How much will a hybrid car set you back?

How much will a hybrid car set you back?

Of the shrinking number of Australians planning to buy a new car over the next few years, an increasing percentage reckon their next car will be a hybrid. But how much do hybrid vehicles cost compared to petrol-fuelled models?

According to the Roy Morgan Automotive Currency Report, March 2019, 476,000 Australians intend to purchase a new vehicle in the next 12 months, compared to 612,000 last year and the long term average of 611,000.

These findings are similar to recent stats from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI), which found that car sales have declined by 8% over the first four months of 2019, with 320 fewer car sales per day in April 2019 than there were in April 2018.

However, Roy Morgan also found that Australians intending to buy new cars are showing an increasing interest in vehicles with hybrid (petrol + electric) engines – 10.1% compared to 5.6% a year ago. All other fuel types saw declining preferences compared to the year before with the most popular (petrol) dropping from 63% preferred to 60% preferred.

Roy Morgan communications director, Norman Morris, attributed declining car purchase intentions to a range of factors, including concern about the slowing economy, lack of wage growth, energy price escalation and declining home values.

“In addition to these potential economic constraints on new vehicle demand, the rapidly changing technologies with the resultant fuel choice decisions adds to the complexity of decision making in this market.”

“This research has highlighted the need to understand the generational differences in likely fuel choice as the market changes. For example the early adopters of changing vehicle fuels are most likely to be millennials as they appear to be more likely to move away from the traditional petrol engine cars.”

So how much will a hybrid car set you back? To give you a general guideline,  here’s how much a hybrid Toyota RAV4, Mitsubishi Outlander, and Hyundai IONIQ could cost you from month to month and in total, based on starting prices from carsguide.com.au, and assuming a five-year car loan with an interest rate of 9.43% (the market average based on RateCity data at the end of April 2019):

Vehicle Starting price Monthly car loan repayment Total interest paid Total amount to pay
2019 Toyota RAV4 GX 2WD HYBRID $34,140 $716 $8810 $42,950
2019 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (HYBRID) ES $45,990 $964 $11,868 $57,858
2019 Hyundai IONIQ HYBRID ELITE $33,990 $713 $8771 $42,761

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Learn more about car loans

How much can I get towards a new car as a single parent?

It really depends on your financial circumstances as to how much a lender will grant you towards a new car as a single parent. With most lenders, the smaller the loan you apply for, the higher your chances are of approval, so getting a cheaper car or adding some savings of your own, may be a valid option if you are struggling for approval on a car loan.

How much is your car worth?

If you already own a car, you could potentially bring down the cost by selling your car in the process. Before that happens, though, you’ll need to find out how much your car is worth.

One of the first places to find this value is to research the value of your current car, giving you an idea of roughly how much it’s worth in its peak condition.

There are plenty of websites that offer a free online valuation, allowing you to enter your car’s make, model, year, badge and description, with results listing a price guide based on both selling your car privately and through a dealership.

Of course, dealerships will try to profit on your trade-in by buying it for less than they can sell it, making it highly unlikely that you’ll get the same price selling a car to a dealer as you would selling a car privately.

However, private car sales can be costly and can take months to sell, making car trading more convenient with a guaranteed return, even if you may not be able to realise the total value of your car’s worth.

Remember that everything is negotiable. If the dealership is offering you less for your trade than you wanted, try to negotiate elsewhere to gain that money back. Start by negotiating on the price of the trade and then ask them if they can give you a further discount on your new car.

What is CTP insurance?

CTP insurance, also known as compulsory third-party insurance or a green slip, is compulsory if you want to register a vehicle in Australia. If you’re responsible for a car accident, your CTP insurance will be used to pay any compensation due to anyone who might be injured or killed. However, CTP insurance doesn’t cover you for vehicle damage or theft.

Can I get car finance on a pension?

 

Yes, as long as you meet basic criteria set out by lenders you are eligible for car finance. Your interest rate will be determined based on your financial history which can be found in your credit report, your income and any property you may own.

Comparing car loans for pensioners before you settle on one is important though, if you want to secure the best possible loan for your circumstances.

What is repayment frequency?

Repayment frequency is how regularly you have to make car loan repayments to your lender. The most common repayment frequency is monthly, but many lenders will also give you the option of making fortnightly or weekly repayments.

What is the principal?

The principal is the value of the loan that is still outstanding. So if a borrower takes out a $20,000 loan, the principal is $20,000. If the borrower repays $5,000 in the first year, the principal is now $15,000.

What is borrowing capacity?

Borrowing capacity is the amount of money that a consumer is able to borrow from a lender. Each consumer’s circumstances are unique, so different people will have different borrowing capacities. Lenders use their own in-house formulas to calculate borrowing capacity, so the same consumer might have different borrowing capacities at different lenders.

What are the pros and cons of guarantor car loans?

Like all things, there are positives and negatives to guarantor car loans, though one may outweigh the other depending on your needs.

Guarantor car loan pros may include that you’re more likely to be approved for a long if you have no credit or a history with bad credit, that you’re more likely to secure a car loan with a lower interest rate, and that because your guarantor car loan is based on a relationship, you will be more inclined to meet your repayment schedule.

However, there are negatives, as well. Guarantor car loan cons may include leaving a detrimental mark on a personal relationship with added strain if you don’t meet your repayments, and you may take out a loan that you can’t actually afford.

Weighing these pros and cons will give you a greater understanding of whether a guarantor loan is ideal for your circumstances.

What is an interest rate?

The interest rate is the price you have to pay for borrowing money. The interest rate is expressed as an annual percentage of however much of the loan remains to be paid. For example, if you took out a $10,000 car loan with an interest rate of 8.75 per cent, you would be charged 8.75 per cent of $10,000, or $875 of interest per year. But if you then reduced the outstanding loan to $9,000, your annual interest bill would be 8.75 per cent of $9,000, or $787.50.

What is proof of income?

Before giving you a car loan, lenders will ask for proof of income – documentary evidence that you earn as much as you claim you earn. Lenders will typically want some combination of tax returns, pay slips and bank statements. The reason lenders want proof of income is because they want to be sure you have the means to repay the car loan.

What is a balloon payment?

Some lenders will offer borrowers reduced monthly repayments in return for a one-off lump sum – or balloon payment – that the borrower has to pay at the end of the loan. Generally, the total repayments on a loan with a balloon structure will be higher than a loan without.

What is a CHP?

A CHP, or commercial hire purchase, is an arrangement by which a finance company buys a car on your behalf. You get to borrow the car in return for making regular payments to the financier. Once the final payment is made, you take ownership of the car. 

What is a finance lease?

A finance lease, also known as an asset lease or car lease, is an arrangement by which a finance company buys a car on your behalf. You get to borrow the car in return for making regular payments to the financier. At the end of the lease, you can either buy the car or hand it back. 

What is a fixed-rate loan?

A fixed-rate loan is one where the interest rate remains constant for an agreed amount of time. For example, if you take out a five-year fixed-rate loan at 8.75 per cent, the lender is obliged to leave your interest rate at 8.75 per cent for at least five years. By contrast, if you take out a variable-rate loan at 8.75 per cent, the lender can change the interest rate whenever it wants.