New buy-now-pay-later service bundll targets everyday spending

New buy-now-pay-later service bundll targets everyday spending

ASX-listed financial services provider Flexigroup has launched a new buy-now-pay-later (BNPL) service bundll, which targets an area not yet covered by the big players: everyday spending.

For customers, there is no minimum spend to use the service, which can facilitate multiple payments up to $1000. The lower payment bracket encompasses smaller expenses, including coffee, groceries, petrol and dinners.

Weekly expenses are “bundled” into one debt and customers have two weeks to pay it off, but they have the option to pay a flat fee of $5 to delay or ‘snooze” their repayments further.

While customers using BNPL companies are usually limited to the retailers that have signed up as a partner, bundll removes this limitation as transactions are processed through the Mastercard network.

This means unlike traditional BNPL businesses like Afterpay, which makes most of its money from charging retailers to be on its platform, bundll can be used with any retailer, online or in-store, that accepts MasterCard.

Under this arrangement, retailers don’t need to pay to offer bundll as a payment option.

Flexigroup’s chief executive officer Rebecca James said the business is focusing on spending that’s usually paid with debit cards.

“We know that our millennial customers prefer debit to credit, like to budget and don’t want to pay interest. While under-35s represent only 23 per cent of credit card holders, they speak for over 48 per cent of buy-now-pay-later users,” she said.

“Furthermore, debit cards surpassed credit cards as a preferred payment method for under-35s during 2019.”

Expanding market

Flexigroup already operates BNPL provider humm, which competes with AfterPay and Zip.

Eyeing potential down under, Swedish BNPL company Klarna launched in the Australian market recently. The service allows buyers to manage their online shopping, deliveries and returns in one place.

The new market entrant is backed by the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, which tripled its stake in Klarna to 5.5 per cent.

The investment may be seen as a smart move, with BNPL users surging from 1.38 million to nearly two million in the 12 months to September 2019, Roy Morgan research indicates.

But despite this strong growth, about 9 per cent of Australians are using BNPL services, which Roy Morgan notes is “still relatively low”.

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Learn more about credit cards

How do credit cards work?

Think of credit cards as a short-term loan where you use the bank’s money to buy something up front and then pay for it later. Unlike a debit card which uses your own money to pay, a credit card essentially borrows the bank’s money to fund the purchase. When you apply for a credit card, the bank assesses your income and assigns you a credit limit based on what you can afford to pay back. At the end of each billing cycle, which is usually monthly, the bank will send you a statement showing the minimum amount you have to pay back, including any interest payable on the balance.

What is a credit card?

A credit card is a payment method which lets you pay for goods and services without using your own money. It’s essentially a short-term loan which lets you borrow the bank’s money to pay for things which you can pay back – potentially with interest – at a later date. Credit cards can also be used to withdraw money from an ATM, which is known as a cash advance. Because you’re borrowing money from a bank, credit cards charge you interest on the money you use (unless you repay the entire debt during the interest-free period). When you apply for a credit card, the bank gives you a credit limit which sets the maximum amount you can borrow using your card. Credit cards are one of the most popular methods of payments and can be a convenient way of paying for goods and services in store, online and all around the globe.

How to pay a credit card

There are a few ways to pay a credit card bill. These include:

  • BPAY - allows you to safely make credit card payments online.
  • Direct debits - set up an automatic payment from your bank account to pay your credit card bill each month. You can choose how much you want to pay of your credit card bill when you set up the auto payments.
  • In a branch.
  • Via your credit card provider's app.

How do you use a credit card?

Credit cards are a quick and convenient way to pay for items in store, online or over the phone. You can use a credit card as a cashless way to pay for goods or services, both locally and overseas. You can also use a credit card to make a cash advance, which gives you the flexibility to withdraw cash from your credit card account. Because a credit card uses the bank’s funds instead of your own, you will be charged interest on the money you spend – unless you pay off the entire debt within the interest-free period. If you pay the minimum monthly repayment, you will be charged interest. There are many different credit card options on the market, all offering different interest rates and reward options.

How do you pay off credit cards?

The best way to pay off a credit card bill is to set a realistic spending budget and stick to it. Each month, you’ll get a credit card statement detailing how much you owe and how long it will take to pay off the balance by making minimum repayments. If you only make the minimum repayments, it will take you years to pay off your outstanding balance and add extra costs in interest charges. To avoid any extra charges, you should pay the entire bill. 

How to pay a credit card from another bank

Paying or transferring debt from one lender to the other is called a balance transfer. This involves transferring part or all of the debt from a credit card with one lender to a credit card with another. As part of the process, your new lender will pay out the old lender, so that you now owe the same amount of money but to a new institution.

Many credit card providers offer an interest-free period on balance transfers to help new applicants better handle their debt. During this period, cardholders are not required to pay interest on the debt they brought over from the other card. This can be a great opportunity for consumers to pay off credit card debt with no interest. There are often fees associated with balance transfers; normally, these are a percentage of the amount transferred.

So make sure you read the terms and conditions of the card before transferring any debt across.

How do you use credit cards?

A credit card can be an easy way to make purchases online, in person or over the phone. When used properly, a credit card can even help you manage your cash flow. But before applying for a credit card, it’s good to know how they work. A credit card is essentially a personal line of credit which lets you buy things and pay for them later. As a card holder, you’ll be given a credit limit and (potentially) charged interest on the money the bank lends you. At the end of each billing period, the bank will send you a statement which shows your outstanding balance and the minimum amount you need to pay back. If you don’t pay back the full balance amount, the bank will begin charging you interest.

How is credit card interest charged?

Your credit card will be charged interest when you don’t pay off the balance on your credit card. Your card provider or bank charges you the individual interest rate that is associated with your card, which is usually between 10 and 20 per cent. 

The interest will be added onto your bill each month or billing period if you don’t pay off the balance, unless you are in an interest-free period.

You will be charged interest on anything that hasn’t been paid for inside the interest-free period. Usually you will receive a notice on your bill or statement saying you will be charged interest so you have some form of notice before you’re charged.

What is a balance transfer credit card?

A balance transfer credit card lets you transfer your debt balance from one credit card to another. A balance transfer credit card generally has a 0 per cent interest rate for a set period of time. When you roll your debt balance over to a new credit card, you’ll be able to take advantage of the interest-free period to pay your credit card debt off faster without accruing additional interest charges. If your application is approved, the provider will pay out your old credit card and transfer your debt balance over to the new card. 

How to apply for an HSBC credit card instalment plan?

HSBC provides a host of different features and benefits to its customers, including interest-free finance options for purchases made at select retailers.

Using this feature, you can make a purchase in-store or online through your credit card, and spread your repayments for up to 60 months. Opting for a credit card instalment plan may be an ideal option as you can make big purchases without worrying about making immediate payments. 

The interest-free instalment plan is valid for all HSBC credit cards, so you shouldn't need to fill out separate forms or apply for a particular plan. Rather, all you should need to do is use your HSBC credit card at any of the participating retailers and inform the vendor that you want to pay using HSBC interest-free. 

As HSBC has partnered with over 1,000 retailers for its interest-free credit card instalment plan, you get the flexibility to purchase a host of different products. Some of the popular retailers that HSBC allows instalments for are: 

  • Webjet 
  • King Furniture 
  • Betta Home Living
  • Stratco 
  • Video Pro 
  • Bing Lee

Once you have provided approval to the vendor, HSBC will send you an SMS asking you to confirm the purchase, following which the payment will go through, and you can select your preferred instalment plan. 

While you may be inclined to choose the most prolonged duration for repayment considering there are no interest charges, it’s important to know that minimum monthly repayments will still apply (3%, or $30, whichever is higher), making it important to choose the right HSBC credit card instalment plan that suits your requirements. 

Does ING increase credit card limits?

You may want to increase your credit card limit for many reasons, such as having access to more spending money. However, if you are using the Orange One credit card issued by ING, you may not be able to do so. 

ING customers can choose a credit limit of their preference when applying for the Orange One credit card. Depending on your financial situation, this limit can be anywhere between $1,000 and $30,000. If you qualify for a Rewards Platinum card, the minimum credit card limit will likely be $6,000. 

Ideally, you should set your credit card limit knowing how much you can afford to repay each month and keep your expenses lower than this level. With most credit cards, you should have the option of requesting a credit card limit increase at a later time, although you will need to qualify for any increase. With an ING credit card, limit increases are out of the question (at the time this was published), which means you may want to apply for a higher credit card limit from the beginning. Remember that you have the option of decreasing your ING credit card limit at a later time.

How does the Commonwealth Bank credit card instalment plan work?

Commonwealth Bank credit card instalment plans allow you to structure the schedule for repaying your outstanding credit card balances. So, rather than pay the entire amount on the due date, you’ll pay a fixed amount on every due date for a particular period.

You can choose from three types of plans. The first is to pay-off a one-time large purchase exceeding $100 made during the previous 14 days. The second plan is to pay off the credit card balance (excluding cash advance, balance transfers, and existing instalment plans) of $600 or more in whole or part over a predetermined period. The last plan allows you to pay off the cash advance balance of $600 or higher in part or fully, over a certain period.

You can break down large purchases into affordable instalments over some time that you specify. Additionally, you enjoy the flexibility to cancel or prepay the plan before its last instalment. You can simultaneously have ten active plans without additional credit checks on all eligible cards.

Once you select the eligible purchase or balance and the desired repayment term, the monthly instalment and due date are shown in the next statement, which includes the new payment and the summary of the plan’s progress. In case you miss a payment, the plan isn’t cancelled, but an unpaid instalment is re-transferred to the applicable balance, and you’ll be charged the standard rate. The plan can be revoked at any time, and the outstanding amount is added to the cash advance or purchase balance as applicable.

Can we pay stamp duty by credit card?

Different states also have different rules about whether you can pay stamp duty with a credit card. Check the payment options for stamp duty on your local state revenue office website.

Some allow payments only from a savings or chequing account, whereas others allow payment through BPAY using your credit card. Also read the fine print to see if BPAY payments on your credit card are considered cash advances, as this could attract a higher interest rate.

How to calculate credit card interest

Credit card interest can quickly turn a manageable balance into unmovable debt. So being able to understand how interest rates translate into dollars is an important skill to acquire.

The common mistake people make is focusing on the credit card’s annual percentage rate (APR), which often sits between 15 and 20 per cent. While the APR does provide a rough idea of how much interest you’ll pay, it’s not entirely accurate.

This is because you actually accrue interest on your balance daily, not annually. So, you need to work out your daily periodic rate (DPR). To do this, divide your card’s APR by the number of days in a year (e.g. 16.9 per cent divided by 365, or 0.05 per cent). You can then apply this figure to the daily balance on your credit card.