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Mazda is a Japanese car manufacturer that has been around since the 1920s. Popular for its compact and affordable passenger cars, Mazda operates out of its Australian office in Mulgrave, Victoria, and from international offices around the world.

Mazda’s national network of dealers and support staff allows it to keep its Australian customers consistently satisfied. With sedans, hatchbacks, SUVs and more available, Mazda tends to be popular with everyday “mum and dad” customers.

About Mazda’s cars

Mazda’s range of vehicle models includes:

  • Mazda 2 in hatch and sedan, from $16,490, designed to be small, stylish and exciting.
  • Mazda 3 in hatch and sedan, from $21,490, combining power with efficiency.
  • Mazda 6 in sedan and wagon, from $36,346, with sophisticated, high-quality design.
  • Mazda CX-3 small SUV, from $23,990, featuring timeless design and state of the art technology.
  • Mazda CX-5 medium SUV, from $32,990, featuring luxurious trims and touches.
  • Mazda CX-8 large SUV, from $47,113, offering versatility and efficient use of space.
  • Mazda CX-9 large SUV, from $47,290, a luxury vehicle for the whole family
  • Mazda MX-5 in soft top or RF, from $37,986, designed to provide responsive driving performance.
  • Mazda BT-50 in single cab, freestyle cab or dual cab, from $28,990, a powerful design with smart features.

Mazda review

Mazda CX-3

Mazda is a popular car brand in Australia, with a significant market share, having operated in Australia for decades. From passenger models such as the Mazda 3, to larger SUVs like the Mazda CX-9, Mazda vehicles make frequent appearances in several different yearly top seller-lists.

Mazda’s vehicles range from budget models to those with mid-range pricing, making them decent all-around choices for Australians from all walks of life. With over 130 dealerships around the country, it’s unlikely you’d have to go far to test drive a vehicle that may suit your needs.

Mazda’s technology is intended to help improve the efficiency and safety of its vehicles, while maintaining an elegant design. Mazda is also adding new connectivity features to its cars to help integrate your smart devices into your driving experience.

How can I get a Mazda car loan?

Most Mazda dealers will have a finance option available, however dealer finance or direct-to-lender finance isn’t always the best option for every car buyer. To help you work out which car loan may be right for you, you can compare the available options at a comparison website, or get expert advice from a finance broker.

How much you can borrow and what interest rate you’ll receive may depend on your financial situation, including your credit score. You may be able to borrow more than your Mazda’s purchase price to pay for insurance and other expenses, though this may cost you more in interest over the long run.

Secured Mazda car loans use your vehicle’s value as collateral, so you may enjoy a lower interest rate, though you risk losing your car if you can’t make the repayments. Unsecured Mazda loans can be more flexible, though they may cost more in interest charges.

How much does a Mazda car loan cost?

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Here are the approximate running costs for three different Mazda models, based on RACQ category averages:

Model Category Cents/km Average $ per week
Mazda 2 Small 55.2c $159.21
Mazda CX-5 Medium SUV 71.9c $207.31
Mazda BT-50 4WD Utility 84.8c $244.55

Here’s how much a five-year loan will cost for three different Mazda models if you borrow 100 per cent of the purchase price over five years:

Model Price/loan Total repayments at 6% Total repayments at 8% Total repayments at 10%
Mazda 2 $16,490

$19,128

$20,061 $21,022
Mazda CX-5 $32,990 $38,267 $40,135 $42,056
Mazda BT-50 $47,990 $55,667 $58,384 $61,179

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Frequently asked questions

How do you get a car loan?

There are four different ways you can get a car loan. You can go straight to a lender. You can get a finance broker to organise a car loan for you. You can get ‘dealer finance’ – which is when the car dealer organises a car loan for you. Or you can organise your own car loan through a comparison website, like RateCity.

Whichever method you choose, you will need to provide proof of identification, proof of income and proof of savings. So you may be asked for any combination of passport, driver’s licence, bank statements, payslips, tax returns and utility bills. You might also be asked to provide proof of insurance.

How much is my car worth?

If you own a car, it may be something that can help you bring down the cost of your next vehicle purchase through its sale. However, before you can do that you’ll want to find out how much your car is worth.

Your car’s worth can depend upon various aspects, including:

  • Age
  • Condition
  • Model and make

A great starting place for aspects of this includes websites that offer online valuations, allowing you to enter your car’s make, model, year, badge and description, with the listed results displaying a price guide based on both selling your car privately and through a dealership.

Both have pros and cons, as cars can be very profitable, something that will no doubt impact any chance you have to make the most of your car’s value upon sale. Dealerships will try to profit on your trade-in by buying it for less than they can sell it for, so you shouldn’t expect the same price selling a car to a dealer that you would necessarily get selling a car privately.

How much is your car worth?

If you already own a car, you could potentially bring down the cost by selling your car in the process. Before that happens, though, you’ll need to find out how much your car is worth.

One of the first places to find this value is to research the value of your current car, giving you an idea of roughly how much it’s worth in its peak condition.

There are plenty of websites that offer a free online valuation, allowing you to enter your car’s make, model, year, badge and description, with results listing a price guide based on both selling your car privately and through a dealership.

Of course, dealerships will try to profit on your trade-in by buying it for less than they can sell it, making it highly unlikely that you’ll get the same price selling a car to a dealer as you would selling a car privately.

However, private car sales can be costly and can take months to sell, making car trading more convenient with a guaranteed return, even if you may not be able to realise the total value of your car’s worth.

Remember that everything is negotiable. If the dealership is offering you less for your trade than you wanted, try to negotiate elsewhere to gain that money back. Start by negotiating on the price of the trade and then ask them if they can give you a further discount on your new car.

Can I buy a car as a student?

Buying a car is a huge financial decision, and shy of marriage and purchasing a house (or perhaps around the world travels), it may be the biggest financial decision you make. But if you’re looking at your empty pockets, don’t despair! Your dream of owning your own car could become a reality, if you look for and compare the right car loans for your circumstances.

Where can I get a student car loan?

Student car loans are not a necessarily a product in and of themselves, but what you may be looking for is a guarantor car loan.

A guarantor car loan has a third-party act as a form of guarantee for your loan application, telling the bank or lender that if you default on your loan, someone will pay the loan repayments.

Going guarantor on a car loan is no new thing, and before internet-based credit scores, guarantor car loan applicants would apply for loans with a guarantor or property owner who could vouch for the person borrowing the loan.

To get a guarantor car loan, you’ll need someone willing to act as a guarantor for your car loan.

What are the pros and cons of guarantor car loans?

Like all things, there are positives and negatives to guarantor car loans, though one may outweigh the other depending on your needs.

Guarantor car loan pros may include that you’re more likely to be approved for a long if you have no credit or a history with bad credit, that you’re more likely to secure a car loan with a lower interest rate, and that because your guarantor car loan is based on a relationship, you will be more inclined to meet your repayment schedule.

However, there are negatives, as well. Guarantor car loan cons may include leaving a detrimental mark on a personal relationship with added strain if you don’t meet your repayments, and you may take out a loan that you can’t actually afford.

Weighing these pros and cons will give you a greater understanding of whether a guarantor loan is ideal for your circumstances.

What is an establishment fee?

Some lenders will charge you an establishment fee, or one-off upfront fee, to cover the cost of setting up your car loan.

What is a balloon payment?

Some lenders will offer borrowers reduced monthly repayments in return for a one-off lump sum – or balloon payment – that the borrower has to pay at the end of the loan. Generally, the total repayments on a loan with a balloon structure will be higher than a loan without.

What is a car loan calculator?

A car loan calculator is an online tool that helps consumers understand how much they would have to repay under different scenarios. Consumers can create these different scenarios by entering different borrowing amounts, interest rates, loan terms and repayment schedules into the car loan calculator.

What is trade-in value?

The trade-in value is the price you could realistically charge if you were to sell your car to a dealer while buying a replacement vehicle. Generally, a car’s trade-in value is less than its market value. That’s because the dealer has no interest in buying your car unless it can make a profit – which can only be done if the dealer has room to increase the price.

What is a refinance?

A refinance is when you swap one car loan with another. For example, you might take out a car loan with Lender X because it is the best on the market at the time – but two years later, you might switch to Lender Y because you discover that it now has the best loan. Conditions and fees often apply when you refinance.

What is a redraw facility?

A redraw facility allows you to re-borrow any funds you may have repaid ahead of schedule – although conditions and fees often apply. Not all car loans come with a redraw facility.

What is a loan-to-value ratio?

The loan-to-value ratio, or LVR, is a percentage that expresses the amount of money owed on the car compared to the value of the car. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have a loan-to-value ratio of 75 per cent. Loan-to-value ratios change over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, although there would still be a $5,000 difference between the size of the outstanding loan and the value of the car, the loan-to-value ratio would now be 67 per cent.

What is a pre-approval?

A pre-approval is a formal document that indicates how much a lender is willing to lend to a consumer – once that person has found the car they want to buy. A lender will assess a borrower’s credit history and financial circumstances before issuing a pre-approval. However, lenders are under no obligation to follow through on pre-approvals, so pre-approvals should be seen as statements of intent rather than rock-solid guarantees.

What is compulsory third-party insurance?

Compulsory third-party insurance, also known as CTP insurance or a green slip, is compulsory if you want to register a vehicle in Australia. If you’re responsible for a car accident, your compulsory third-party insurance will be used to pay any compensation due to anyone who might be injured or killed. However, compulsory third-party insurance doesn’t cover you for vehicle damage or theft.

What is a finance lease?

A finance lease, also known as an asset lease or car lease, is an arrangement by which a finance company buys a car on your behalf. You get to borrow the car in return for making regular payments to the financier. At the end of the lease, you can either buy the car or hand it back. 

What is a chattel mortgage?

A chattel mortgage is a mortgage on a movable item. In the case of a car loan, the chattel is the vehicle. The lender maintains a mortgage over the chattel/vehicle until the loan is fully repaid.

What is a CHP?

A CHP, or commercial hire purchase, is an arrangement by which a finance company buys a car on your behalf. You get to borrow the car in return for making regular payments to the financier. Once the final payment is made, you take ownership of the car. 

What is equity?

The equity is the share of the car that you own. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have $5,000 of equity in the vehicle, or 25 per cent. (The lender has the other 75 per cent.) Equity changes over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, you would still have $5,000 of equity in the vehicle, but your share would be 33 per cent.

What is the principal?

The principal is the value of the loan that is still outstanding. So if a borrower takes out a $20,000 loan, the principal is $20,000. If the borrower repays $5,000 in the first year, the principal is now $15,000.