Prevent your mortgage from limiting your lifestyle

Tips for preventing your mortgage from limiting your lifestyle

The great Australian dream of owning a home can quickly turn into a nightmare if your new home sucks up your entire income, leaving little left over for a comfortable lifestyle.

For thousands of first home buyers, the nightmare is even more acute, with mortgage stress becoming an increasingly common problem. According to a study of 26,000 households conducted in 2012 by research company Digital Finance Analytics, 16 percent of first home buyers in Australia are under mortgage stress. 

Avoid over-extending your finances

The key to avoiding mortgage stress and maintaining your pre-mortgage lifestyle is to ensure you don’t over-extend yourself with a huge loan, said financial adviser Greg Pride of Centric Wealth. “Over-extending yourself is a surefire way to a pretty miserable existence,” he added.

Pride advises ensuring that no more than 30 percent of your take-home pay is assigned to the mortgage. “Above that, things start to compromise and you have to decide whether you want to miss out on your weekly night out or holidays,” he said.

EXAMPLE

If your monthly household income after tax is $10,000, your mortgage repayments should be no more than $3000 a month.

A good idea is to compare home loans and use online mortgage calculators to determine what the monthly repayments on various borrowing amounts would be before you talk to a lender.

Budget for interest rate rises

Deborah Kent, financial adviser with Integra Financial Services, agrees that the only way to prevent your mortgage from limiting your lifestyle is to avoid over-extending yourself. Her tip? Don’t be seduced by historically low interest rates to sign up for a big first mortgage – instead, calculate what your repayments would be at a higher rate, such as 8 percent, and choose the best mortgage accordingly.

“Work out if you can survive if the interest rate rises to 8 percent,” Kent said. “Preparation is very much the key to avoid running into financial problems later on, especially when interest rates are low and people are tempted to borrow more.”

“But ask yourself, ‘do I really need the $1 million house or can I spend $800,000 and upgrade later?”

However, no matter how much you borrow, you will have to adjust your lifestyle, Kent argued.

“You will have to make some sacrifices,” she said. “You may have to cut down from going out four times a week to twice a week. A good solution is to entertain at home – it’s a great way to catch up with people without spending a lot of money, and you get to show off your new home.”

Compare first mortgages:

Related links

Did you find this helpful? Why not share this article?

Advertisement

RateCity

Money Health Newsletter

Subscribe for news, tips and expert opinions to help you make smarter financial decisions

By signing up, you agree to the ratecity.com.au Privacy & Cookies Policy and Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy

Advertisement

Learn more about home loans

What is bridging finance?

A loan of shorter duration taken to buy a new property before a borrower sells an existing property, usually taken to cover the financial gap that occurs while buying a new property without first selling an older one.

Usually, these loans have higher interest rates and a shorter repayment duration.

How common are low-deposit home loans?

Low-deposit home loans aren’t as common as they once were, because they’re regarded as relatively risky and the banking regulator (APRA) is trying to reduce risk from the mortgage market.

However, if you do your research, you’ll find there is still a fairly wide selection of banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders that offers low-deposit home loans.

What is a fixed home loan?

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

What factors does Real Time Ratings consider?

Real Time RatingsTM uses a range of information to provide personalised results:

  • Your loan amount
  • Your borrowing status (whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor)
  • Your loan-to-value ratio (LVR)
  • Your personal preferences (such as whether you want an offset account or to be able to make extra repayments)
  • Product information (such as a loan’s interest rate, fees and LVR requirements)
  • Market changes (such as when new loans come on to the market)

Mortgage Calculator, Repayment Type

Will you pay off the amount you borrowed + interest or just the interest for a period?

What is the amortisation period?

Popularly known as the loan term, the amortisation period is the time over which the borrower must pay back both the loan’s principal and interest. It is usually determined during the application approval process.

What does going guarantor' mean?

Going guarantor means a person offers up the equity in their home as security for your loan. This is a serious commitment which can have major repercussions if the person is not able to make their repayments and defaults on their loan. In this scenario, the bank will legally be able to the guarantor until the debt is settled.

Not everyone can be a guarantor. Lenders will generally only allow immediate family members to act as a guarantor but this can sometimes be stretched to include extended family depending on the circumstances.

What happens to your mortgage when you die?

There is no hard and fast answer to what will happen to your mortgage when you die as it is largely dependent on what you have set out in your mortgage agreement, your will (if you have one), other assets you may have and if you have insurance. If you have co-signed the mortgage with another person that person will become responsible for the remaining debt when you die.

If the mortgage is in your name only the house will be sold by the bank to cover the remaining debt and your nominated air will receive the remaining sum if there is a difference. If there is a turn in the market and the sale of your house won’t cover the remaining debt the case may go to court and the difference may have to be covered by the sale of other assets.  

If you have a life insurance policy your family may be able to use some of the lump sum payment from this to pay down the remaining mortgage debt. Alternatively, your lender may provide some form of mortgage protection that could assist your family in making repayments following your passing.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Results

These are the loans that may be suitable, based on your pre-selected criteria. 

Why should you trust Real Time Ratings?

Real Time Ratings™ was conceived by a team of data experts who have been analysing trends and behaviour in the home loan market for more than a decade. It was designed purely to meet the evolving needs of home loan customers who wish to merge low cost with flexible features quickly. We believe it fills a glaring gap in the market by frequently re-rating loan products based on the changes lenders make daily.

Real Time Ratings™ is a new idea and will change over time to match the frequently-evolving demands of the market. Some things won’t change though – it will always rate all relevent products in our database and will not be influenced by advertising.

If you have any feedback about Real Time Ratings™, please get in touch.

What is the average annual percentage rate?

Also known as the comparison rate, or sometimes the ‘true rate’ of a loan, the average annual percentage rate (AAPR) is used to indicate the overall cost of a loan after considering all the fees, charges and other factors, such as introductory offers and honeymoon rates.

The AAPR is calculated based on a standardised loan amount and loan term, and doesn’t include any extra non-standard charges.

How much information is required to get a rating?

You don’t need to input any information to see the default ratings. But the more you tell us, the more relevant the ratings will become to you. We take your personal privacy seriously. If you are concerned about inputting your information, please read our privacy policy.

What is appraised value?

An estimation of a property’s value before beginning the mortgage approval process. An appraiser (or valuer) is an expert who estimates the value of a property. The lender generally selects the appraiser or valuer before sanctioning the loan.

What is the flexibility score?

Today’s home loans often try to lure borrowers with a range of flexible features, including offset accounts, redraw facilities, repayment frequency options, repayment holidays, split loan options and portability. Real Time Ratings™ weights each of these features based on popularity and gives loans a ‘flexibility score’ based on how much they cater to borrowers’ needs over time. The aim is to give a higher score to loans which give borrowers more features and options.