Fewer homes taken to auction in July

Fewer homes taken to auction in July

New research from CoreLogic has found that auction volumes remain lower year-on-year, with the number of homes taken to auction over the first week of July less than that of the same time last year.

CoreLogic research shows that 945 capital city auctions held “returned a preliminary auction clearance rate of 68.9 per cent; the 4th consecutive week above 60 per cent”.

“Over the week prior, a higher 1,295 capital city homes were auctioned returning a 62.9 per cent final auction clearance rate,” Jade Harling cited in a report for CoreLogic.

“Auction volumes remain lower year-on-year, with 1,411 auctions held over the same week last year when a lower 52.6 per cent cleared.”

Capital city auction statistics 

City

Clearance rate

Total auctions

Clearance rate

(last year)

Total auctions
(last year)

Sydney

78.2%

352

50.1%

552

Melbourne

70.3%

388

56.1%

631

Brisbane

40.6%

51

42.7%

81

Adelaide

66.7%

70

54.7%

59

Perth

N/A

17

27.8%

26

Tasmania

N/A

3

N/A

5

Canberra

46.8%

64

63%

57

Combined Capital Cities

68.9%

945

52.6%

1,411

Source: CoreLogic

Some regions in Sydney and Melbourne shot high above the combined capital city average of 68.9 per cent, according to CoreLogic research.

Sydney regions with highest auction clearance rates

Region

Clearance rate

Total auctions

City and Inner South

87.8%

48

Ryde

85%

27

Eastern Suburbs

82.1%

36

Source: CoreLogic

Melbourne regions with highest auction clearance rates

Region

Clearance rate

Total auctions

Inner East

83.3%

27

Inner South

78.4%

59

Inner

74.2%

72

Source: CoreLogic

Real Estate Institute of Victoria (REIV) CEO, Gil King, said “there were 290 auctions reported to the REIV, with 209 selling and 81 being passed in, 33 of those on a vendor bid.”

“Nearly half of last week’s auction sales occurred in Middle Melbourne which reported a 79 per cent clearance rate, led by Bentleigh East with seven auction sales,” said Mr King.

RateCity’s auction preparation tips:

  1. Compare home loan lendersuse home loan comparison tools such as tables and calculators to find a home loan that suits your needs and budget.
  2. Get pre-approval organised – organise your finances ahead of the auction. Aim to have pre-approval at least two to four weeks beforehand.
  3. Attend practice auctions­ – check out a few auctions before you go to your dream home’s auction so you understand how they work and can prepare your bidding strategy.
  4. Start low – Try not to get carried away while bidding and offer your limit early. Start low so you have somewhere to go.
  5. Keep your poker face –Much like a game of poker, it’s crucial that you keep your confidence, remain unemotional, and don’t hesitate when you speak so you don’t show weakness to the other bidders.

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In Australia, all lenders are required by law to publish the comparison rate alongside their advertised rate so people can compare products easily.

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The big advantage of borrowing 95 per cent (also known as a 95 per cent home loan) is that you get to buy your property sooner. That may be particularly important if you plan to purchase in a rising market, where prices are increasing faster than you can accumulate savings.

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There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.

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A home loan is considered to be too large when the monthly repayments exceed 30 per cent of your pre-tax income. Anything over this threshold is officially known as ‘mortgage stress’ – and for good reason – it can seriously affect your lifestyle and your actual stress levels.

The best way to avoid mortgage stress is by factoring in a sizeable buffer of at least 2 – 3 per cent. If this then tips you over into the mortgage stress category, then it’s likely you’re taking on too much debt.

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Home loans spanning 40 years are offered by select lenders, though the loan period is much longer than a standard 30-year home loan. You're more likely to find a maximum of 35 years, such as is the case with Teacher’s Mutual Bank

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