Confident Aussies keen to buy cars

Confident Aussies keen to buy cars

There’s been an increase in the number of Australians who intend to buy a vehicle in the next four years, with the number rising to 2.38 million.

The latest Roy Morgan Single survey of over 50,000 consumers found that in the three months leading to November 2017, the number rose by 142,000 people looking to buy a new vehicle.

The survey also found that those looking to buy a new car are more confident than the population average. “Over the November quarter, the consumer confidence for all Australians was 114.1, whereas those intending to purchase a new vehicle in the next four years had a much higher level with 122.8.”

New vehicle purchase intention: November 2017

istock_79305201_small5

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source

Intentions to buy a vehicle in the next 12 months have also risen by 13,000 (2.2 per cent) over the same period last year, to 615,000. This segment also had higher than average consumer confidence than the general population. 

Over 50s are most interested in buying new vehicles

Roy Morgan also found that those 50 and over had the strongest growth with new vehicle purchase intent in the next four years. Those aged 65 or over had the highest growth rate, increasing by almost 250 per cent to 420,000. This was followed by the 50-64 age group, who saw intent rise 36 per cent.

Those under 35 all saw a decrease in new vehicle purchase intent in the next four years, with the strongest decrease coming from those aged 14-24 (falling 29 per cent).

According to Roy Morgan, these age groups are “demonstrating less interest in purchasing new motor vehicles but they remain the highest intenders for used vehicles.”

New vehicle purchase intenders in next 4 years by age

istock_79305201_small5

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source

Norman Morris, Industry Communications Director, Roy Morgan said that over the last decade or more, there has been “considerable growth in the new vehicle market generated in part by higher confidence among buyers and reflected in recent record sales and buying intentions.”

“The increase in the trend for new vehicle purchasing intentions that we have seen over the last 15 years has come mainly from the over 50s age group and in particular those over 65.

“The under 35 age groups on the other hand have shown a long term decline in new vehicle buying intention levels. This is likely due to a number of factors including competing priorities in areas such as travel, dining out, housing costs etc. and income related factors caused by unemployment and longer time spent in higher education. This group has not lost interest in motor vehicles as shown by their very high intention levels to purchase a used vehicle.

“With the speed of change taking place in this industry currently, particularly in areas such as electric cars, it is important to track consumers’ likely interest in these potential fuel changes.

Currently, 37% of the population say that they would seriously consider purchasing an electric vehicle, up from 29% just one year ago. This is now not far below the level of interest in diesel with 45% and well ahead of LPG on 21%, both of which are showing downward trends.

“The changes in technology such as driverless cars and fuel preferences have the potential to impact rapidly on vehicle purchasing intentions as they can be regarded as major disrupters,” said Mr Morris.

Did you find this helpful? Why not share this news?

Fact Checked -

This article was reviewed by Property & Personal Finance Writer Nick Bendel before it was published as part of RateCity's Fact Check process.

Advertisement

RateCity
ratecity-newsletter

Money Health Newsletter

Subscribe for news, tips and expert opinions to help you make smarter financial decisions

By signing up, you agree to the RateCity Privacy Policy, Terms of Use and Disclaimer.

Advertisement

Learn more about car loans

Can you get a chattel mortgage with bad credit?

Getting approval for a chattel mortgage with bad credit may be possible, given ‘chattel’ (usually a piece of equipment or car) is put up as security for the loan. That means if you fail to repay the loan, the creditor can recover the loaned amount by repossessing and selling the car or piece of equipment. This differs from unsecured car loans, where the asset is not tied to the loan and cannot be taken if you don’t meet the repayments. 

How to get a chattel mortgage?

Both businesses and individuals may use a chattel mortgage, provided that the car is being used predominantly for business purposes. 

To apply for a chattel mortgage, you need to first consider your options and choose a suitable lender that meets your requirements. Once you have selected a lender, you can apply for the loan online by filling out a form. If the lender doesn’t offer an online application process, you can either call them or visit their nearest branch. 

After you’ve applied, the lender will ask you to supply documents that confirm your identification, income, job profile, etc. If everything is in order, most lenders will arrange the loan’s settlement, so all you need to do is pick up your car!

What is vehicle finance?

Vehicle finance, also known as a car loan, is money that a consumer borrows with the express purpose of buying a vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, van, truck or campervan. Vehicle finance can be used for both new and used vehicles.

What is equity?

The equity is the share of the car that you own. For example, if you take out a $15,000 loan to buy a $20,000 car, you have $5,000 of equity in the vehicle, or 25 per cent. (The lender has the other 75 per cent.) Equity changes over time as you pay off your loan and your car depreciates in value. For example, two years later you might now owe $10,000 on your car, which might now be worth $15,000. In that case, you would still have $5,000 of equity in the vehicle, but your share would be 33 per cent.

What is a car loan?

A car loan, also known as vehicle finance, is money that a consumer borrows with the express purpose of buying a vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, van, truck or campervan. Car loans can be used for both new and used vehicles.

What is depreciation?

Depreciation is the reduction in the value of your car. Almost every car loses value each year, although at different rates. As a guide, cars depreciate on average by 14 per cent per year in the first three years and then eight per cent per year after that.

What is an interest rate?

The interest rate is the price you have to pay for borrowing money. The interest rate is expressed as an annual percentage of however much of the loan remains to be paid. For example, if you took out a $10,000 car loan with an interest rate of 8.75 per cent, you would be charged 8.75 per cent of $10,000, or $875 of interest per year. But if you then reduced the outstanding loan to $9,000, your annual interest bill would be 8.75 per cent of $9,000, or $787.50.

Can an individual apply for a chattel mortgage?

Lenders offer chattel mortgages as a way to finance vehicles used for business purposes. Companies, as well as individuals, are eligible to apply for and receive chattel mortgages. The essential eligibility requirement is that the vehicle is used for business at least 51 per cent of the time. If you’re a tradesman and require a new utility vehicle to move equipment, you can apply for a chattel mortgage to finance the purchase.

A chattel mortgage for individuals is an option if you’re self-employed and have an Australian Business Number (ABN). You’ll also need to be registered for the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and have a clear credit history. Like all other loan types, you’ll have to prove your capability to service the loan to qualify for a chattel mortgage.

You’ll retain the ownership while the lender holds the vehicle as security for the loan in a similar way as they would a property with a home loan. You repay the borrowed amount in predetermined monthly instalments. Once you repay the entire loan amount, the lender will remove the mortgage.

What are the chattel mortgage tax benefits?

Buying a vehicle with a chattel mortgage can help to reduce your tax burden. The tax benefits you can get from a chattel mortgage include:

  • Goods and Services Tax (GST): GST is paid when you buy a new vehicle. You can claim the GST credit for vehicles and other goods or services used for commercial use. The GST paid when you buy the car is claimed as an Input Tax Credit if your business is registered for the GST in your Bank Activity Statement (BAS).
  • Interest payments: You can claim the interest paid on your chattel mortgage as a deduction in your annual tax returns.
  • Depreciation: The longer you own the vehicle, its value will depreciate, and you can claim this depreciation as a tax deduction.

You should consult an experienced tax professional for more information about chattel mortgage tax benefits.

What is stamp duty?

Stamp duty, or motor vehicle duty, is a tax you pay when you transfer a car into your name. Stamp duty applies to both new and used cars. Stamp duty is a state tax, so rates and conditions vary from state to state: New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania, ACT and Northern Territory.

Should I service my own car?

There are also costs associated with vehicle ownership, such as paying for petrol and the obligatory ongoing maintenance. But should you cut down on costs by servicing your own vehicle?

If you’re considering getting out the tool box, spanner, and grease-laden towel, you need to carefully weigh up the risks and benefits. A trained mechanic will need to complete certain tasks, while you may be perfectly capable to handle other aspects yourself.

If you’re short on time, it may be worth paying for the convenience of a full vehicle service. However if you’re trying to slash your expenses, there are some basic maintenance tasks that you can complete yourself.

You should call a mechanic if you’re unsure about a vehicle maintenance task you’re about to take on. However there are a number of maintenance tasks that you may be able to complete with your own two hands including:

  • Replacing your car battery
  • Changing the oil
  • Replacing worn windscreen wipers
  • Replacing blown fuses

Remember to keep your car’s body in good condition, by washing and applying a protective wax on a regular basis, too.

Always check your car warranty agreement as some new car purchases come with an extended car warranty provided your services are conducted at the vehicle service centre where you purchased the car. In these circumstances, you may find the service fee is capped, alleviating some of the maintenance woes.

Does my insurance cover other cars I drive?

If you’re driving someone else’s car, say your friend’s, and you’re involved in an accident, whose insurance is responsible, yours or your friend’s? Does car insurance cover driving other people’s cars?

The short answer is yes. A few car insurance providers offer insurance cover for people to drive someone else’s car. It’s always better to double-check this before you get behind the wheel.

If you’re not covered, you can opt for non-owner car insurance which lets you drive someone else’s car and be protected against liability. However, you will not benefit from other coverage such as damage to the vehicle, replacement rental or medical expenses.

Getting comprehensive insurance driving other cars can be done with temporary insurance. It’s recommended that you do this if you plan to drive someone else’s car, even for a short duration. You can choose between policies that cover you for a fortnight, a month or even a pay-as-you-drive option with temporary insurance.

Alternatively, you can ask the car’s owner to check with their insurer if you can be added to the policy. This will ensure that you are covered fully with comprehensive car insurance driving other cars. Do note that adding you could increase the annual premium for the owner.

Who can be a guarantor on a car loan?

While a guarantor for a car loan is often a parent or relative, to be accepted as a guarantor, that third party must be someone with very good or excellent credit. They may have to put an asset of theirs against the loan as collateral, such as their car or home equity.

It’s important for both parties to really consider the risks involved before signing the dotted line of a guarantor car loan, including:

  • What is your financial situation like?
  • How secure is your current income?
  • Are you likely to default on the loan?
  • How much will the guarantor be required to repay if you default?
  • How will this repayment impact the guarantor’s ability to service their existing financial commitments?
  • Will your relationship be affected if the situation sours?

Ensuring you can answer these questions will help you and your potential guarantor decide whether a guarantor car loan is right for you.

Where can I get a student car loan?

Student car loans are not a necessarily a product in and of themselves, but what you may be looking for is a guarantor car loan.

A guarantor car loan has a third-party act as a form of guarantee for your loan application, telling the bank or lender that if you default on your loan, someone will pay the loan repayments.

Going guarantor on a car loan is no new thing, and before internet-based credit scores, guarantor car loan applicants would apply for loans with a guarantor or property owner who could vouch for the person borrowing the loan.

To get a guarantor car loan, you’ll need someone willing to act as a guarantor for your car loan.