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Country versus City, dwelling values vary around Australia

Country versus City, dwelling values vary around Australia

While housing affordability in Australia’s capital cities have been in focus over recent months, recent stats from CoreLogic show marked differences in regional dwelling values between the states and territories.

While dwelling values across Australia’s national regional housing markets were found to have remained flat over the month of October according to the CoreLogic home value index results for October 2017, they showed a -0.1% quarterly decline, the largest since 2014, and a 4.9% annual improvement, the lowest since February 2017.

NSW – Country

Regional New South Wales saw monthly growth of 0.2%, quarterly growth of 0.7% and annual growth of 9.7%. While these growth rates are slowing compared to prior figures, regional NSW has recorded faster annual growth than Sydney over the past two months.

VIC – City

Regional Victoria saw dwelling values grow by 0.3%, the area’s greatest monthly increase since April 2017. However, on a quarterly basis, values dropped by -0.3%. Dwelling values in regional Victoria were also found to be increasing much more slowly than those of Melbourne, with increases of 4.4% and 11% respectively.

QLD – City

Regional Queensland saw dwelling values fall -0.2% monthly and -0.5% quarterly, though they were found to be 1.6% higher than those recorded last year. This annual value growth remains slower than the moderate growth recorded in Brisbane.

SA – City

Regional South Australia recorded consistent declines, dropping -0.5% monthly, -2.1% quarterly, and -9% annually – weaker results than the moderate increases recorded in Adelaide.

WA – City

Regional Western Australia saw dwelling values fall by -0.4% in October, -1.4% over the past quarter, and by -3.0% over the past year. These are steeper declines than what’s been recorded in Perth, where dwelling values have actually not fallen for the past two months.

TAS – City

Regional Tasmania saw dwelling values increase by 0.3% in October 2017. While these values were down -0.4% over the past quarter, they were up by 5.4% on an annual basis, an improvement of 1.7% on the previous year’s figures. However, this grow is still slower than that of Hobart.

NT – Country

Regional Northern Territory saw dwelling values increase by 1.1% over the past month, 0.7% over the past quarter, and 1.3% over the past year. Even this modest growth was up on Darwin, which saw dwelling values fall by -5.7% on an annual basis.

Regional dwelling values in October 2017

State/TerritoryMonthly changeQuarterly changeAnnual change
NSW0.2%0.7%9.7%
VIC0.3%-0.3%4.4%
QLD-0.2%-0.5%1.6%
SA-0.5%-2.1%-9%
WA-0.4%-1.4%-3%
TAS0.3%-0.4%5.4%
NT1.1%0.7%1.3%
National-0.1%4.9%

Source: CoreLogic

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Learn more about home loans

When do mortgage payments start after settlement?

Generally speaking, your first mortgage payment falls due one month after the settlement date. However, this may vary based on your mortgage terms. You can check the exact date by contacting your lender.

Usually your settlement agent will meet the seller’s representatives to exchange documents at an agreed place and time. The balance purchase price is paid to the seller. The lender will register a mortgage against your title and give you the funds to purchase the new home.

Once the settlement process is complete, the lender allows you to draw down the loan. The loan amount is debited from your loan account. As soon as the settlement paperwork is sorted, you can collect the keys to your new home and work your way through the moving-in checklist.

Why does Westpac charge an early termination fee for home loans?

The Westpac home loan early termination fee or break cost is applicable if you have a fixed rate home loan and repay part of or the whole outstanding amount before the fixed period ends. If you’re switching between products before the fixed period ends, you’ll pay a switching break cost and an administrative fee. 

The Westpac home loan early termination fee may not apply if you repay an amount below the prepayment threshold. The prepayment threshold is the amount Westpac allows you to repay during the fixed period outside your regular repayments.

Westpac charges this fee because when you take out a home loan, the bank borrows the funds with wholesale rates available to banks and lenders. Westpac will then work out your interest rate based on you making regular repayments for a fixed period. If you repay before this period ends, the lender may incur a loss if there is any change in the wholesale rate of interest.

What are the features of home loans for expats from Westpac?

If you’re an Australian citizen living and working abroad, you can borrow to buy a property in Australia. With a Westpac non-resident home loan, you can borrow up to 80 per cent of the property value to purchase a property whilst living overseas. The minimum loan amount for these loans is $25,000, with a maximum loan term of 30 years.

The interest rates and other fees for Westpac non-resident home loans are the same as regular home loans offered to borrowers living in Australia. You’ll have to submit proof of income, six-month bank statements, an employment letter, and your last two payslips. You may also be required to submit a copy of your passport and visa that shows you’re allowed to live and work abroad.

When does Commonwealth Bank charge an early exit fee?

When you take out a fixed interest home loan with the Commonwealth Bank, you’re able to lock the interest for a particular period. If the rates change during this period, your repayments remain unchanged. If you break the loan during the fixed interest period, you’ll have to pay the Commonwealth Bank home loan early exit fee and an administrative fee.

The Early Repayment Adjustment (ERA) and Administrative fees are applicable in the following instances:

  • If you switch your loan from fixed interest to variable rate
  • When you apply for a top-up home loan
  • If you repay over and above the annual threshold limit, which is $10,000 per year during the fixed interest period
  • When you prepay the entire outstanding loan balance before the end of the fixed interest duration.

The fee calculation depends on the interest rates, the amount you’ve repaid and the loan size. You can contact the lender to understand more about what you may have to pay. 

Cash or mortgage – which is more suitable to buy an investment property?

Deciding whether to buy an investment property with cash or a mortgage is a matter or personal choice and will often depend on your financial situation. Using cash may seem logical if you have the money in reserve and it can allow you to later use the equity in your home. However, there may be other factors to think about, such as whether there are other debts to pay down and whether it will tie up all of your spare cash. Again, it’s a personal choice and may be worth seeking personal advice.

A mortgage is a popular option for people who don’t have enough cash in the bank to pay for an investment property. Sometimes when you take out a mortgage you can offset your loan interest against the rental income you may earn. The rental income can also help to pay down the loan.

What is an ongoing fee?

Ongoing fees are any regular payments charged by your lender in addition to the interest they apply including annual fees, monthly account keeping fees and offset fees. The average annual fee is close to $200 however there are almost 2,000 home loan products that don’t charge an annual fee at all. There’s plenty of extra costs when you’re buying a home, such as conveyancing, stamp duty, moving costs, so the more fees you can avoid on your home loan, the better. While $200 might not seem like much in the grand scheme of things, it adds up to $6,000 over the life of a 30 year loan – money which would be much better off either reinvested into your home loan or in your back pocket for the next rainy day.

Example: Anna is tossing up between two different mortgage products. Both have the same variable interest rate, but one has a monthly account keeping fee of $20. By picking the loan with no fees, and investing an extra $20 a month into her loan, Josie will end up shaving 6 months off her 30 year loan and saving over $9,000* in interest repayments.

How do I calculate monthly mortgage repayments?

Work out your mortgage repayments using a home loan calculator that takes into account your deposit size, property value and interest rate. This is divided by the loan term you choose (for example, there are 360 months in a 30-year mortgage) to determine the monthly repayments over this time frame.

Over the course of your loan, your monthly repayment amount will be affected by changes to your interest rate, plus any circumstances where you opt to pay interest-only for a period of time, instead of principal and interest.

Who offers 40 year mortgages?

Home loans spanning 40 years are offered by select lenders, though the loan period is much longer than a standard 30-year home loan. You're more likely to find a maximum of 35 years, such as is the case with Teacher’s Mutual Bank

Currently, 40 year home loan lenders in Australia include AlphaBeta Money, BCU, G&C Mutual Bank, Pepper, and Sydney Mutual Bank.

Even though these lengthier loans 35 to 40 year loans do exist on the market, they are not overwhelmingly popular, as the extra interest you pay compared to a 30-year loan can be over $100,000 or more.

What is the average annual percentage rate?

Also known as the comparison rate, or sometimes the ‘true rate’ of a loan, the average annual percentage rate (AAPR) is used to indicate the overall cost of a loan after considering all the fees, charges and other factors, such as introductory offers and honeymoon rates.

The AAPR is calculated based on a standardised loan amount and loan term, and doesn’t include any extra non-standard charges.

Does Australia have no-deposit home loans?

Australia no longer has no-deposit home loans – or 100 per cent home loans as they’re also known – because they’re regarded as too risky.

However, some lenders allow some borrowers to take out mortgages with a 5 per cent deposit.

Another option is to source a deposit from elsewhere – either by using a parental guarantee or by drawing out equity from another property.

What is an investment loan?

An investment loan is a home loan that is taken out to purchase a property purely for investment purposes. This means that the purchaser will not be living in the property but will instead rent it out or simply retain it for purposes of capital growth.

Can I apply for an NAB home loan during maternity leave?

After you apply for a home loan during maternity leave, an NAB representative will first assess your income, assets, and liabilities to determine if you're able to meet the monthly repayments. Like all home loan applications, you will need to provide specific documentation to NAB while applying for the loan, including recent payslips from three months before your maternity leave, and a letter from your employer stating the details of your absence with the date of your anticipated return, tenure, and income. NAB will also analyse the expenses you need to bear while on leave, for example, utilities, childcare, healthcare services, etc. 

It’s crucial to let the NAB representative know that you’re pregnant and will be going into a paid or unpaid maternity leave, as it can mean a faster chance of approval. 

Similar to a regular mortgage application, you can borrow 80 to 90 per cent of the total property value if you meet the eligibility criteria. If you’re applying for a loan while pregnant, you may want to  consider borrowing 80 per cent or below of the total property value, as this may help  lower the monthly repayment amount. 

Can I get a NAB home loan on casual employment?

While many lenders consider casual employees as high-risk borrowers because of their fluctuating incomes, there are a few specialist lenders, such as NAB, which may provide home loans to individuals employed on a casual basis. A NAB home loan for casual employment is essentially a low doc home loan specifically designed to help casually employed individuals who may be unable to provide standard financial documents. However, since such loans are deemed high risk compared to regular home loans, you could be charged higher rates and receive lower maximum LVRs (Loan to Value Ratio, which is the loan amount you can borrow against the value of the property).

While applying for a home loan as a casual employee, you will likely be asked to demonstrate that you've been working steadily and might need to provide group certificates for the last two years. It is at the lender’s discretion to pick either of the two group certificates and consider that to be your income. If you’ve not had the same job for several years, providing proof of income could be a bit of a challenge for you. In this scenario, some lenders may rely on your year to date (YTD) income, and instead calculate your yearly income from that.

What happens to my home loan when interest rates rise?

If you are on a variable rate home loan, every so often your rate will be subject to increases and decreases. Rate changes are determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, however often when the RBA changes the cash rate, a number of banks will follow suit, at least to some extent. You can use RateCity cash rate to check how the latest interest rate change affected your mortgage interest rate.

When your rate rises, you will be required to pay your bank more each month in mortgage repayments. Similarly, if your interest rate is cut, then your monthly repayments will decrease. Your lender will notify you of what your new repayments will be, although you can do the calculations yourself, and compare other home loan rates using our mortgage calculator.

There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.