Owning your own home just got 0.85% more affordable

Owning your own home just got 0.85% more affordable

Sick of being beaten at an auction by a cashed-up investor? Well crack the bubbles because the tables might be turning – ever so slightly – in your favour with the introduction of lower home loan rates for owner occupiers.

Just a few months ago, banks were offering the same rate whether you were an investor or a person who wants to buy and live in your own home.  Not anymore.

Since July, RateCity has seen a major jump in lenders offering higher rates for investors as the banks try to re-balance their books towards owner-occupiers.

RateCity’s banking analyst Peter Arnold says it’s not just the investor rates that are increasing.

“Lenders are offering sharper deals to owner-occupiers. Which means if you’ve been dreaming of owning and living in your own home – this just got slightly easier.

“Almost half of all lenders have introduced two streams of interest rates – with differences as high as 0.85 percentage points.  That might not seem like much right now but 30 years down the track it can translate into thousands of dollars,” Arnold says.

While it might not compensate for the competitiveness in some property markets, it is a step in the right direction for first home buyers and families that just want to own the roof they sleep under.

“For the last 10 years, owner-occupiers and investors have generally had the same deal on rates. Now we’re seeing a major shift in lending, particularly from the major banks,” Arnold says.

Why the change?

The national regulator, Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority (APRA) has been calling on banks to limit the increase in investor loans to 10 per cent.  So what they are doing with these offers, is essentially trying to rebalance their book back towards owner-occupiers.

Finance expert Peter Switzer explains, “the banks don’t really want to hit their investor home loan customers, but they have been instructed by [APRA] at the behest of the Reserve Bank of Australia which has been stressed out by the so-call bubble in Sydney house prices.”

“Investors are seen as risky and are being partly blamed for the enthusiastic bidding at auctions being driven by the tax deductibility of their interest repayments, the very low borrowing rates and the fact that property returns look so much better than term deposit rates,” Switzer says.

So who is offering what?

“Initially, most of the action was from the major banks, who are the main ones with the regulator on their case,” says Arnold.

“That said, increasingly smaller lenders are following suit and overtime I think we’ll see the majority of lenders use this differential pricing.”

Martin North of Digital Finance Analytics told the SMH that the owner-occupier rates being offered to customers were dropping by the week.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that the battle ground now is absolutely owner-occupied loans,” North says.

Biggest Margins as at 30 September 2015

Company

Margin

Std Variable Owner Occ

Std Variable –  Investor

bcu

0.55%

4.63%

5.18%

ING DIRECT

0.85%

3.99%

4.84%

ME Bank

0.51%

4.88%

5.39%

Mortgage HOUSE

0.70%

3.95%

4.65%

MyState

0.75%

3.99%

4.74%

UBank

0.72%

3.99%

4.71%

Have banks done this before?

Yes. During the global financial crisis, banks cracked down on business lending by introducing different prices based on risk.

One of the big factors that determine whether you’re a worthy candidate for a loan, and the price of borrowing, is risk. When the GFC hit, lenders deemed small businesses as being risky and either stopped lending to them or charged a premium.

Now we’re seeing a similar thing in the property market – banks are less inclined to lend to investors because APRA, the regular, has deemed investors too much investor lending as a risk to the system.

Risk-based pricing is something that’s been spoken about in the mortgage industry for about five years and this is essentially an extension of that.

Why are investors seen to be more risky?

Investors are more likely to pull out of the market at any time.  They’re not living in the house so it’s not like they have to pack up and find a new home. 

Investors are often quite highly leveraged as well. Because this is deemed as more risky the banks have to hold more capital for lending and so the banks are charging more interest and also lending less as well.

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Remaining loan term

The length of time it will take to pay off your current home loan, based on the currently-entered mortgage balance, monthly repayment and interest rate.

Savings over

Select a number of years to see how much money you can save with different home loans over time.

e.g. To see how much you could save in two years by switching mortgages,  set the slider to 2.

Can I apply for an ANZ non-resident home loan? 

You may be eligible to apply for an ANZ non-resident home loan only if you meet the following two conditions:

  1. You hold a Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa or its predecessor, the Temporary Skilled Work (subclass 457) visa.
  2. Your job is included in the Australian government’s Medium and Long Term Strategic Skills List. 

However, non-resident home loan applications may need Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB) approval in addition to meeting ANZ’s Mortgage Credit Requirements. Also, they may not be eligible for loans that require paying for Lender’s Mortgage Insurance (LMI). As a result, you may not be able to borrow more than 80 per cent of your home’s value. However, you can apply as a co-borrower with your spouse if they are a citizen of either Australia or New Zealand, or are a permanent resident.

Why should I get an ING home loan pre-approval?

When you apply for an ING home loan pre-approval, you might be required to provide proof of employment and income, savings, as well as details on any on-going debts. The lender could also make a credit enquiry against your name. If you’re pre-approved, you will know how much money ING is willing to lend you. 

Please note, however, that a pre-approval is nothing more than an idea of your ability to borrow funds and is not the final approval. You should receive the home loan approval  only after finalising the property and submitting a formal loan application to the lender, ING. Additionally, a pre-approval does not stay valid indefinitely, since your financial circumstances and the home loan market could change overnight.

 

 

Interest Rate

Your current home loan interest rate. To accurately calculate how much you could save, an accurate interest figure is required. If you are not certain, check your bank statement or log into your mortgage account.

How common are low-deposit home loans?

Low-deposit home loans aren’t as common as they once were, because they’re regarded as relatively risky and the banking regulator (APRA) is trying to reduce risk from the mortgage market.

However, if you do your research, you’ll find there is still a fairly wide selection of banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders that offers low-deposit home loans.

How can I get a home loan with bad credit?

If you want to get a home loan with bad credit, you need to convince a lender that your problems are behind you and that you will, indeed, be able to repay a mortgage.

One step you might want to take is to visit a mortgage broker who specialises in bad credit home loans (also known as ‘non-conforming home loans’ or ‘sub-prime home loans’). An experienced broker will know which lenders to approach, and how to plead your case with each of them.

Two points to bear in mind are:

  • Many home loan lenders don’t provide bad credit mortgages
  • Each lender has its own policies, and therefore favours different things

If you’d prefer to directly approach the lender yourself, you’re more likely to find success with smaller non-bank lenders that specialise in bad credit home loans (as opposed to bigger banks that prefer ‘vanilla’ mortgages). That’s because these smaller lenders are more likely to treat you as a unique individual rather than judge you according to a one-size-fits-all policy.

Lenders try to minimise their risk, so if you want to get a home loan with bad credit, you need to do everything you can to convince lenders that you’re safer than your credit history might suggest. If possible, provide paperwork that shows:

  • You have a secure job
  • You have a steady income
  • You’ve been reducing your debts
  • You’ve been increasing your savings

How can I calculate interest on my home loan?

You can calculate the total interest you will pay over the life of your loan by using a mortgage calculator. The calculator will estimate your repayments based on the amount you want to borrow, the interest rate, the length of your loan, whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor and whether you plan to pay ‘principal and interest’ or ‘interest-only’.

If you are buying a new home, the calculator will also help you work out how much you’ll need to pay in stamp duty and other related costs.

What do mortgage brokers do?

Mortgage brokers are finance professionals who help borrowers organise home loans with lenders. As such, they act as middlemen between borrowers and lenders.

While bank staff recommend home loan products only from their own employer, brokers are independent, so they can recommend products from a range of institutions.

Brokers need to be accredited with a particular lender to be able to work with that lender. A typical broker will be accredited with anywhere from 10 to 30 lenders – the big four banks, as well as a range of smaller banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders.

As a general rule, brokers don’t charge consumers for their services; instead, they receive commissions from lenders whenever they place a borrower with that institution.

What are the responsibilities of a mortgage broker?

Mortgage brokers act as the go-between for borrowers looking for a home loan and the lenders offering the loan. They offer personalised advice to help borrowers choose the right home loan for their needs.

In Australia, mortgage brokers are required by law to carry an Australian Credit License (ACL) if they offer credit assistance services. Which is the legal term for guidance regarding the different kinds of credit offered by lenders, including home loan mortgages. They may not need this license if they are working for an aggregator, for instance, as a franchisee. In both these situations, they need to comply with the regulations laid down by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC).

These regulations, which are stipulated by Australian legislation, require mortgage brokers to comply with what are called “responsible lending” and “best interest” obligations. Responsible lending obligations mean brokers have to suggest “suitable” home loans. This means loans that you can easily qualify for,  actually meet your needs, and don’t prove unnecessarily challenging for you.

Starting 1 January 2021, mortgage brokers must comply with best interest obligations in addition to responsible lending obligations. These require mortgage brokers to act in the best interest of their customers and also requires them to prioritise their customers’ interests over their own. For instance, a mortgage broker may not recommend a lender who gives them a commission if that lender’s home loan offer does not benefit that particular customer.

Who offers 40 year mortgages?

Home loans spanning 40 years are offered by select lenders, though the loan period is much longer than a standard 30-year home loan. You're more likely to find a maximum of 35 years, such as is the case with Teacher’s Mutual Bank

Currently, 40 year home loan lenders in Australia include AlphaBeta Money, BCU, G&C Mutual Bank, Pepper, and Sydney Mutual Bank.

Even though these lengthier loans 35 to 40 year loans do exist on the market, they are not overwhelmingly popular, as the extra interest you pay compared to a 30-year loan can be over $100,000 or more.

What happens to my home loan when interest rates rise?

If you are on a variable rate home loan, every so often your rate will be subject to increases and decreases. Rate changes are determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, however often when the RBA changes the cash rate, a number of banks will follow suit, at least to some extent. You can use RateCity cash rate to check how the latest interest rate change affected your mortgage interest rate.

When your rate rises, you will be required to pay your bank more each month in mortgage repayments. Similarly, if your interest rate is cut, then your monthly repayments will decrease. Your lender will notify you of what your new repayments will be, although you can do the calculations yourself, and compare other home loan rates using our mortgage calculator.

There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.

What are the pros and cons of no-deposit home loans?

It’s no longer possible to get a no-deposit home loan in Australia. In some circumstances, you might be able to take out a mortgage with a 5 per cent deposit – but before you do so, it’s important to weigh up the pros and cons.

The big advantage of borrowing 95 per cent (also known as a 95 per cent home loan) is that you get to buy your property sooner. That may be particularly important if you plan to purchase in a rising market, where prices are increasing faster than you can accumulate savings.

But 95 per cent home loans also have disadvantages. First, the 95 per cent home loan market is relatively small, so you’ll have fewer options to choose from. Second, you’ll probably have to pay LMI (lender’s mortgage insurance). Third, you’ll probably be charged a higher interest rate. Fourth, the more you borrow, the more you’ll ultimately have to pay in interest. Fifth, if your property declines in value, your mortgage might end up being worth more than your home.

What is the best interest rate for a mortgage?

The fastest way to find out what the lowest interest rates on the market are is to use a comparison website.

While a low interest rate is highly preferable, it is not the only factor that will determine whether a particular loan is right for you.

Loans with low interest rates can often include hidden catches, such as high fees or a period of low rates which jumps up after the introductory period has ended.

To work out the best value for money, have a look at a loan’s comparison rate and read the fine print to get across all the fees and charges that you could be theoretically charged over the life of the loan.