Three ways green car loans could save you money

Three ways green car loans could save you money

When you’re in the market for a new car, there are plenty of deciding factors that generally come into play during your search. Maybe you’re looking for a family-friendly car to taxi the kids around. Or it might be a compact city runaround that you’re after. Regardless of the specifics, one thing that many are thinking about when shopping for a car is whether it is eco-friendly.

Buying an eco-friendly, or ‘green’, car is not only an environmentally responsible decision, it could also potentially be a financially responsible decision in more ways than just day-to-day running costs.

Something that may surprise some is that green cars aren’t only cars that are either electric or hybrid vehicles. They can also be new cars that are deemed to be considerably more fuel efficient than a comparable make and model. This includes a selection of cars that may be sold at a much more accessible price point than that of electric and hybrid options. You can compare the green performance of specific cars by visiting Green Vehicle Guide.

Dependant on where in the country you’re located, buying a green car could also unlock some government incentives that might save you a bit of money. Some green car drivers may be eligible for discounts on registration fees and even stamp duty.

Whichever green car it is that takes your interest, it’s worth noting that if you plan to buy it on finance, you could be able to access car loans specifically tailored to eco-friendly vehicles.

Here are three ways green car loans could save you money. 

1. Discounted interest rates

Some banks and lenders may offer green car loan options that have lower interest rates than regular car loans. Paying a reduced interest rate could potentially save you money over the life of the loan.

2. Waived fees and charges

The number of fees and charges that may be associated with some finance options can sometimes really add up. Select green car loans, however, will waive some of these, with certain lenders offering incentives such as no monthly fees and free redraw.

3. Offset carbon emissions

Select lenders may offset your car’s carbon emissions for the length of your loan. This is an important step in the right direction in terms of reducing your overall carbon footprint. Having this built into your car loan means you don’t have to worry about the cost of offsetting your car yourself, while doing the right thing for the environment.

RateCity makes it easy for you to compare car loans specific to your needs.

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Learn more about car loans

How much is your car worth?

If you already own a car, you could potentially bring down the cost by selling your car in the process. Before that happens, though, you’ll need to find out how much your car is worth.

One of the first places to find this value is to research the value of your current car, giving you an idea of roughly how much it’s worth in its peak condition.

There are plenty of websites that offer a free online valuation, allowing you to enter your car’s make, model, year, badge and description, with results listing a price guide based on both selling your car privately and through a dealership.

Of course, dealerships will try to profit on your trade-in by buying it for less than they can sell it, making it highly unlikely that you’ll get the same price selling a car to a dealer as you would selling a car privately.

However, private car sales can be costly and can take months to sell, making car trading more convenient with a guaranteed return, even if you may not be able to realise the total value of your car’s worth.

Remember that everything is negotiable. If the dealership is offering you less for your trade than you wanted, try to negotiate elsewhere to gain that money back. Start by negotiating on the price of the trade and then ask them if they can give you a further discount on your new car.

What is salary packaging?

Salary packaging is an arrangement you can make with your employer that can allow you to buy a car from your pre-tax salary. The advantage of salary packaging is that it will redue your taxable income.

Can I get a car loan if I am on disability benefit?

Yes, there are some lenders who will consider your application if you are on a disability pension. As long as you have an income, usually of over $400 a week, there are lenders that are willing to supply you with a loan.

There are also micro-financing charitable organisations that provide low interest loans for people on low incomes for certain necessary amenities, such as cars, if they match the specified criteria.

What is collateral?

Collateral, or security, is an asset you agree to surrender to a lender if you fail to repay a loan. Generally, the collateral for a car loan is the car itself. So if you fail to repay the loan, the lender might seize your car, sell it and then use the proceeds to recover their debt.

What is a green slip?

A green slip, also known as compulsory third-party insurance or CTP insurance, is compulsory if you want to register a vehicle in Australia. If you’re responsible for a car accident, your green slip will be used to pay any compensation due to anyone who might be injured or killed. However, a green slip doesn’t cover you for vehicle damage or theft.

What is the principal?

The principal is the value of the loan that is still outstanding. So if a borrower takes out a $20,000 loan, the principal is $20,000. If the borrower repays $5,000 in the first year, the principal is now $15,000.

Can I get a loan if I am on aged pension?

Yes, there are certain lenders that provide loans for people on aged pensions. Your viability for a loan will be assessed by a lender by your credit report and your income. They will also take into account any assets you have that you may want to secure the loan with. The better your credit score, the more likely you are to be accepted for a loan, and the lower the interest you will have to pay on that loan.  

If you have a bad credit rating and are on an aged pension however, don’t despair, because there are specialised lenders who still may be willing to provide you with a loan.

What is an LVR?

The LVR, or loan-to-value ratio, is a percentage that expresses the amount of money owed on the car compared to the value of the car. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have an LVR of 75 per cent. LVRs change over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, although there would still be a $5,000 difference between the size of the outstanding loan and the value of the car, the LVR would now be 67 per cent.

What is a dealership?

A dealership is a car yard or a place where cars are sold.

What is dealer finance?

Dealer finance is a car loan organised through a car dealer – as opposed to car loans organised by a finance broker or directly by the lender.

What is a redraw facility?

A redraw facility allows you to re-borrow any funds you may have repaid ahead of schedule – although conditions and fees often apply. Not all car loans come with a redraw facility.

Can you get a car loan as a single mum?

Getting a car loan can be tricky if you’re a single mum, but it’s not impossible. Juggling your finances can be difficult, particularly if you are reliant on a sole income or on Centrelink payments (or a combination of the two), and having a car is a necessity rather than a luxury for many who have to look after children. Luckily there are specialist providers and services that can help you get the loan you’re after, even if you’re in a tough spot financially.

What is trade-in value?

The trade-in value is the price you could realistically charge if you were to sell your car to a dealer while buying a replacement vehicle. Generally, a car’s trade-in value is less than its market value. That’s because the dealer has no interest in buying your car unless it can make a profit – which can only be done if the dealer has room to increase the price.

What is repayment frequency?

Repayment frequency is how regularly you have to make car loan repayments to your lender. The most common repayment frequency is monthly, but many lenders will also give you the option of making fortnightly or weekly repayments.