Macquarie Bank

Macquarie Wrap - Super Consolidator 2

Past 5-year return
New
Admin fee

$528

Calc fees on 50k

$823

SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver
Past 5-year return
New
Admin fee

$528

Calc fees on 50k

$823

SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver

Based on your details, you can compare and save on the following superannuation

Pros and Cons

Pros and Cons

  • Extensive investment menu including direct listed securities investments
  • Rich adviser functionality
  • Flexible insurance options

Summary

Macquarie Wrap Super Consolidator 2 is part of the Consolidator suite of Wrap products offered by Macquarie Investment Management Limited and is designed for members who have advisers to assist them with personal advice in respect to their investments. An initial investment of $10,000 is required to commence membership.Macquarie Wrap Consolidator offers two investment menus with an excellent range of investment options, including over 500 managed investments, Australian listed securities, a variety of term deposits and Separately Managed Account (SMA) Model Portfolios. The Vanguard Growth Index Fund outperformed the relevant SuperRatings Index over all assessed time periods to 30 June 2020.Fees for the Elevate investment menu are lower than the industry average across medium and large account balances assessed and a reduced administration fee applies to account balances in the Elevate menu over $300,000. Additional SMA administration and Cash Hub fees may apply. The fund does not charge an investment switching fee, however; a buy-sell spread may apply.Members have access to a full suite of insurance cover, which is available through one or more insurance providers, including Death and Terminal Illness, Total and Permanent Disability and Income Protection. Premiums are tailored on an individual basis, and we are therefore unable to provide an accurate assessment at this time.Members and their adviser can track investments and access comprehensive reports online, while online trading is also available to advisers. Additionally, members have access to an automatic rebalancing facility to ensure their account stays in-line with their investment strategy.

Features and Fees

Macquarie Bank Fees and Features

Features

Variety of options

Binding nominations

Account size discount

Online Access

Home loans

Financial planning service

Non-lapsing binding nominations

Employer size discount

Anti-detriment payments

Credit cards

Insurance Cover

Health insurance

Insurance life event increases

Total and permanent disability cover

Long term income protection

Fees

Admin fee

$528

Administration fee (%)

0.3%

Switching fee

$0

Investment fee

0.29%

Indirect cost ratio (%)

Exit fee

$0

Pros and Cons

  • Extensive investment menu including direct listed securities investments
  • Rich adviser functionality
  • Flexible insurance options

Macquarie Wrap Super Consolidator 2 is part of the Consolidator suite of Wrap products offered by Macquarie Investment Management Limited and is designed for members who have advisers to assist them with personal advice in respect to their investments. An initial investment of $10,000 is required to commence membership.Macquarie Wrap Consolidator offers two investment menus with an excellent range of investment options, including over 500 managed investments, Australian listed securities, a variety of term deposits and Separately Managed Account (SMA) Model Portfolios. The Vanguard Growth Index Fund outperformed the relevant SuperRatings Index over all assessed time periods to 30 June 2020.Fees for the Elevate investment menu are lower than the industry average across medium and large account balances assessed and a reduced administration fee applies to account balances in the Elevate menu over $300,000. Additional SMA administration and Cash Hub fees may apply. The fund does not charge an investment switching fee, however; a buy-sell spread may apply.Members have access to a full suite of insurance cover, which is available through one or more insurance providers, including Death and Terminal Illness, Total and Permanent Disability and Income Protection. Premiums are tailored on an individual basis, and we are therefore unable to provide an accurate assessment at this time.Members and their adviser can track investments and access comprehensive reports online, while online trading is also available to advisers. Additionally, members have access to an automatic rebalancing facility to ensure their account stays in-line with their investment strategy.

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Macquarie Bank Fees and Features

Features

Variety of options

Binding nominations

Account size discount

Online Access

Home loans

Financial planning service

Non-lapsing binding nominations

Employer size discount

Anti-detriment payments

Credit cards

Insurance Cover

Health insurance

Insurance life event increases

Total and permanent disability cover

Long term income protection

Fees

Admin fee

$528

Administration fee (%)

0.3%

Switching fee

$0

Investment fee

0.29%

Indirect cost ratio (%)

Exit fee

$0
Fund fees vs. Industry average
THIS FUND
INDUSTRY AVERAGE
Fund past-5-year return vs. Industry average
THIS FUND
INDUSTRY AVERAGE
Investment allocation
INTERNATIONAL SHARES
AUSTRALIAN SHARES
PROPERTY
ALTERNATIVES
FIXED INTEREST
CASH
OTHER
Investment option performance
BALANCED
SECURE
DIVERSIFIED FIXED INTEREST
CAPITAL STABLE
PROPERTY
CASH
+ View additional option performance information
Past 5-year return
New
Admin fee

$528

Company
Macquarie Bank
Calc fees on 50k

$823

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver
Go to site
More details
Past 5-year return
6.62%
Admin fee

$396

Company
Macquarie Bank
Calc fees on 50k

$541

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver
Go to site
More details
Past 5-year return
New
Admin fee

$0

Company
Macquarie Bank
Calc fees on 50k

$505

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver
Go to site
More details
Past 5-year return
New
Admin fee

$696

Company
Macquarie Bank
Calc fees on 50k

$841

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver
Go to site
More details
Past 5-year return
New
Admin fee

$0

Company
Macquarie Bank
Calc fees on 50k

$530

Features
Advisory services
Death insurance
Income protection
Online access
Term deposits
Variety of options
SuperRatings awards
MyChoice Silver
Go to site
More details

FAQs

How can I increase my superannuation?

You can increase your superannuation through a ‘salary sacrifice’. This is where your employer takes part of your pre-tax salary and pays it directly into your superannuation account. Like regular superannuation contributions, salary sacrifices are taxed at 15 per cent when they are paid into the fund.

What contributions can SMSFs accept?

SMSFs can accept mandated employer contributions from an employer at any time (Funds need an electronic service address to receive the contributions).

However, SMSFs can’t accept contributions from members who don’t have tax file numbers.

Also, they generally can’t accept assets as contributions from members and they generally can’t accept non-mandated contributions for members who are 75 or older.

What is a superannuation fund?

A superannuation fund is an institution that is legally allowed to hold and invest your superannuation. There are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia. They come in five different types:

  • Retail funds
  • Industry funds
  • Public sector funds
  • Corporate funds
  • Self-managed super funds

Retail funds are usually run by banks or investment companies.

Industry funds were originally designed for workers from a particular industry, but are now open to anyone.

Public sector funds were originally designed for people working for federal or state government departments. Most are still reserved for government employees.

Corporate funds are arranged by employers for their employees.

Self-managed super funds are private superannuation funds that allow people to directly invest their money.

What is MySuper?

MySuper accounts are basic, low-fee accounts. If you don’t nominate a superannuation fund, your employer must choose one for you that offers a MySuper account.

MySuper accounts offer two investment options:

  1. Single diversified investment strategy

Your fund assigns you a risk strategy and investment profile, which remain unchanged throughout your working life.

  1. Lifecycle investment strategy

Your fund assigns you an investment strategy based on your age, and then changes it as you get older. Younger workers are given strategies that emphasise growth assets

How long after divorce can you claim superannuation?

You or your partner could be forced to surrender part of your superannuation if you divorce, just like with other assets.

You can file a claim for division of property – including superannuation – as soon as you divorce. However, the claim has to be filed within one year of the divorce.

Your superannuation could be affected even if you’re in a de facto relationship – that is, living together as a couple without being officially married.

In that case, the claim has to be filed within two years of the date of separation.

Either way, the first thing to consider is whether you’re a member of a standard, APRA-regulated superannuation fund or if you’re a member of a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF), because different rules apply.

Standard superannuation funds

If your relationship breaks down, your superannuation savings might be divided by court order or by agreement.

The rules of the superannuation fund will dictate whether this transfer happens immediately, or in the future when the person who has to make the transfer is allowed to access the rest of their superannuation (i.e. at or near retirement).

Click here for more information.

SMSFs

If your relationship breaks down, you must continue to observe the trust deed of your SMSF.

So if you and your partner are both members of the same SMSF, neither party is allowed to use the fund to inflict ‘punishment’ – such as by excluding the other party from the decision-making process or refusing their request to roll their money into another superannuation fund.

This no-punishment rule applies even if the two parties are involved in legal proceedings.

Click here for more information.

Financial consequences

Superannuation funds often charge a fee for splitting accounts after a relationship breakdown.

Splitting superannuation can also impact the size of your total super balance and how your super is taxed.

Click here for more information.

How do I change my superannuation fund?

Changing superannuation funds is a common and straightforward process. You can do it through your MyGov account or by filling out a rollover form and sending it to your new fund. You’ll also have to provide proof of identity.

What is the difference between accumulation and defined benefit funds?

A majority of Australians are in accumulation funds. These funds grow according to the amount of money invested and the return on that money.

A minority of Australians are in defined benefit funds – many of which are now closed to new members. These funds give payouts according to specific rules, such as how long the worker has been with their employer and their final salary before they retired.

How do I combine several superannuation accounts into one account?

The process used to consolidate several superannuation accounts into one is the same process used to change superannuation funds. This can be done through your MyGov account or by filling out a rollover form and sending it to your chosen fund.

Do I have to pay myself superannuation if I'm self-employed?

No, self-employed workers don’t have to pay themselves superannuation. However, if you do pay yourself superannuation, you will probably be able to claim a tax deduction.

What are government co-contributions?

A government co-contribution is a bonus payment from the federal government into your superannuation account – but it comes with conditions. First, the government will only make a co-contribution if you make a personal contribution. Second, the government will only contribute a maximum of $500. Third, the government will only make co-contributions for people on low and medium incomes. The Australian Taxation Office will calculation whether you’re entitled to a government co-contribution when you lodge your tax return. The size of any co-contribution depends on the size of your personal contribution and income.

When did superannuation start in Australia?

Australia’s modern superannuation system – in which employers make compulsory contributions to their employees – started in 1992. However, before that, there were various restricted superannuation schemes applying to certain employees in certain industries. The very first superannuation scheme was introduced in the 19th century.

How do you pay superannuation?

Superannuation is paid by employers to employees. Employers are required to pay superannuation to all their staff if the staff are:

  • Over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • Under 18, work more than 30 hours per week and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

This applies even if the staff are casual employees, part-time employees, contractors (provided the contract is mainly for their labour) or temporary residents.

Currently, the superannuation rate is currently 9.5 per cent of an employee’s ordinary time earnings. This is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Employers must pay superannuation at least four times per year. The due dates are 28 January, 28 April, 28 July and 28 October.

Can I transfer money from overseas into my superannuation account?

Yes, you can transfer money from overseas into your superannuation account – under certain conditions. First, you must provide your tax file number to your fund. Second, if you are aged between 65 and 74, you must have worked at least 40 hours within 30 consecutive days in a financial year. (Australians under 65 aren’t subject to a work test; Australians aged 75 and over cannot receive contributions to their superannuation account.)

Money transferred from overseas will generally count to both your concessional contributions limit and your non-concessional contributions limit. You will have to pay income tax on the applicable fund earnings component of any money transferred from overseas. You might also be liable for excess contributions tax.

What compliance obligations does an SMSF have?

SMSFs must maintain comprehensive records and submit to annual audits.

How does superannuation work?

Superannuation is paid by employers to employees, at least once every three months. The ‘superannuation guarantee’ is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary. The guarantee is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Superannuation is generally taxed at 15 per cent. However, if you earn less than $37,000, you will be automatically reimbursed up to $500 of the tax you paid. Also, if your income plus concessional superannuation contributions exceed $250,000, you will also be charged Division 293 tax. This is an extra 15 per cent tax on your concessional contributions or the amount above $250,000 – whichever is lesser.

You can withdraw your superannuation when you meet the ‘conditions of release’. The conditions of release say you can claim your super when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

 

How do you create a superannuation account?

Before you create a superannuation account, you’ll need to check if you’re allowed to choose your own fund. Most Australians can, but this option doesn’t apply to some workers who are covered by industrial agreements or who are members of defined benefits funds.

Assuming you are able to choose your own fund, the next step should be research, because there are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia.

Once you’ve decided on your preferred superannuation fund, head to that provider’s website, where you should be able to fill in an online application or download the appropriate forms. You’ll need your tax file number (assuming you don’t want to be charged a higher tax rate), your contact details and your employer’s details (if you’re employed).

How do you get superannuation?

You’re automatically entitled to superannuation if:

  • You’re over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • You’re under 18, you work more than 30 hours per week and you earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

What are reportable employer superannuation contributions?

Reportable employer superannuation contributions are special contributions that an employer makes on top of the regular compulsory contributions. One example would be contributions made as part of a salary sacrifice arrangement.

What is superannuation?

Superannuation is money set aside for your retirement. This money is automatically paid into your superannuation fund by your employer.

How many superannuation funds are there?

There are more than 200 different superannuation funds.