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AustralianSuper

AustralianSuper

Balanced

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No. of members: 2727590
Funds under administration: $261b
Public offer:
Product type: Industry-Public Offer
Target market: All Industries
Year started: 2006
announcement

RateCity Says: Make the most of retirement and education webinars, flexible investment choices and mobile app access with Australia’s largest super fund. Read the PDS and TMD at AustralianSuper.com.

Past 5-year return
9.11

% p.a

Admin fee

$138

Calc fees on 50k

$473

SuperRatings awards
SuperRatings Platinum 2022 MyChoice Super15 Yr Platinum Performance 2007-2022Net Benefit 2022MyChoice Super of the Year Finalist 2022
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Past 5-year return
9.11

% p.a

Admin fee

$138

Calc fees on 50k

$473

SuperRatings awards
SuperRatings Platinum 2022 MyChoice Super15 Yr Platinum Performance 2007-2022Net Benefit 2022MyChoice Super of the Year Finalist 2022
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Quick superannuation review

For AustralianSuper

These are the benefits of this superannuation.

  • Strong long-term performance and low fees
  • Flexible investment choice - 11 options and the Member Direct option
  • Digital join process online and Mobile App available
  • Free workplace, retirement and education seminars

AustralianSuper is a multi-industry public offer fund that manages over $230 billion in assets on behalf of more than 2.4 million members, making it the largest industry superannuation funds in Australia. The fund was the winner of the 2022 MySuper of the Year award and joint winner of the 2022 Net Benefit award, and was further nominated as a finalist of the 2022 MyChoice Super of the Year award. AustralianSuper offers a range of 10 investment options to choose from, consisting of 6 PreMixed and 4 DIY Mix investment options, including a Socially Aware option for the ethical investor. Access to term deposits, ETFs, LICs and S&P/ASX300 Index Shares is also provided via the Member Direct option; however, additional costs may be incurred. The Balanced option has provided strong investment returns to members, outperforming the SuperRatings Index over each time period assessed to 30 June 2021.Fees are lower than the industry average across all account balances assessed. The fund does not charge a buy-sell spread or a switching fee. A full suite of insurance cover is offered, with Basic Death, Total & Permanent Disablement (TPD) and Income Protection (IP) insurance cover automatically provided to eligible members upon joining the fund. IP covers up to $30,000 a month or 85% of monthly salary with a benefit period of 2 years, 5 years or to age 65, following a 30- or 60-day waiting period. Members can apply to increase cover following the occurrence of a prescribed Life Event without additional underwriting.Additional benefits available include a range of educational materials along with videos and webinars, interactive tools and calculators, and financial planning services. The fund's member online account and mobile app further allow members to view and update their account details, as well as perform transactions.

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Superannuation overview

For AustralianSuper

TMD

Features

Variety of options

Binding nominations

Account size discount

Online Access

Home loans

Financial planning service

Non-lapsing binding nominations

Employer size discount

Anti-detriment payments

Credit cards

Insurance Cover

Health insurance

Insurance life event increases

Total and permanent disability cover

Long term income protection

Fees

Admin fee

$138

Administration fee (%)

0.04%

Switching fee

$0

Investment fee

0.63%

Indirect cost ratio (%)

0.00%

Exit fee

$0
Available
Not available
Data not captured

Target Market Determination

Visit AustralianSuper to view Target Market Determination.

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Embed

Fund fees vs. Industry average
THIS FUND
INDUSTRY AVERAGE
Fund past-5-year return vs. Industry average
THIS FUND
INDUSTRY AVERAGE
Investment allocation
INTERNATIONAL SHARES
AUSTRALIAN SHARES
PROPERTY
ALTERNATIVES
FIXED INTEREST
CASH
OTHER
Investment option performance
BALANCED
CONSERVATIVE BALANCE
DIVERSIFIED FIXED INTEREST
GROWTH
AUSTRALIAN SHARES
INTERNATIONAL SHARES
CAPITAL STABLE
PROPERTY
CASH
+ View additional option performance information

FAQs

How do you get superannuation?

You’re automatically entitled to superannuation if:

  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

How do you find superannuation?

Lost superannuation refers to savings in an account that you’ve forgotten about. This can happen if you’ve opened several different accounts over the years while moving from job to job.

You can use your MyGov account to see details of all your superannuation accounts, including any you might have forgotten. Alternatively, you can fill in a ‘Searching for lost super’ form and send it to the Australian Taxation Office, which will then search on your behalf.

How do you claim superannuation?

There are three different ways you can claim your superannuation:

  • Lump sum
  • Account-based pension
  • Part lump sum and part account-based pension

Two rules apply if you choose to receive an account-based pension, or income stream:

  • You must receive payments at least once per year
  • You must withdraw a minimum amount per year
    • Age 55-64 = 4%
    • Age 65-74 = 5%
    • Age 75-79 = 6%
    • Age 80-84 = 7%
    • Age 85-89 = 9%
    • Age 90-94 = 11%
    • Age 95+ = 14%

If you want to work out how long your account-based pension might last, click here to access ASIC’s account-based pension calculator.

Is superannuation paid on unused annual leave?

If your employment is terminated, superannuation will not be paid on unused annual leave.

Am I entitled to superannuation if I'm a part-time employee?

As a part-time employee, you’re entitled to superannuation if:

  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

How can I increase my superannuation?

You can increase your superannuation through a ‘salary sacrifice’. This is where your employer takes part of your pre-tax salary and pays it directly into your superannuation account. Like regular superannuation contributions, salary sacrifices are taxed at 15 per cent when they are paid into the fund.

When did superannuation start in Australia?

Australia’s modern superannuation system – in which employers make compulsory contributions to their employees – started in 1992. However, before that, there were various restricted superannuation schemes applying to certain employees in certain industries. The very first superannuation scheme was introduced in the 19th century.

Can I choose a superannuation fund or does my employer choose one for me?

Most people can choose their own superannuation fund. However, you might not have this option if you are a member of certain defined benefit funds or covered by certain industrial agreements. If you don’t choose a superannuation fund, your employer will choose one for you.

What is the difference between accumulation and defined benefit funds?

A majority of Australians are in accumulation funds. These funds grow according to the amount of money invested and the return on that money.

A minority of Australians are in defined benefit funds – many of which are now closed to new members. These funds give payouts according to specific rules, such as how long the worker has been with their employer and their final salary before they retired.

Am I entitled to superannuation if I'm a contractor?

As a contractor, you’re entitled to superannuation if:

  • The contract is mainly for your labour
  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

Please note that you’re entitled to superannuation even if you have an Australian business number (ABN).

How much extra superannuation can I add to my fund?

There is an annual limit of $25,000 for concessional contributions – that is, money paid by your employer and extra money you pay into your account through salary sacrificing. There is also a limit on non-concessional contributions. Australians aged between 65 and 74 have a limit of $100,000 per year. Australians aged under 65 have a limit of $300,000 every three years.

Who can open a superannuation account?

Superannuation accounts can be opened by Australians, permanent residents and temporary residents. You’re automatically entitled to superannuation if:

  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

What are the age pension's age rules?

Australians must be aged at least 65 years and 6 months to access the age pension. This eligibility age is scheduled to increase according to the following schedule:

Date Eligibility age
1 July 2019 66 years
1 July 2021 66 years and 6 months
1 July 2023 67 years

Is superannuation paid on overtime?

As the Australian Taxation Office explains, there are times when superannuation is paid on overtime and times when it isn’t.

Here is the ATO’s summary:

Payment type Is superannuation paid?
Overtime hours – award stipulates ordinary hours to be worked and employee works additional hours for which they are paid overtime rates No
Overtime hours – agreement prevails over award No
Agreement supplanting award removes distinction between ordinary hours and other hours Yes – all hours worked
No ordinary hours of work stipulated Yes – all hours worked
Casual employee: shift loadings Yes
Casual employee: overtime payments No
Casual employee whose hours are paid at overtime rates due to a ‘bandwidth’ clause No
Piece-rates – no ordinary hours of work stipulated Yes
Overtime component of earnings based on hourly-driving-rate method stipulated in award No

Can my employer use money from my superannuation account?

No, your employer can’t touch the money that is paid into your superannuation account.

What are reportable employer superannuation contributions?

Reportable employer superannuation contributions are special contributions that an employer makes on top of the regular compulsory contributions. One example would be contributions made as part of a salary sacrifice arrangement.

What will the superannuation fund do with my money?

Your money will be invested in an investment option of your choosing.

What is a superannuation fund?

A superannuation fund is an institution that is legally allowed to hold and invest your superannuation. There are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia. They come in five different types:

  • Retail funds
  • Industry funds
  • Public sector funds
  • Corporate funds
  • Self-managed super funds

Retail funds are usually run by banks or investment companies.

Industry funds were originally designed for workers from a particular industry, but are now open to anyone.

Public sector funds were originally designed for people working for federal or state government departments. Most are still reserved for government employees.

Corporate funds are arranged by employers for their employees.

Self-managed super funds are private superannuation funds that allow people to directly invest their money.

What age can I withdraw my superannuation?

You can withdraw your superannuation (or at least some of it) when you reach ‘preservation age’. The preservation age is based on date of birth. Here are the six different categories:

Date of birth Preservation age
Before 1 July 1960 55
1 July 1960 – 30 June 1961 56
1 July 1961 – 30 June 1962 57
1 July 1962 – 30 June 1963 58
1 July 1963 – 30 June 1964 59
From 1 July 1964 60

When you reach preservation age, you can withdraw all your superannuation if you’re retired. If you’re still working, you can begin a ‘transition to retirement’, which allows you to withdraw 10 per cent of their superannuation each financial year.

You can also withdraw all your superannuation once you reach 65 years.

How do you pay superannuation?

Superannuation is paid by employers to employees. Employers are required to pay superannuation to all their staff if the staff are:

  • Over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • Under 18, work more than 30 hours per week and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

This applies even if the staff are casual employees, part-time employees, contractors (provided the contract is mainly for their labour) or temporary residents.

Currently, the superannuation rate is currently 9.5 per cent of an employee’s ordinary time earnings. This is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Employers must pay superannuation at least four times per year. The due dates are 28 January, 28 April, 28 July and 28 October.