The pros and cons of investment property

The pros and cons of investment property

Property is a popular investment choice for Australians but deciding if it is the right place to invest your hard-earned money can be a difficult one. Consider the pros and cons before you dive head-first into a long-term investment. This will put your mind at ease and allow you to suitably assess if property investment is right for you. 

What is an investment property?

An investment property is real estate that is purchased by investors for investment purposes. Investors usually rent out the property and use the income received to pay off their loan with the intention of owning the asset and possibly generating capital growth by selling it for a higher price than the original purchase price.

An investment property can be in the form of residential such as house, unit and townhouse or non-residential such as land, commercial or an industrial property.

Purchasing an investment property is a popular choice for investors in Australia as the market can be safer and less volatile compared to other investments, however there are no guarantees and still has its disadvantages.

The pros of property investment

  • You can earn rental income from having tenants rent out your investment property.
  • Benefit from capital growth if you buy at a good price and the property increases in value.
  • The interest on an investment home loans is tax deductable.
  • Property investment can be less volatile than shares.
  • Unlike shares, your property is a physical investment that you can see and touch.

The cons of property investment

  • Your rental income usually won’t cover your total mortgage repayments so you may have to invest some of your income for repayments and expenses.
  • You are a slave to the property market; Interest rate rises will affect your return and put the pinch on your disposable income and if the property market goes down, so too does your investment. 
  • Unlike shares you can’t just sell off a section of you investment if you need some quick cash.
  • There are high entry and exit costs associated with property investment.
  • If you go through periods without tenants you have to be prepared to cover the entire costs.

If you’ve weighed up the pros and cons and think property investment is the right next step for you, jump into our home loan comparison page and mortgage repayment calculator to get started on your investment calculations.

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Learn more about home loans

What is an investment loan?

An investment loan is a home loan that is taken out to purchase a property purely for investment purposes. This means that the purchaser will not be living in the property but will instead rent it out or simply retain it for purposes of capital growth.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Purpose

This is what you will use the loan for – i.e. investment. 

What is appraised value?

An estimation of a property’s value before beginning the mortgage approval process. An appraiser (or valuer) is an expert who estimates the value of a property. The lender generally selects the appraiser or valuer before sanctioning the loan.

Interest Rate

Your current home loan interest rate. To accurately calculate how much you could save, an accurate interest figure is required. If you are not certain, check your bank statement or log into your mortgage account.

What is a construction loan?

A construction loan is loan taken out for the purpose of building or substantially renovating a residential property. Under this type of loan, the funds are released in stages when certain milestones in the construction process are reached. Once the building is complete, the loan will revert to a standard principal and interest mortgage.

What is a specialist lender?

Specialist lenders, also known as non-conforming lenders, are lenders that offer mortgages to ‘non-vanilla’ borrowers who struggle to get finance at mainstream banks.

That includes people with bad credit, as well as borrowers who are self-employed, in casual employment or are new to Australia.

Specialist lenders take a much more flexible approach to assessing mortgage applications than mainstream banks.

Why is it important to get the most up-to-date information?

The mortgage market changes constantly. Every week, new products get launched and existing products get tweaked. Yet many ratings and awards systems rank products annually or biannually.

We update our product data as soon as possible when lenders make changes, so if a bank hikes its interest rates or changes its product, the system will quickly re-evaluate it.

Nobody wants to read a weather forecast that is six months old, and the same is true for home loan comparisons.

What is a redraw fee?

Redraw fees are charged by your lender when you want to take money you have already paid into your mortgage back out. Typically, banks will only allow you to take money out of your loan if you have a redraw facility attached to your loan, and the money you are taking out is part of any additional repayments you’ve made. The average redraw fee is around $19 however there are plenty of lenders who include a number of fee-free redraws a year. Tip: Negative-gearers beware – any money redrawn is often treated as new borrowing for tax purposes, so there may be limits on how you can use it if you want to maximise your tax deduction.

How often is your data updated?

We work closely with lenders to get updates as quick as possible, with updates made the same day wherever possible.

Mortgage Calculator, Property Value

An estimate of how much your desired property is worth. 

What do mortgage brokers do?

Mortgage brokers are finance professionals who help borrowers organise home loans with lenders. As such, they act as middlemen between borrowers and lenders.

While bank staff recommend home loan products only from their own employer, brokers are independent, so they can recommend products from a range of institutions.

Brokers need to be accredited with a particular lender to be able to work with that lender. A typical broker will be accredited with anywhere from 10 to 30 lenders – the big four banks, as well as a range of smaller banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders.

As a general rule, brokers don’t charge consumers for their services; instead, they receive commissions from lenders whenever they place a borrower with that institution.

How much information is required to get a rating?

You don’t need to input any information to see the default ratings. But the more you tell us, the more relevant the ratings will become to you. We take your personal privacy seriously. If you are concerned about inputting your information, please read our privacy policy.

Who offers 40 year mortgages?

Home loans spanning 40 years are offered by select lenders, though the loan period is much longer than a standard 30-year home loan. You're more likely to find a maximum of 35 years, such as is the case with Teacher’s Mutual Bank

Currently, 40 year home loan lenders in Australia include AlphaBeta Money, BCU, G&C Mutual Bank, Pepper, and Sydney Mutual Bank.

Even though these lengthier loans 35 to 40 year loans do exist on the market, they are not overwhelmingly popular, as the extra interest you pay compared to a 30-year loan can be over $100,000 or more.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Results

These are the loans that may be suitable, based on your pre-selected criteria.