Slash your grocery bill

Slash your grocery bill

The biggest cost we face involves putting a roof over our head, with housing – rent or mortgage – accounting for 18 percent of our weekly spend.

But a recent Trolley Trends report by Woolworths found groceries run a close second, with food and non-alcoholic drinks accounting for the second largest share of our wallet at 17 percent.

Not surprisingly that makes supermarkets big business, and the major chains leave nothing to chance when it comes to getting consumers to open their wallets. But a few simple strategies could see you pocket valuable savings on weekly groceries.

Shop on quieter days

According to the report, Sunday is becoming the new Saturday for supermarket shopping, with 18 percent of Australians making Sunday their primary shopping day. However, this can be one of the most expensive days to fill your pantry.

Nicola Field, author of Baby or Bust said, “Many supermarkets stock up late in the week in anticipation of the weekend shopping rush. That means Mondays and Tuesdays are often mark down days when perishables like meat can be purchased at generous discounts – stock up your freezer and save.”

Wait until late in the day

Field also believes that daily discounts are available to shoppers who delay visiting the supermarket until late in the afternoon. She explains, “Late afternoon and early evening are great times to shop when items that are produced daily like bakery goods or prepared salads are often heavily reduced.”

Stack up the savings with generics

A $1 loaf of home brand bread versus around $3 for a branded product? It’s a no-brainer that no-frills means big savings – and not just on price. For basics like sugar and you probably won’t even pick the difference. A 2013 survey of milk by consumer group Choice found consumers are not sacrificing drinking taste when choosing supermarket brand milk.

Cast your eye

There’s nothing random about product placement on supermarket shelves. The most expensive items are often located at eye level because marketing experts know we tend to reach for what’s in front of us. Cast your eye to the top and bottom shelves and you’ll often find a budget priced product.

Use unit pricing

Unit pricing was introduced in Australia in 2010 and it’s a shopper’s best friend letting you compare value even when similar products are packed in different weights or volumes.  You’ll find the unit pricing details displayed on shelves, and they provide an on-the-spot answer to which product offers best value.

Put your savings to work

Small savings at the supermarket checkout can translate to big long term gains, if you put your money to work. Adding extra savings to your home loan, for instance, can go a long way to reducing the amount of interest charged. RateCity’s home loan calculator shows that paying an extra $50 per month towards a $300,000 home loan at the current average variable rate could reduce the interest bill by more than $15,000 over 25 years.

Did you find this helpful? Why not share this article?

Advertisement

RateCity

Money Health Newsletter

Subscribe for news, tips and expert opinions to help you make smarter financial decisions

By signing up, you agree to the ratecity.com.au Privacy & Cookies Policy and Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy

Advertisement

Learn more about home loans

How do guaranteed home loans work?

A guaranteed home loan involves a guarantor (often a parent) promising to pay off a mortgage if the principal borrower (often the child) fails to do so. The guarantor will also have to provide security, which is often the family home.

The principal borrower will usually be someone struggling to find the money to enter the property market. By partnering with a guarantor, the borrower increases their financial power and becomes less of a risk in the eyes of lenders. As a result, the borrower may:

  • Qualify for a mortgage that they would have otherwise been denied
  • Not be required to pay lender’s mortgage insurance (LMI)
  • Be charged a lower interest rate
  • Be charged less in fees

Does Australia have no cost refinancing?

No Cost Refinancing is an option available in the US where the lender or broker covers your switching costs, such as appraisal fees and settlement costs. Unfortunately, no cost refinancing isn’t available in Australia.

Can I change jobs while I am applying for a home loan?

Whether you’re a new borrower or you’re refinancing your home loan, many lenders require you to be in a permanent job with the same employer for at least 6 months before applying for a home loan. Different lenders have different requirements. 

If your work situation changes for any reason while you’re applying for a mortgage, this could reduce your chances of successfully completing the process. Contacting the lender as soon as you know your employment situation is changing may allow you to work something out. 

Can I get a home loan if I am on an employment contract?

Some lenders will allow you to apply for a mortgage if you are a contractor or freelancer. However, many lenders prefer you to be in a permanent, ongoing role, because a more stable income means you’re more likely to keep up with your repayments.

If you’re a contractor, freelancer, or are otherwise self-employed, it may still be possible to apply for a low-doc home loan, as these mortgages require less specific proof of income.

Will I have to pay lenders' mortgage insurance twice if I refinance?

If your deposit was less than 20 per cent of your property’s value when you took out your original loan, you may have paid lenders’ mortgage insurance (LMI) to cover the lender against the risk that you may default on your repayments. 

If you refinance to a new home loan, but still don’t have enough deposit and/or equity to provide 20 per cent security, you’ll need to pay for the lender’s LMI a second time. This could potentially add thousands or tens of thousands of dollars in upfront costs to your mortgage, so it’s important to consider whether the financial benefits of refinancing may be worth these costs.

Is there a limit to how many times I can refinance?

There is no set limit to how many times you are allowed to refinance. Some surveyed RateCity users have refinanced up to three times.

However, if you refinance several times in short succession, it could affect your credit score. Lenders assess your credit score when you apply for new loans, so if you end up with bad credit, you may not be able to refinance if and when you really need to.

Before refinancing multiple times, consider getting a copy of your credit report and ensure your credit history is in good shape for future refinances.

I have a poor credit rating. Am I still able to get a mortgage?

Some lenders still allow you to apply for a home loan if you have impaired credit. However, you may pay a slightly higher interest rate and/or higher fees. This is to help offset the higher risk that you may default on your repayments.

I can't pick a loan. Should I apply to multiple lenders?

Applying for home loans with multiple lenders at once can affect your credit history, as multiple loan applications in short succession can make you look like a risky borrower. Comparing home loans from different lenders, assessing their features and benefits, and making one application to a preferred lender may help to improve your chances of success

Will I be paying two mortgages at once when I refinance?

No, given the way the loan and title transfer works, you will not have to pay two mortgages at the one time. You will make your last monthly repayment on loan number one and then the following month you will start paying off loan number two.

If I don't like my new lender after I refinance, can I go back to my previous lender?

If you wish to return to your previous lender after refinancing, you will have to go through the refinancing process again and pay a second set of discharge and upfront fees. 

Therefore, before you refinance, it’s important to weigh up the new prospective lender against your current lender in a number of areas, including fees, flexibility, customer service and interest rate.

Can I refinance if I have other products bundled with my home loan?

If your home loan was part of a package deal that included access to credit cards, transaction accounts or term deposits from the same lender, switching all of these over to a new lender can seem daunting. However, some lenders offer to manage part of this process for you as an incentive to refinance with them – contact your lender to learn more about what they offer.

How do I know if I have to pay LMI?

Each lender has its own policies, but as a general rule you will have to pay lender’s mortgage insurance (LMI) if your loan-to-value ratio (LVR) exceeds 80 per cent. This applies whether you’re taking out a new home loan or you’re refinancing.

If you’re looking to buy a property, you can use this LMI calculator to work out how much you’re likely to be charged in LMI.

How common are low-deposit home loans?

Low-deposit home loans aren’t as common as they once were, because they’re regarded as relatively risky and the banking regulator (APRA) is trying to reduce risk from the mortgage market.

However, if you do your research, you’ll find there is still a fairly wide selection of banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders that offers low-deposit home loans.

How do I take out a low-deposit home loan?

If you want to take out a low-deposit home loan, it might be a good idea to consult a mortgage broker who can give you professional financial advice and organise the mortgage for you.

Another way to take out a low-deposit home loan is to do your own research with a comparison website like RateCity. Once you’ve identified your preferred mortgage, you can apply through RateCity or go direct to the lender.