Rating™

1.82

/ 5
Max rate

0.60

% p.a

for 3 months

Min. deposit

$25,000

Next rate increased

0.60

% p.a

for 3 months

Interest rate

0.55

% p.a

for 6 months

Balance Amount

$501,375

based on a $500,000 deposit for a duration of 6 months

Real Time Rating™

1.82

/ 5

Quick term deposit review

For Fixed Term Deposit

These are the benefts of this term deposit.

  • 12 month interest rate (for $50k deposit) ranked in the best 20%
  • Automatic maturity rollover

These are the drawbacks of this term deposit.

  • Interest cannot be paid to other institution

Term deposit overview

For Fixed Term Deposit

Features

Min. deposit

$25,000

Automatic maturity rollover

Maturity alert by phone

Maturity alert by email

Joint application available

Minimum Age Requirement

Notice period to withdraw

Is covered by government guarantee

Interest

Interest Calculation Frequency

Interest Payment Frequency Options

At MaturityAnnually

Interest payment via other institution

Interest payment method

Fees

Early withdrawal fee

Rates

First Option Bank term deposits rates

Savings Term$5,000 - $24,999$25,000 - $249,999$250,000 - $500,000
3 months0.50%0.60%0.70%
6 months0.45%0.55%0.65%
1 year0.40%0.50%0.60%
2 years0.40%0.50%0.60%

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FAQs

What are Macquarie Bank’s business term deposit rates?

Macquarie Bank’s business term deposit rates vary depending on the duration you choose. Terms start at one month and go up to five years. 

You can invest any amount between $5000 and $1,000,000 and you won’t be charged a fee. You’ll also have the flexibility of choosing when you want to receive the interest and have the option to roll over the balance once the TD matures. You can ask to have the interest deposited into  another bank account if you wish.

The latest Macquarie Bank term deposit rates can be found here

Can I negotiate a fixed term deposit rate with the bank?

“Can I negotiate a fixed term deposit rate with the bank?” you may be wondering.

Many banks welcome negotiation when it comes to term deposit rates, especially with deposits of over $100,000. Even if your deposit is lower than $100,000, it may be worth a discussion with your bank.

Negotiating with your bank could secure you a higher fixed rate, which will earn you extra interest over your term. You may also discover bonuses or special offers you can acquire through your bank.

Securing the highest interest rate possible is the key to making the most of your term deposit. You may have compared deposits online or discussed your options with a financial adviser, but you also might be wondering about negotiation in order to get a better rate.

What are the deposit rates offered by St. George?

If you’re looking to invest your spare business cash, St. George Bank has a variety of term deposit options. You can choose from terms between one month and five years. St. George Bank business term deposit rates vary depending on the duration. 

You can open an account for $1000 to a maximum amount of $2,000,000. You can also opt to receive the interest amount either in your St. George Bank account or another bank account, either by cheque or direct credit.

On maturity, you can automatically rollover the term deposit or close the account. You also can close the account before maturity, however, you’ll need to give 31 days’ notice to the bank.

What rates offered by Citibank on business term deposits?

Citibank’s business term deposits rates vary based on how long you invest. The bank offers short-term deposits for one, three, six, nine, and 12 months. You can also invest for longer terms between two and five years. The minimum investment is $10,000, and the maximum investment is $2 million.

What are Bankwest business term deposit rates?

Looking to invest some of your business funds with a fixed interest rate? You could consider a business term deposit with Bankwest. Bankwest calls these accounts Business TD Direct, and accepts deposits of amounts between $10,000 and $2,000,000. 

When it comes to Bankwest term deposit rates for business, you can find information here. If you choose a term of over a year, you can ask for interest to be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually or annually. The Bankwest business term deposit rates do, however, vary based on the term length you choose. 

If you need the funds before your term deposit’s maturity date, you need to give 31 days notice. Also withdrawing the funds will impact the interest you earn.  

You can contact a Bankwest business banking specialist by calling on 13 7000 and get more details about business term deposits. 

What are the current AMP Bank business term deposit rates?

Term deposit interest rates are subject to frequent market change. To view the most current AMP Bank business term deposit rates, it’s best to view the provider’s website directly

If you want to earn competitive rates on your fixed deposits for an amount between $100,000 and $500,000, AMP Bank deposit may worth considering. Term deposits with AMP Bank allow you to earn reliable returns for different tenures between one month and five years.

You can also choose when you want to receive the interest; monthly, quarterly, or half-yearly. If you wait until maturity, you’ll earn the full interest.

AMP Bank term deposits do not charge monthly maintenance fees. If you’re at least 13 years and an Australian citizen with a local address, you’re eligible for AMP Bank term deposit.

Are term deposits compounded?

Term deposits can be compounded, depending on what you choose to do with the interest.

There are two ways to receive interest from a term deposit: either a lump sum at maturity; or paid on a regular basis, usually monthly. If you get your interest paid regularly, you can get it paid into a transaction account, or back into the term deposit account. By using this second option, you’re getting interest paid on your interest. In other words, it’s compounding.

Having the money paid into a transaction account means you can access it for your day-to-day spending, while compounding the interest means you get a better overall return on your investment. Both have advantages, depending on your needs, but be aware that some term deposit accounts that pay interest regularly may offer a lower interest rate to offset the effect of compounding.

What is a short term deposit?

Sometimes you only want to tie up your money for a short period, maybe because you want to make a quick return on a large sum, or just to have more flexibility and access to your money. That’s where a short term deposit can come in.

Short term deposits are usually less than 12 months (e.g. 30 days, 90 days, six months or 12 months), though you will still not be able to access your money for the length of the term without incurring a penalty fee.

At the end of the term, you can roll your deposit over, or you can withdraw it. An advantage of short term deposits is that you can take advantage of higher interest rates with a different financial institution, if they are available.

Are term deposits safe?

Term deposits can be a great way to build your savings, but before you invest, you might have one important question. Are term deposits safe?

When it comes to investing your money, you can choose between high-risk and low-risk options. High-risk options tend to have a better potential payout, but you also risk earning no profit at all or even losing your original investment.

Low-risk options tend to earn less profit than high-risk options, but they’re also safer, with little to no risk of losing money. Term deposits fall into the low-risk category.

Term deposits are safe because they’re low-risk, but they’re also protected by the Australian government’s Financial Claims Scheme. This government guarantee will insure your deposit for up to $250,000 per person, per institution, meaning that even if the bank collapses, the government will reimburse you for your deposit.

What is the best interest rate for a fixed term deposit?

The best interest rate for a fixed term deposit changes all the time, as interest rates move up and down and banks compete with each other to win market share.

To find the best interest rate for a fixed term deposit, it’s helpful to understand how interest rates are applied to term deposits.

There are three factors that determine the fixed interest of term deposits:

  1. The size of your deposit
  2. The duration of the term
  3. The frequency of interest paid

Term deposits vary in duration from one month to five years or more. Interest rates generally work on a sliding scale; shorter terms get a lower rate, longer terms get a higher rate.

Here are a couple of examples of how interest is applied to term deposits.

  • A $10,000 term deposit taken out over 12 months, with interest paid at maturity, might receive a fixed interest rate of 2.20 per cent.
  • A $10,000 fixed term deposit taken out over 12 months, with interest paid quarterly, might receive a fixed interest rate of 2.00 per cent.

Using the size of your deposit, the duration of the term and how often you want to be paid interest, you can shop around for the best interest rate for a fixed term deposit.

Can I break a term deposit?

One of the main components of a term deposit is your agreement that you won’t access your money until your term has expired. However, life can hand us unexpected expenses, and you might be asking yourself, “Can I break a term deposit?”

In most cases, you are able to withdraw money early from your term deposit, but it will usually come with a penalty. The penalty amount will vary from bank to bank, which is why it’s important to understand your deposit’s early withdrawal policy.

You should also be aware that some financial institutions enforce a waiting period for early withdrawals. This waiting period is typically up to 31 days and commences after you submit a request to withdraw your funds.

How do you break a term deposit?

If you have found yourself in sudden need of funds, you may be wondering how to break your term deposit and access your savings.

If you need to break your term deposit, your first step should be to check the terms and conditions with your bank or provider. Many banks now require 31 days’ notice before you can access the funds in your term deposit, so in many cases you should first notify your bank that you will be breaking the term.

Once you have notified the bank and know when you will have access to your funds, you will then be liable to pay a breakage fee. Check with your provider to see how much this fee will be. You may also need to sacrifice a percentage of your interest as a penalty for breaking the term early.

Once you know when you will have access to your funds, and how much you will need to pay to do so, you are in a good position to decide whether you want to break your term deposit.

How do I pay tax on term deposits?

Just like your regular income, the interest you earn on term deposits is taxable. You might be wondering, “How do I pay tax on term deposits?” The tax you pay on your interest will depend on the length of your term and when your interest is paid.

You should pay tax on any interest that you have received within the current financial year. For example, if you receive monthly interest payments, these payments should be claimed on your tax return. However, if your term deposit is longer than one year and you will only receive interest at maturity, then you will pay tax on your interest in the year that you receive it.

Paying tax on your interest is much like paying tax on your income. The money you have made in interest should be claimed on your tax return along with any other income in that year.

How do you calculate term deposit interest?

If you’re ready to open a term deposit, there’s a lot you’ve already figured out. You’ve decided on the length of your term and found the best interest rate, but there’s something you still might be wondering. How do you calculate term deposit interest?

One of the easiest ways to calculate term deposit interest is by using a term deposits calculator. However, you can also estimate your total earnings on your own.

A fixed interest rate signifies what percentage of your original balance your term deposit will earn annually. For example, a deposit of $1,000 at an interest rate of 3 per cent will earn three per cent of $1,000 annually – meaning you’ll earn $30 of interest each year.

You can estimate your interest using three variables. Multiply together your deposit amount, interest rate, and term length and you’ll approximate the interest a deposit will earn. For example, if you invest in a term deposit for $5,000 at an interest rate of 3 per cent for two years, your interest would total $300.

Is term deposit interest taxable?

The interest that you earn from your term deposit is considered taxable income. Because your term deposit interest is taxable, it should be disclosed on your annual tax return.

It’s important to note that circumstances may differ depending on whether you provided the account holder with your tax file number (TFN). If you did not supply your bank or other financial institution with your TFN, they are typically required to withhold tax from your interest earnings.

If you’ve invested in a deposit that lasts longer than 12 months, you’ll need to claim your earned interest in the year that you received it. For example, if you receive interest monthly, you’ll need to claim your earnings at the end of the financial year. However, if you only receive interest at maturity, you should claim your earnings in the year that you received the lump sum of interest.

What is a term deposit rate?

The term deposit rate is the agreed interest rate for your term deposit. It remains fixed for the term of the deposit.

For example, if you deposit $5,000 for 12 months at a 2.5 per cent term deposit rate, that 2.5 per cent term deposit rate will be fixed for the entire 12 months and won’t change until the term matures.

The term deposit rate is one of the most important factors to consider when comparing your term deposit options. The general rule of thumb is that the longer the term, the higher the term deposit rate.

Term deposits are a popular type of investment because they’re safe and provide reliable returns.

The return you get on your term deposit will be determined by the amount you initially invest, the amount of time you choose to invest it for, and the term deposit rate.

How long is a term deposit?

A term deposit refers to when you lock your money in an account for a certain period of time and at a specified interest rate. You will not be able to access your money for the length of the agreed term without incurring a penalty fee.

A long term deposit generally refers to a term deposit that lasts for more than 12 months – which in some cases may be as long as 10 years.

Usually, the longer you store your money, the better the interest rate you’ll get, so a long term deposit will tend to pay higher interest than a short term deposit.

At the end of the term, you can roll over the money (plus the interest you’ve made during the term), or you can withdraw it all.

What can a Westpac business term deposit offer me?

If you have a business registered in Australia, you can earn fixed returns on your funds with a Westpac business term deposit. These accounts are offered for a minimum investment amount of $50,000.

Westpac business term deposit interest rates vary based on the term and interest payment frequency that you select.

If you are a Westpac customer and use online banking, you can apply for a Westpac business term deposit online. If you don't have a Westpac account currently, you need to speak with a business banker to discuss your term and repayment options. You can find details on this webpage and can ‘request a callback’ from someone in the business team.

If you are an existing customer you may be eligible for a bonus rate on top of the standard Westpac bank business term deposit rates. You can log in to your bank account to check whether your banking records qualify you for extra interest.

If you open a deposit and need to access your locked funds before the maturity of your term deposit, you must provide 31 days of notice, except in cases of hardship.

What are Bendigo Bank’s business term deposit rates?

Bendigo Bank offers businesses two types of term deposits - Standard and Gold. You can open a Standard term deposit by investing at least the specified minimum amount for a flexible investment period ranging up to five years. A Gold term deposit requires a larger minimum investment over a fixed term, which is currently one year.

However, you can’t add funds to a Standard term deposit after the first seven days, and any withdrawals before the review date need to be done on request. If you’ve opened a Gold term deposit, you can add more funds over the year, but withdrawals may be restricted just as with a standard term deposit.

A Standard term deposit’s interest rate depends on the amount deposited, the frequency of compounding interest, and the deposit term. Further, this interest rate may apply irrespective of how often interest is compounded. On the other hand, Gold term deposits usually offer a flat interest rate no matter how large or small the deposit, with the interest likely compounded every quarter. 

To find out about Bendigo Bank’s current business term deposit rates, visit the banks’ website.

Are term deposits worth it?

Ultimately, whether term deposits will work for you will depend on your particular financial needs.

Term deposits can be a great way to get your money working for you. By locking it away and forgetting about it for a period of time, it can earn interest for you. If you have the interest paid on a regular basis, rather than at maturity, you can either have some extra spending money or you can reinvest it into the term deposit to compound.

Of course, locking your money in a term deposit means you cannot access it for the length of the term, without paying a penalty for early withdrawal. This can remove the temptation to spend the money, while it also earns interest.