Australian growth super funds see best returns in seven years

Australian growth super funds see best returns in seven years

Australian superannuation funds performed strongly in 2019, with growth funds seeing a median return of 14.7 per cent, according to superannuation research firm Chant West.

That median growth was the best return in a calendar year since 2013.

But experts warn against expecting this level of growth to continue in the long run.

UniSuper Balanced took the top gong in Chant West’s best performing growth funds, with a return of 18.4 per cent.

The weakest performing growth fund saw a 10.5 per cent return, almost 9 per cent above the inflation rate.

Growth fund returns in the past 10 years have averaged at 7.9 per cent per annum.

Chant West senior investment manager Mano Mohankumar called it a “tremendous run” but said it should be noted that growth funds were not built to deliver that level of returns in the long term.

A typical superannuation return is about 3.5 per cent above inflation per annum, equivalent to between 5.5 per cent and 6 per cent in the long term or lower given the low inflation environment, Mr Mohankumar said.

“So it would be a mistake to assume that the level of returns over the past decade will continue,” he said.

“At some stage they’re going to revert to more ‘normal’ levels, and there will be more challenging times ahead.”

A growth super fund is one that invests 61 to 80 per cent in higher risk growth assets, such as shares and property, with the aim of achieving higher returns in the long term. This also means losses can be higher in a bad market, compared with super funds with a lower level of risk.

The majority of Australians have a stake in growth super funds, according to Chant West.

Should I switch my super fund?

It could be worthwhile to not only monitor how your super performance is tracking, but also to find out how much you are paying in fees to your super provider.

A fund with lower fees could prevent your super balance from diminishing over time.

If you’re thinking of switching super funds, it’s best to speak to a professional financial advisor who can give you advice based on your personal situation.

You can also consider using RateCity’s comparison tool to look at what your superannuation options are.

Top 10 performing growth funds (12 months to December 2019)

Fund name

Growth

UniSuper Balanced

18.4%

Tasplan Balanced

17.6%

CFS FirstChoice Growth

17.4%

Australian Ethical Super Balanced

17.2%

AustralianSuper Balanced

17.0%

BT Multi-Manager Balanced

16.9%

Aon smartMonday Balanced Growth

16.4%

IOOF MultiMix Balanced Growth

16.2%

LGIAsuper Diversified Growth

16.1%

Legal Super My Super Balanced

16.0%

Source: Chant West

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Learn more about superannuation

What is the superannuation rate?

The superannuation rate, or guarantee rate, is the percentage of your salary that your employer must pay into your superannuation fund. The superannuation guarantee has been set at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How do you pay superannuation?

Superannuation is paid by employers to employees. Employers are required to pay superannuation to all their staff if the staff are:

  • Over 18 and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month
  • Under 18, work more than 30 hours per week and earn more than $450 before tax in a calendar month

This applies even if the staff are casual employees, part-time employees, contractors (provided the contract is mainly for their labour) or temporary residents.

Currently, the superannuation rate is currently 9.5 per cent of an employee’s ordinary time earnings. This is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Employers must pay superannuation at least four times per year. The due dates are 28 January, 28 April, 28 July and 28 October.

How is superannuation calculated?

Superannuation is calculated at the rate of 9.5 per cent of your gross salary and wages. So if you had a salary of $50,000, your superannuation would be 9.5 per cent of that, or $4,750. This would be paid on top of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How much is superannuation in Australia?

Superannuation in Australia is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How does superannuation work?

Superannuation is paid by employers to employees, at least once every three months. The ‘superannuation guarantee’ is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary. The guarantee is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

Superannuation is generally taxed at 15 per cent. However, if you earn less than $37,000, you will be automatically reimbursed up to $500 of the tax you paid. Also, if your income plus concessional superannuation contributions exceed $250,000, you will also be charged Division 293 tax. This is an extra 15 per cent tax on your concessional contributions or the amount above $250,000 – whichever is lesser.

You can withdraw your superannuation when you meet the ‘conditions of release’. The conditions of release say you can claim your super when you reach:

  • Age 65
  • Your ‘preservation age’ and retire
  • Your preservation age and begin a ‘transition to retirement’ while still working

 

What is a superannuation fund?

A superannuation fund is an institution that is legally allowed to hold and invest your superannuation. There are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia. They come in five different types:

  • Retail funds
  • Industry funds
  • Public sector funds
  • Corporate funds
  • Self-managed super funds

Retail funds are usually run by banks or investment companies.

Industry funds were originally designed for workers from a particular industry, but are now open to anyone.

Public sector funds were originally designed for people working for federal or state government departments. Most are still reserved for government employees.

Corporate funds are arranged by employers for their employees.

Self-managed super funds are private superannuation funds that allow people to directly invest their money.

How much is superannuation?

Superannuation is currently 9.5 per cent – which means that your employer must pay you superannuation equivalent to 9.5 per cent of your salary.

The ‘superannuation guarantee’, as it is known, has been at 9.5 per cent since the 2014-15 financial year. It is scheduled to rise to 10.0 per cent in 2021-22, 10.5 per cent in 2022-23, 11.0 per cent in 2023-24, 11.5 per cent in 2024-25 and 12.0 per cent in 2025-26.

How many superannuation funds are there?

There are more than 200 different superannuation funds.

What is salary sacrificing?

A salary sacrifice is where your employer takes part of your pre-tax salary and pays it directly into your superannuation account. Salary sacrifices come out of your pre-tax income, whereas personal contributions come out of your after-tax income.

What are ethical investment superannuation funds?

Ethical investment funds limit themselves to making ‘ethical’ investments (which each fund defines according to its own principles). For example, ethical funds might avoid investing in companies or industries that are linked to human suffering or environmental damage.

What fees do superannuation funds charge?

Superannuation funds can charge a range of fees, including:

  • Activity-based fees – for specific, irregular services, such as splitting an account after a divorce
  • Administration fees – to cover the cost of managing your account
  • Advice fees – for personal investment advice
  • Buy/sell spread fees – when you make contributions, switches and withdrawals
  • Exit fees – when you close your account
  • Investment fees – to cover the cost of managing your investments
  • Switching fees – when you choose a new investment option within the same fund

How do you set up superannuation?

Before you set up a superannuation account, you’ll need to check if you’re allowed to choose your own fund. Most Australians can, but this option doesn’t apply to some workers who are covered by industrial agreements or who are members of defined benefits funds.

Assuming you are able to choose your own fund, the next step should be research, because there are more than 200 different superannuation funds in Australia.

Once you’ve decided on your preferred superannuation fund, head to that provider’s website, where you should be able to fill in an online application or download the appropriate forms. You’ll need your tax file number (assuming you don’t want to be charged a higher tax rate), your contact details and your employer’s details (if you’re employed).

What will the superannuation fund do with my money?

Your money will be invested in an investment option of your choosing.

What compliance obligations does an SMSF have?

SMSFs must maintain comprehensive records and submit to annual audits.