Compare popular home loans

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Advertised Rate

2.55%

Fixed - 1 year

Comparison Rate*

3.21%

Company
Adelaide Bank
Repayment

$638

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 79.9999%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

2.67

/ 5
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Advertised Rate

2.84%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

2.46%

Company
Athena Home Loans
Repayment

$710

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

1.96

/ 5
Go to site
More details
Advertised Rate

3.39%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

3.59%

Company
Pepper
Repayment

$1,484

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 85%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

2.03

/ 5
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More details
Advertised Rate

2.55%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

2.60%

Company
CUA
Repayment

$1,353

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

3.10

/ 5
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More details
Product
Advertised Rate

2.79%

Fixed - 3 years

Comparison Rate*

4.46%

Company
CUA
Repayment

$698

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

1.71

/ 5
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More details
Advertised Rate

2.84%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

2.68%

Company
Athena Home Loans
Repayment

$710

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

1.96

/ 5
Go to site
More details
Advertised Rate

3.29%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

3.71%

Company
NAB
Repayment

$823

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

1.46

/ 5
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More details
Advertised Rate

2.29%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

2.36%

Company
Reduce Home Loans
Repayment

$1,314

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 75%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

3.57

/ 5
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More details
Advertised Rate

2.74%

Variable

Comparison Rate*

2.74%

Company
UBank
Repayment

$1,382

monthly

Features
Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied
Real Time Rating™

2.76

/ 5
Go to site

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Learn more about home loans

Why you need to compare home loans

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Whether you’re a first home buyer or a long-time property investor, one of the first steps you should take before taking out a mortgage is to compare home loans from a range of Australian lenders. 

Buying a home is arguably the most expensive purchase you’ll ever make, so it pays to do your research. This is first and foremost to ensure you choose the most competitive home loan for your financial needs, and don’t end up paying more than you have to

When it comes to home loan comparison, a lot of people fall into the trap of just looking at the interest rate. 

However, there are several components of a home loan that can influence how much you’ll pay, including:

  • The loan amount
  • The interest rate
  • The loan type (fixed rate, variable rate or split rate loan)
  • What type of borrower you are (owner-occupier or investor)
  • The features (redraw facility, extra repayments, offset accounts etc.)
  • The fees (upfront fees, ongoing fees etc. 

You shouldn’t need a law degree to understand the fine print of a home loan and make your choice. This is where home loan comparison rates come in. 

What is a comparison rate?

A comparison rate is a combination of the loan’s interest rate with its fees and other charges, such as ongoing monthly or yearly fees and upfront fees. 

The comparison rate will combine these fees with the interest rate and then create an average rate for the loan, based on a pre-set loan amount and loan term. 

How to compare home loans 

  1. Comparison tables & tools

One of the best ways to compare home loans in Australia is by utilising home loan comparison tools. These include interest rate comparison tables, mortgage repayment calculators, Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI) calculators and stamp duty calculators. 

RateCity.com.au allows you to easily compare home loans through its easy to navigate comparison tables. Search for and compare home loan interest rates from over 100 Australian lenders, and use the filtering system to narrow down your options to find a loan that suits your specific financial needs. 

You can then click on one or more loans and select ‘Compare’ to see how the loan stacks up against the big four banks and/or any other loans you may be interested in. 

  1. Comparison rates

When it comes to mortgage comparison, you shouldn’t only look at the advertised interest rate. Once you’ve narrowed down a selection of home loans thanks to the comparison tools, you can use the comparison rate as a starting-off guide to calculate your potential mortgage repayments with RateCity.com.au’s mortgage repayment calculator, and measure this against your budget. 

This is one of the more effective ways to compare home loan interest rates as comparison rates give you a more realistic interest rate for what your total costs will be, and allows you to budget your expenses and repayments much more effectively. 

For example

Nick wants to borrow $350,000 for a 30-year home loan and he can afford up to $1,600 a month on mortgage repayments. By using the RateCity.com.au comparison tools, he found a home loan with an interest rate of 3.50 per cent. He then used a mortgage repayment calculator and found his monthly repayments will be $1,572.  

As a rule of thumb, you should avoid paying more than 30 per cent of your income on your mortgage, or risk entering into mortgage stress. 

  1. Look at the features and flexibility

The lowest interest rate isn’t necessarily the most important thing to consider when comparing home loans. If you’re desperate for a home loan with features such as an offset account, there’s no point just looking at the comparison rate. You need to choose a loan that actually suits your financial needs and offers those features. 

RateCity.com.au’s comparison tables allow you to easily view a home loan product’s features, so you can compare what is on offer and level of flexibility in the home loan. 

Home Loans 101 

 What are the best home loan comparison rates in Australia? 

There are a range of factors that you need to consider when comparing home loans, and the best home loan for one person may not necessarily be the best for another. 

While there is no one ‘best’ home loan on the market, you can utilise home loan comparison tools, mortgage repayment calculators, as well as home loan guides to make the most educated decision around what is the best home loan for you. 

It is important that you don’t just look at the comparison rate when choosing your home loan. These are the questions you should ask yourself when comparing your home loan options to find the most competitive mortgage for you: 

  • What is the length of the loan?
  • What will my repayments be?
  • Is the rate fixed, variable or split?
  • Can I make additional repayments?
  • What fees have or haven’t been included in my calculations?
  • Will my mortgage repayments be more than 30 per cent of my pre-tax income? 

What home loan features are available? 

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There are a range of helpful home loan features that allow you to have the most flexibility in your mortgage, including:

Home Loan Feature

About

Additional repayments

Allows you to lower your total interest and shortens the length of your loan. Some fees may apply.

Interest only repayments

Allows you to pay only for the interest on your home loan first, to reduce mortgage repayments in the short term. Will prevent you from growing equity or making a dent in your principal repayments.

Introductory rate

Lower rate offered to new customers to entice them into joining. This will revert to a higher interest rate once this introductory period is over.

Line of credit

Lets you access the equity in your current home to use for a holiday, renovations etc.

Lump sum repayments

Your lender will allow you to make ad-hoc bulk repayments towards your mortgage (useful if you get a large tax return, or come into some money). 

Offset account

A transaction account linked to your home loan where the balance of the transaction account is offset against the unpaid balance of your loan, to reduce the amount of interest payable. Can involve higher interest rates.

Mortgage portability

You can transfer your loan from your current home to a different property, sometimes reducing fees (establishment fees etc.)

Redraw facility

Allows you to access extra payments you’ve made towards the mortgage by using the equity in your home as security to borrow money. The more money you put into a redraw facility, the less you’ll pay on your home loan.

Split loan

For when you can’t decide whether to have a fixed or variable home loan – split it 50/50. 


What home loan fees could I be charged
? 

There are a range of fees that lenders may charge that you should consider when comparing home loans, as they will impact your overall mortgage cost. These include:

  1. Application fee/up-front cost
  2. Ongoing fee
  3. Additional repayment fee
  4. Late payment fee
  5. Break costs and exit fees
  6. Mortgage discharge fee
  7. Redraw facility
  8. Re-fix fee
  9. Switching fee
  10. Portability fee
  11. Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI)
  12. Stamp duty 

Home loan comparison calculator  

RateCity.com.au’s home loan comparison calculators can help you to work out which mortgage is best for your financial needs and budget. 

The simple to use mortgage tool allows you to search via comparison rate, view your estimated monthly repayments for that loan, and learn which features the loan does or does not include. 

 

Frequently asked questions

What is a comparison rate?

The comparison rate is a more inclusive way of comparing home loans that factors in not only on the interest rate but also the majority of upfront and ongoing charges that add to the total cost of a home loan.

The rate is calculated using an industry-wide formula based on a $150,000 loan over a 25-year period and includes things like revert rates after an introductory or fixed rate period, application fees and monthly account keeping fees.

In Australia, all lenders are required by law to publish the comparison rate alongside their advertised rate so people can compare products easily.

What is the average annual percentage rate?

Also known as the comparison rate, or sometimes the ‘true rate’ of a loan, the average annual percentage rate (AAPR) is used to indicate the overall cost of a loan after considering all the fees, charges and other factors, such as introductory offers and honeymoon rates.

The AAPR is calculated based on a standardised loan amount and loan term, and doesn’t include any extra non-standard charges.

What's the difference between Real Time Ratings and comparison rates?

A comparison rate calculates the cost of a $150,000 loan over 25 years. While a comparison rate is a good industry benchmark, it doesn’t consider your specific lending requirements.

Real Time RatingsTM factors in essential information like your loan size, your loan-to-value ratio (LVR), whether you want an offset account and whether you are an investor or an owner-occupier.

Remaining loan term

The length of time it will take to pay off your current home loan, based on the currently-entered mortgage balance, monthly repayment and interest rate.

Who has the best home loan?

Determining who has the ‘best’ home loan really does depend on your own personal circumstances and requirements. It may be tempting to judge a loan merely on the interest rate but there can be added value in the extras on offer, such as offset and redraw facilities, that aren’t available with all low rate loans.

To determine which loan is the best for you, think about whether you would prefer the consistency of a fixed loan or the flexibility and potential benefits of a variable loan. Then determine which features will be necessary throughout the life of your loan. Thirdly, consider how much you are willing to pay in fees for the loan you want. Once you find the perfect combination of these three elements you are on your way to determining the best loan for you. 

What happens to my home loan when interest rates rise?

If you are on a variable rate home loan, every so often your rate will be subject to increases and decreases. Rate changes are determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, however often when the RBA changes the cash rate, a number of banks will follow suit, at least to some extent. You can use RateCity cash rate to check how the latest interest rate change affected your mortgage interest rate.

When your rate rises, you will be required to pay your bank more each month in mortgage repayments. Similarly, if your interest rate is cut, then your monthly repayments will decrease. Your lender will notify you of what your new repayments will be, although you can do the calculations yourself, and compare other home loan rates using our mortgage calculator.

There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.

Can I take a personal loan after a home loan?

Are you struggling to pay the deposit for your dream home? A personal loan can help you pay the deposit. The question that may arise in your mind is can I take a home loan after a personal loan, or can you take a personal loan at the same time as a home loan, as it is. The answer is that, yes, provided you can meet the general eligibility criteria for both a personal loan and a home loan, your application should be approved. Those eligibility criteria may include:

  • Higher-income to show repayment capability for both the loans
  • Clear credit history with no delays in bill payments or defaults on debts
  • Zero or minimal current outstanding debt
  • Some amount of savings
  • Proven rent history will be positively perceived by the lenders

A personal loan after or during a home loan may impact serviceability, however, as the numbers can seriously add up. Every loan you avail of increases your monthly installments and the amount you use to repay the personal loan will be considered to lower the money available for the repayment of your home loan.

As to whether you can get a personal loan after your home loan, the answer is a very likely "yes", though it does come with a caveat: as long as you can show sufficient income to repay both the loans on time, you should be able to get that personal loan approved. A personal loan can also help to improve your credit score showing financial discipline and responsibility, which may benefit you with more favorable terms for your home loan.

How do I refinance my home loan?

Refinancing your home loan can involve a bit of paperwork but if you are moving on to a lower rate, it can save you thousands of dollars in the long-run. The first step is finding another loan on the market that you think will save you money over time or offer features that your current loan does not have. Once you have selected a couple of loans you are interested in, compare them with your current loan to see if you will save money in the long term on interest rates and fees. Remember to factor in any break fees and set up fees when assessing the cost of switching.

Once you have decided on a new loan it is simply a matter of contacting your existing and future lender to get the new loan set up. Beware that some lenders will revert your loan back to a 25 or 30 year term when you refinance which may mean initial lower repayments but may cost you more in the long run.

What is a fixed home loan?

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

What is a variable home loan?

A variable rate home loan is one where the interest rate can and will change over the course of your loan. The rate is determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, so while the cash rate might go down, your bank may decide not to follow suit, although they do broadly follow market conditions. One of the upsides of variable rates is that they are typically more flexible than their fixed rate counterparts which means that a lot of these products will let you make extra repayments and offer features such as offset accounts.

How can I calculate interest on my home loan?

You can calculate the total interest you will pay over the life of your loan by using a mortgage calculator. The calculator will estimate your repayments based on the amount you want to borrow, the interest rate, the length of your loan, whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor and whether you plan to pay ‘principal and interest’ or ‘interest-only’.

If you are buying a new home, the calculator will also help you work out how much you’ll need to pay in stamp duty and other related costs.

What is the difference between fixed, variable and split rates?

Fixed rate

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

Variable rate

A variable rate home loan is one where the interest rate can and will change over the course of your loan. The rate is determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, so while the cash rate might go down, your bank may decide not to follow suit, although they do broadly follow market conditions. One of the upsides of variable rates is that they are typically more flexible than their fixed rate counterparts which means that a lot of these products will let you make extra repayments and offer features such as offset accounts.

Split rates home loans

A split loan lets you fix a portion of your loan, and leave the remainder on a variable rate so you get a bet each way on fixed and variable rates. A split loan is a good option for someone who wants the peace of mind that regular repayments can provide but still wants to retain some of the additional features variable loans typically provide such as an offset account. Of course, with most things in life, split loans are still a trade-off. If the variable rate goes down, for example, the lower interest rates will only apply to the section that you didn’t fix.

What are the responsibilities of a mortgage broker?

Mortgage brokers act as the go-between for borrowers looking for a home loan and the lenders offering the loan. They offer personalised advice to help borrowers choose the right home loan for their needs.

In Australia, mortgage brokers are required by law to carry an Australian Credit License (ACL) if they offer credit assistance services. Which is the legal term for guidance regarding the different kinds of credit offered by lenders, including home loan mortgages. They may not need this license if they are working for an aggregator, for instance, as a franchisee. In both these situations, they need to comply with the regulations laid down by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC).

These regulations, which are stipulated by Australian legislation, require mortgage brokers to comply with what are called “responsible lending” and “best interest” obligations. Responsible lending obligations mean brokers have to suggest “suitable” home loans. This means loans that you can easily qualify for,  actually meet your needs, and don’t prove unnecessarily challenging for you.

Starting 1 January 2021, mortgage brokers must comply with best interest obligations in addition to responsible lending obligations. These require mortgage brokers to act in the best interest of their customers and also requires them to prioritise their customers’ interests over their own. For instance, a mortgage broker may not recommend a lender who gives them a commission if that lender’s home loan offer does not benefit that particular customer.

What is an ongoing fee?

Ongoing fees are any regular payments charged by your lender in addition to the interest they apply including annual fees, monthly account keeping fees and offset fees. The average annual fee is close to $200 however there are almost 2,000 home loan products that don’t charge an annual fee at all. There’s plenty of extra costs when you’re buying a home, such as conveyancing, stamp duty, moving costs, so the more fees you can avoid on your home loan, the better. While $200 might not seem like much in the grand scheme of things, it adds up to $6,000 over the life of a 30 year loan – money which would be much better off either reinvested into your home loan or in your back pocket for the next rainy day.

Example: Anna is tossing up between two different mortgage products. Both have the same variable interest rate, but one has a monthly account keeping fee of $20. By picking the loan with no fees, and investing an extra $20 a month into her loan, Josie will end up shaving 6 months off her 30 year loan and saving over $9,000* in interest repayments.

Can I apply for an ANZ non-resident home loan? 

You may be eligible to apply for an ANZ non-resident home loan only if you meet the following two conditions:

  1. You hold a Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa or its predecessor, the Temporary Skilled Work (subclass 457) visa.
  2. Your job is included in the Australian government’s Medium and Long Term Strategic Skills List. 

However, non-resident home loan applications may need Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB) approval in addition to meeting ANZ’s Mortgage Credit Requirements. Also, they may not be eligible for loans that require paying for Lender’s Mortgage Insurance (LMI). As a result, you may not be able to borrow more than 80 per cent of your home’s value. However, you can apply as a co-borrower with your spouse if they are a citizen of either Australia or New Zealand, or are a permanent resident.

Can I get a NAB home loan on casual employment?

While many lenders consider casual employees as high-risk borrowers because of their fluctuating incomes, there are a few specialist lenders, such as NAB, which may provide home loans to individuals employed on a casual basis. A NAB home loan for casual employment is essentially a low doc home loan specifically designed to help casually employed individuals who may be unable to provide standard financial documents. However, since such loans are deemed high risk compared to regular home loans, you could be charged higher rates and receive lower maximum LVRs (Loan to Value Ratio, which is the loan amount you can borrow against the value of the property).

While applying for a home loan as a casual employee, you will likely be asked to demonstrate that you've been working steadily and might need to provide group certificates for the last two years. It is at the lender’s discretion to pick either of the two group certificates and consider that to be your income. If you’ve not had the same job for several years, providing proof of income could be a bit of a challenge for you. In this scenario, some lenders may rely on your year to date (YTD) income, and instead calculate your yearly income from that.

How long does Bankwest take to approve home loans?

Full approval for a home loan usually involves a property valuation, which, Bankwest suggests, can take “a week or two”. As a result, getting your home loan approved may take longer. However, you may get full approval within this time if you applied for and received conditional approval, sometimes called a pre-approval, from Bankwest before finalising the home you want to buy.  

Another way of speeding up approvals can be by completing, signing, and submitting your home loan application digitally. Essentially, you give the bank or your mortgage broker a copy of your home’s sale contract and then complete the rest of the steps online. Bankwest has claimed this cuts the approval time to less than four days, although this may only happen if your income and credit history can be verified easily, or if your home’s valuation doesn’t take time.

Why should I get an ING home loan pre-approval?

When you apply for an ING home loan pre-approval, you might be required to provide proof of employment and income, savings, as well as details on any on-going debts. The lender could also make a credit enquiry against your name. If you’re pre-approved, you will know how much money ING is willing to lend you. 

Please note, however, that a pre-approval is nothing more than an idea of your ability to borrow funds and is not the final approval. You should receive the home loan approval  only after finalising the property and submitting a formal loan application to the lender, ING. Additionally, a pre-approval does not stay valid indefinitely, since your financial circumstances and the home loan market could change overnight.

 

 

How can I get ANZ home loan pre-approval?

Shopping for a new home is an exciting experience and getting a pre-approval on the loan may give you the peace of mind that you are looking at properties within your budget. 

At the time of applying for the ANZ Bank home loan pre-approval, you will be required to provide proof of employment and income, along with records of your savings and debts.

An ANZ home loan pre-approval time frame is usually up to three months. However, being pre-approved doesn’t necessarily mean you will get your home loan. Other factors could lead to your home loan application being rejected, even with a prior pre-approval. Some factors include the property evaluation not meeting the bank’s criteria or a change in your financial circumstances.

You can make an application for ANZ home loan pre-approval online or call on 1800100641 Mon-Fri 8.00 am to 8.00 pm (AEST).

Does Australia have no cost refinancing?

No Cost Refinancing is an option available in the US where the lender or broker covers your switching costs, such as appraisal fees and settlement costs. Unfortunately, no cost refinancing isn’t available in Australia.